WOMEN AND THE HOME

TIME FOR THANKSGIVING

JANE MONTEITH October 1 1946
WOMEN AND THE HOME

TIME FOR THANKSGIVING

JANE MONTEITH October 1 1946

TIME FOR THANKSGIVING

WOMEN AND THE HOME

JANE MONTEITH

THIS year Canada has reason to give thanks indeed for the richness of her country, the safety and contentment of her people and the brightness of her future.

For we are one of the world’s bestfed nations. During the war years our nutritional status as a nation rose; we consumed more of the protective body-building foods than ever before. But we can afford to include still more vitamin-rich vegetables, fruits and nonwheat cereals in our diet—foods that are a source of alertness and glowing health. And in so doing we release vitally needed meat and nonperishable wheat products to those countries less fortunate than we.

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Fruits lend color and interest to our meals. Baked apples or pears ooze sweetness-—the apples stuffed perhaps with a bit of mincemeat or a mixture of marmalade and peanut butter—the pears basted with maple syrup, molasses or honey.

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Vegetables may come to our tables raw, tossed in wooden bowls well rubbed with garlic—in any combination we fancy. They may be cooked, in a very little water, so that a touch of the original crispness and the minerals and vitamins remain. Sometimes we add a sauce to cooked vegetables or give zest to old favorites with imaginative seasonings.

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Cabbage with Caraway — shred 3 cupfuls of cabbage, combine with a small chopped onion, 34 teaspoonful of caraway seeds, salt, pepper, 1 tablespoonful of butter and 34 cupful of boiling water in a saucepan. Cover, bring rapidly to the boil and cook three to five minutes. Add 2 tablespoonfuls of vinegar and continue cooking a few minutes until cabbage is tender but not soft. Four servings. ♦ ♦

To share our meat rations with hungry people overseas, we can use substitutes which we have in abundance. We can eat more liver, heart and kidneys (to our great benefit physically), more fresh or frozen fish, then turn the meat coupons thus saved over to our local ration board

office. Meat thus shipped to Europe is labelled, “Voluntary donation of ration coupons by Canadians made this meat available.”

Up to the time of writing 756,780 pounds have been sent.

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To roast meats to juicy tenderness with the least possible shrinkage, use a slow oven (325 deg. F.), cooking until the meat is just done. Any fat rendered out during the roasting should be carefully stored in the refrigerator for future use. Smooth gravies can be made with the brown pan drippings.

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We appreciate our good fortune that we do not have to depend on one food to satisfy our needs. For wheat, we may substitute oats, corn or rye products—rely more on potatoes. Fish, nuts and legumes (peas, beans, lentils) will replace some of the meat in our diet. We know, and make use of the fact, that the vitamin C content of an orange is equalled by one cupful of canned tomatoes or juice, one serving of Brussels sprouts, a half serving of broccoli or two servings of raw chopped cabbage.

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Indeed, our scientific knowledge of food values grows faster than we are able to follow. Much of it we do not understand; theories often change with newer research. But one thing seems clear—flavor and food value go hand in hand. So there is an added incentive to serve fruits and vegetables at the peak of their freshness, carefully prepared and tastefully seasoned.

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Recently it has been demonstrated that ice cream is an excellent source of two very necessary vitamins. Children will rejoice that their favorite food is now “good for you” as well as just plain “good.”

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Yes, Canadians young and old may well be grateful as they sit down to enjoy their Thanksgiving dinner. A dinner featuring turkey (or chicken) with a savory potato stuffing, flanked by bright - hued vegetables, and climaxed by a spicy pumpkin pie (baked in a bran pastry shell), is something to be thankful for.