In the Editor's Confidence

In the Editor's Confidence

August 1 1945
In the Editor's Confidence

In the Editor's Confidence

August 1 1945

In the Editor's Confidence

LAST ISSUE we announced that this one would contain an articleon Generalissimo Stalin, by Edgar Snow. It doesn’t. Negotiations with the New York publishing house which will bring out Mr. Snow’s book on Russia resulted in confirmation of our acceptance of a chapter on Stalin for publication in Maclean’s. The piece was in type and ready for the press when, to our amazement, a widely circulated U. S. magazine popped out with the same article. Whether or not it was due to the current heat wave in New York we don’t know, but there had been a mix-up. All we could do was to kill the article, accept apologies with a gracious smile, and walk out to face the world urbanely —breathing heavily and muttering behind our clenched teeth.

% Long, long ago we cracked a joke. We said that if all the statisticians in the world could be laid end to end, it would be a good thing. A lot of after-dinner speakers liked it so much that for many years they used it as an extemporaneous remark, winning great renown. So far as we know, only one orator gave us credit. He did so while introducing Gilbert Jackson, the economist, and he substituted “economists” for “statisticians.” As we were sitting next to Jackson when he did it, for a moment we felt uncomfortable. But Jackson laughed so heartily that he endeared himself to us for life.

That is not the reason why the featured article in this issue is by Gilbert Jackson. It is there because it examines, on a factual basis, what Canada’s trade and income position will have to be in order to provide Full Employment; something we haven’t been able to do in the past. It’s a matter to which Mr. Jackson has devoted more time and study than any other man we know.

#Born in Hedon, Yorkshire, 55 years ago, son of a doctor, Gilbert Edward Jackson was educated at Denstone and St. John’s College, Cambridge, where he took his B.A. In 1911 he came to the University of Toronto as lecturer in economics. When the first Great War broke out he returned to England, enlisted as a private in the Royal West Kent Regiment, served in the Near East and India, subsequently won a commission in the Loyal North Lancashires. After the war he returned to U. of T., was appointed Professor of Economics. He was also economist to the Bank of Nova Scotia; chairman of the Employment Service Council of Ontario. In 1935 he was appointed as adviser to the Governors of the Bank of England on matters pertaining to the dominions. His office was in the august premises of the Old Lady of ThreadneedlevStreet, but he travelled extensively in Australia, South Africa. India and other Empire countries. After four years of that

he returned to Canada because he likes it better than any other country in the world, establishing himself as a consultant. He was a member of the Industrial Disputes Enquiry Commission, the National War Labor Board and the National Selective Service Advisory Board. He is one of the fastest walkers we have ever known, and plays chess with a bland cunning.

§We have just uncrossed our fingers in the matter of Geoffrey Hewelcke’s article on clothes. It was our firm belief that Geoff knew practically nothing about the subject, for when he was a correspondent covering the Royal tour of Canada he reported to readers of the Montreal Standard that Her Majesty the Queen (who was wearing an exquisite gown with eyelet embroidery) was attired in a dress with “a lot of little holes with hemstitching around them.” However, as the basic theme of his article on page 10 is that clothes are crazy, fineness of description is not an essential.

0Hewelcke is a member of Maclean’s editorial staff. Baffled by the pronunciation of his name (it was originally Danish),certain wags just called him Chumley and let it go at that. By patient instruction he finally triumphed. It Is really very simple. All you do is say Hugh Walker quickly, running the two names together. That’s right. You’ve got it. He was born in Baku, the Russian port on the Caspian, where his father was British consul. He was educated at St. Paul’s School, London, and openly boasts that Field Marshal Sir Bernard Montgomery preceded him there. He came to Canada in 1921, worked on newspapers in Calgary, Regina, Windsor and Montreal, went to the National Film Board; thence to Maclean’s. An ardent gardener, he walked into his office one day in early spring carrying a shiny new rake and spade. They are still there.

O Linda Bruce, who tells you all about Canadian radio’s Happy Gang, is a free-lance writer in Toronto, and William Stephenson, who, glory be, reports progress in the matter of the massacre of mosquitoes, is with the Wartime Information Board in Ottawa.

NEXT ISSUE: Beverley Baxter writes on the result of the British election . . . Wilfrid Sanders, of the Canadian Gallup Poll, tells of the things Canadians don’t know about their own country . . . Other articles by Blair Fraser, Gordon Sinclair, Bruce McLeod, Merrill Denison and Dorothy Duncan . . . And three light and excellent fiction stories.