WOMEN AND THE HOME

Hole Truths

HELEN G. CAMPBELL May 1 1944
WOMEN AND THE HOME

Hole Truths

HELEN G. CAMPBELL May 1 1944

Hole Truths

WOMEN AND THE HOME

HELEN G. CAMPBELL

Director of Chatelaine Institute

MOST of us nowadays have all we can do to pay our own food bills without providing Mrs. Moth and her family with a year-round banquet. So it’s time we served notice on these star boarders and let them know that wartime budgets don’t allow for harboring any dead beats. Put them on starvation rations and even the youngest will understand you’re no easy mark.

Clothes—Woollen suits, coats and dresses. Make them less appetizing to moths by having them clean. Brisk brushing and airing in the sunshine may be sufficient, providing the treatment is thorough enough. Pay special attention to folds, seams, pleats and pockets as these are the places eggs or larvae may he lurking. If clothes are dirty or spotted better have them dry cleaned and thus made as unpalatable as possible. Then store your moth-free garments in sturdy bags or boxes and seal thoroughly against subsequent invasion. While the hungry hoard prefers soiled clothes they are willing to make a meal of clean ones if there is nothing more to their taste at hand.

Just to show you mean business— no foolin’—it’s a good idea to spray before storing with some reliable fumigant, or slip in a few ounces of fresh naphthalene flakes or paradichlorobenzene crystals, sold under different brand names.

Washable Woollies — Blankets, sweaters, caps, scarves, mitts, underwear and so on. Give them a bath in soap and water for no moths of any age can survive the washtub treatment. As soon as they’re dry put them safely away in a cedar chest, stout bags or boxes and seal with adhesive tape or gummed paper to make mothproof. Or do them up in brown paper bundles, label and seal in the same way. A fumigant, such as you use for woollen clothes, makes doubly sure that no moth will dine on your winter woollies. Store in a reason-

ably cool place; the attic is usually too much of a hot spot for wool storage.

Furs—Pièce de résistance of a moth’s diet. Better be safe than sorry so the wisest thing is to send them to some reliable storage. For a small sum you can have them cleaned, demothed, and protected through the summer in cold storage vaults.

Furniture and Draperies —

Source of many a good dinner for the moth tribe unless you take thorough steps to route them with regular brushings and cleaning. Lift the cushions and turn out the pleats where moth eggs are apt to be hatching. Use your vacuum cleaner attachment to dust seams and reach into dark corners of chairs and chesterfields. Certain antimoth liquids may be safely sprayed on or in the upholstery, but if the pests have a head start in any piece it pays to have it fumigated by an expert.

Rugs—Frequent use of your vacuum cleaner disturbs the whole moth family. Show them that you give no quarter by going after them in every nook and corner which are their favorite hide-outs. Watch dark places behind and under furniture and keep them free of dust and lint. Dust baseboards frequently.

If you take up winter rugs, either send them to commercial storage or clean well, scatter liberally with naphthaleneor paradichloro benzene, roll up, wrap and seal thoroughly.

Piano Felt—To protect piano felting do up a pound or so of naphthalene or paradichlorobenzene in cheesecloth bags and hang high inside the piano. Keep closed when not in use.

Closets, Bureau Drawers, the Mending Basket, Etc.—These are places where moths thrive, so turn them out frequently, dust well get into corners and crevices—and go over them with a damp cloth. Cleanliness, you know, is a moth’s bugbear.