SPORT

WE NOMINATE...

The men who know their hockey best pick this year’s NHL all-star team

JAMES C. HENDY March 15 1946
SPORT

WE NOMINATE...

The men who know their hockey best pick this year’s NHL all-star team

JAMES C. HENDY March 15 1946

WE NOMINATE...

SPORT

THE JUDGES Coaches of tho Six NHL Clubs Jack Adams, Detroit Red Wings. Frank Boucher, New York Rangers. Aubrey (Dit) Clapper, Boston Bruins. C. H. (Happy) Day, Toronto Maple Leafs. Dick Irvin, Montreal Canadiens. Johnny Gottselig, Chicago Black Huwks.

The men who know their hockey best pick this year’s NHL all-star team

JAMES C. HENDY

THE PEOPLE who picked these all-stars for Maclean’s Magazine— the six National Hockey League coaches—are harder to please than anybody else in the hockey business, so there’s probably no greater hockey honor possible than what they do here for Chicago’s “Lightning Line”—the Bentley brothers and Bill Mosienko.

This line, lighter than all the great forward combinations of the past but one of the most effective in hockey’s history, has been picked as a unit for the forward positions on Maclean’s all-star team. For most of the season they ran one-two-three in National Hockey League scoring records; and when I counted the votes from our panel of experts they were still in that order—one-two-three.

Here’s how the all-stars are chosen: Each of the

six NHL pilots picks what he considers to be the best player in the league for each position; then a complete team of second bests; and finally a third forward line, a utility man and an outstanding rookie.

Three points go with each first-team vote, two for a second-team vote and one point for each vote for the third line. Highest possible total would be 18 points, a figure which no player polled this season—though Max Bentley of Chicago Black Hawks collected 16.

Because the coach naturally may have to overlook some of his own best players in making his selections, and because that sort of thing could cause friction in a club, the selections are treated in the strictest confidence and only the consensus is released.

Bill Durnan, goaltender for Montreal Canadiens, who dominated most all-star teams in that position last season, had to be content to tie for first-team honors this year with youthful Harry Lumley of the Detroit Red Wings. Three out of six pilots picked Lumley for the first team and one placed him on the second. Two of them couldn’t see him at all. Durnan received only one first-team vote; four for second.

Emile “Butch” Bouchard, hard-hitting Montreal defense ace, was also named for the first team. He had 13 points, one less than tough Jack Stewart of the Detroit Red Wings. Jack was an all-star three seasons ago, but has been in the Army since the end of the 1942-43 campaign.

The second forward line is composed of Elmer Lach and Maurice Richard of the Montreal Canadiens at centre and right wing, respectively, with Gaye Stewart of Toronto Maple Leafs on left wing. Though he had little hockey in the Navy during the last two seasons, Stewart is greatly improved over the 1942-43 season. He was the league’s outstanding rookie that year.

Boston’s hardy defenseman, Jack Crawford, polled 10 points to win an easy place on the second team, but there was a tie for the other second-team defense position. Babe Pratt of Toronto Maple Leafs and Neil Colville of New York Rangers each had five points. At the time this was written Pratt was suspended from hockey, but he’s undoubtedly one of the greatest players in hockey. This season, playing on defense, Neil Colville has been the same steady player as in the pre-Army days, when he was rated one of the league’s top centres.

The exports’ third line had Milt Schmidt of Boston at centre, Red Hamill of Chicago at right wing and Toe Blake of Canadiens at left. Schmidt, back in hockey for the first time after three years in the RCAF, also was named the all-star club’s utility mun.

The pilots were divided on who was the season’s outstanding rookie. Three of them voted for the Rangers’ smooth-working centre, Edgar Laprade, and three cast their ballots for Chicago’s sha rebooting George Gee.

Maclean’s NHL All-Stars

HERE they are-—all the all-stars for 1945-6 as picked by the NHL managers

and/or coaches and presented by Maclean’s Magazine:

First Team Goal ) H. Lui îmley Detroit 11 pts. {W. Du Durnan Montreal 11 pts. Defense J. Stewart Detroit 14 pts. E. Bouchard Montreal 13 pts. Centre M. Bentley Chicago 16 pts. Rt. Wing W. Mosienko Chicago 15 pts. Left Wing D. Bentley Chicago 13 pts. Second Team Goal W. Durnan Montreal 11 pts. H. Lumley Detroit 11 pts. Defense J. Crawford Boston 10 pts. IN. Colville New York 5 pts. )W. Pratt Toronto 5 pts. Centre E. Lach Montreal 12 pts. Rt. Wing M. Richard Montreal 11 pts. Left Wing G. Stewart Toronto 11 pts.

Third line: Centre— Milt Schmidt, Boston, 3 pts. Right wing—R. Hamill, Chicago, 7 pts. Left wing—H. Blake, Montreal, 5 pts. Utility—M. Schmidt, Boston, 2 pts. Outstanding rookie: Tied at 3 votes— E. Laprade, New York, George Gee, Chicago.