IN THE Editor's Confidence

IN THE Editor's Confidence

August 1 1947
IN THE Editor's Confidence

IN THE Editor's Confidence

August 1 1947

IN THE Editor's Confidence

THE for many year 1913 things, was most notable of which we forget. However, for purposes of today’s subject, viz., The Life and Hard Times of William Winter, we record that it was the year during which Bill Winter, at the age of four, attempted to modernize his uncle’s Gibson girl drawing with a burnt match and thereby launched his career as an artist.

Of the immediate aftermath of this event, Mr. Winter recalls now: “An artist’s life can be

very painful.”

Bill Winter is a rude shock to anyone who believes that no artist is complete without shaggy hair, a long grey smock and a dirty garret.

Taking the points in order:

1. Note haircut below.

2. Note sports jacket below.

3. HE LIVES IN A BUNGALOW.

0His own nutshell story of his life follows:

“Bom Winnipeg 1909. In 1925, at age 16, with samples under arm (charcoal drawing, head of Moses, etc.), got job at Brigdens, a commercial art house, as apprentice at $5 per week. Life wonderful. Next week, life not so wonderful, needed more money. Told not quite at top yet, maybe in year would get $7.

“Spent 14 years learning art business. 1939, arrived in To-

ronto. Have two children, Penny and Stephen, at burnt-match stage. Recreations: drawing, painting and shadowing people with a sketchbook.”

He is a prolific artist, one of Canada’s best magazine illustrators as well as painter of fine art which has earned him recognition as one of the most promising younger artists in Canada today. The cover on this issue is a good example of his distinctive style—and his interest in the activities of people, both singular and plural.

#A11 three fiction stories in this issue were written by women, two of them Canadians—Kay Webster of Vancouver, our 1945 fiction contest winner; and EvaLis Wuorio of Toronto, who at this instant is holidaying in the Timagami district of Ontario she wrote about in the last issue.

The third, Florence R. Christian, lives in Tucson, Arizona, and says she wrote “Cold, Cold Water” (page 21) as pure escapism. In Tucson, the summers get so hot the rivers don’t run at all, let alone cold. We heard from her also, with some awe, that this is her 166th fiction sale.