Fiction

The Girl with the Gingham Heart

ROBERT ZACKS June 1 1950
Fiction

The Girl with the Gingham Heart

ROBERT ZACKS June 1 1950

The Girl with the Gingham Heart

Fiction

ROBERT ZACKS

23 Nov., 1949.

John Banberry, Barrister 320 Bay Street Toronto.

John Banberry how could you say such awful things to Richard? He is a good boy and that automobile accident could have happened to anybody. After all, no one was hurt.

Where is he? I am frantic with worry. Send him home immediately or you will no longer represent this family as attorney.

Very truly,

Mrs. Ellen Farnsworth.

24 Nov., 1949

Mrs. Farnsworth Springdale Garden Acres Erinmore, Ont.

Dear Ellen,

I haven’t got your precious Richard. I don’t know where he is. When I got him off with just a

fine I told him off in language I am somewhat proud of and I am happy to seize this opportunity to extend the same courtesy to you.

That “good boy” of yours, my dear Ellen, is a bum.

The credit for this disaster is wholly yours. I have done my bitter best to keep my promise to your dead husband, Larry, to forestall the character decay made inevitable by your sticky overpossessiveness, but I have failed. Richard is buried to his neck in a swamp of gooey affection (yours) and his self-reliance has never developed to normal manhood. At night your dead husband’s ghost haunts me until I cannot sleep and last night was the payoff.

Shall I select one or two of his escapades to prove my point? As I remember he was—

1. Kicked out of the University of Toronto. Reason: Stealing the Dean’s shoes in the dark of a movie, when the Dean took them off to rest his aching bunions.

2. Kicked out of McGill. Reason: Impersonating a turbaned Prince of India and gaining entrance to a party thrown by the Dean, there creating an uproar by attempting to purchase additions to the royal harem.

3. Kicked out of Agricultural College. Reason: Sneaking a newborn colt from the stable he was assigned to, before reporting the birth, and substi-

tuting a baby zebra, thus creating a furore in horsebreeding circles until alert newspaper reporters checked with the local zoo and exploded the story.

I don’t know where Richard is, and I don’t care. After this automobile smashup I’m finished and I told him so. I wasn’t gentle about it.

No doubt he will come back to Momma and weep on her shoulder. So don’t worry about him. He couldn’t get away from you if he tried.

Sincerely,

John Banberry.

25 Nov., 1949.

John Banberry, Barrister 320 Bay Street Toronto.

Dear Mr. Banberry,

Mrs. Farnsworth has asked me to forward to you the enclosed letter just received from her son Richard and ask you to take appropriate measures to protect him.

She cannot write you herself because she has been in hysterics for a number of hours, uttering violent denunciations of your character. She is under a doctor’s care. He has been feeding her sleeping tablets, for which all the servants are grateful since the last two hours have been rather chaotic.

Report — Code Z-2 — Followed assigned subject, Richard Farnsworth. Took girl to lunch. Girl said money fine if earned by work and sweat. Scornful of rich young men who never lifted a finger. Wealthy subject upset — thinking of his dough. Saw him kiss girl between soup and chicken salad. Signed — Operative Paul Blake

Continued on page 45

Continued from page 7

Just before sleeping pills got a good grip on her she ordered me to tell you as soon as she recovers from the shock she was going to have you disbarred.

Regretfully, Jeffry Lake (secretary). Enel. Lttr dte 24 Nov. fr. Richard.

24 Nov., 1949.

Mrs. Ellen Farnsworth Springdale Garden Acres Erinmore, Ont.

Dearest Mom,

My hide is still smoking from the scorching John gave me. I feel as if I’ve been run through a meat chopper.

1 sure wouldn’t want to be a witness he cross-examines in court.

You know, Mother, nobody ever talked to me that way before. I always used to think the stunts I pulled were kind of funny (you did too, remember?). Even when John was calling me down, I didn’t take him too seriously, but when he said I would starve to death if I had to take care of myself in the world, with no help from you, I started getting sore.

Mother, that’s a challenge that intrigues me. I’ve decided to accept it and show that guy he’s wrong.

I’m here in New York. I haven’t any money (just $17.24), and I don’t want you to send any. If you do, I 11 send it to John to contribute to some charity. I’m in good health, I'm young, I 11 make my way. I’ll find a job.

I’ll show that guy. He’ll eat his words.

Now don’t worry, mother, and please don’t be difficult. You can reach me c/o General Delivery, NYC.

Richard.

CPR TELEGRAPH 119 RD 6 25 NOV. 1949

TO RICHARD FARNSWORTH C/O GENERAL DELIVERY POST OFFICE NYC

DARLING BOY, HOW ABSURD ALL THIS IS. JOHN DIDN’T MEAN A WORD OF IT. HE SENDS HIS APOLOGIES. COME HOME AT ONCE. I AM VERY ILL AND UNDER DOCTOR'S CARE. NEED YOU

CPR TELEGRAPH 211 RD 6 25 NOV. 1949

TO RICHARD FARNSWORTH C/O GENERAL DELIVERY POST OFFICE NYC

STILL THINK YOU'RE A WEAK-KNEED MOMMA'S BOY AND A PRIZE PHONY SPOILED BRAT. YOU'LL COME CRYING HOME IN TWO WEEKS. MAKE THAT ONE WEEK.

JOHN BANBERRY.

WESTERN UNION TELEGRAPH 177 NY 12 27 NOV. 1949 TO ELLEN FARNSWORTH ERINMORE, ONT. MOTHER DARLING YOU'RE AS HEALTHY AS A HORSE. I CHECKED ON LONG DISTANCE CALL TO DOCTOR BARLOWE. UNFAIR OF YOU TO FORCE ME TO USE MY RAPIDLY DWINDLING FUNDS ON YOU THIS WAY. LOVE.

RICHARD.

25 Nov. 1949.

J. L. Harkness

Harkness Detective Agency

NYC

Dear Mr. Harkness:

I am selecting you for this important, confidential job because I know you’ve done satisfactory work for my exattorney, John Banberry. My son, Richard has gone on one of his foolishly boyish escapades and is somewhere in New York City. I am supposed to contact him by writing c/o General Delivery, Main Post Office. He has no funds and is in dire need.

You are to find him, watch him and write me a daily report on his doings. I will fly down and bring him home as

soon as you’ve located where he is staying.

Under no circumstances are you to let John Banberry know of this assignment. He has been discharged by me and we are no longer associated.

Sincerely,

Mrs. Ellen Farnsworth.

HARKNESS DETECTIVE AGENCY NYC

26 Nov., 1949. John Banberry, Barrister 320 Bay Street Toronto.

Dear Johnny, old pal,

Look over the letter I received from Mrs. Farnsworth and let me know what gives? What do you want me to do?

Sincerely,

Jimmy Harkness.

CPR TELEGRAPH 999 PD 74 26 NOV. 1949

TO JIMMY HARKNESS DETECTIVE AGENCY

TAKE FARNSWORTH CASE. SEND ME COPY OF REPORTS TO CLIENT. KEEP ME INFORMED OF MESSAGES FROM ELLEN FARNSWORTH. DON'T HELP KID NO MATTER WHAT HAPPENS. AVOID TELLING EXACT LOCATION OF RICHARD.

JOHN BANBERRY.

HARKNESS DETECTIVE AGENCY NYC

27 Nov. 1949.

Mrs. Ellen Farnsworth Springdale Garden Acres Erinmore, Ont.

Dear Mrs. Farnsworth:

This will acknowledge receipt of your telegram requesting us to report on your son Richard Farnsworth. Our fees are thirty dollars per day for each man put on the case plus expenses. First report, covering one day’s activity, is enclosed.

Sincerely,

J. L. Harkness.

Enel. Report No. 1. Farnsworth Code Z-2 Assigned to Blake

To: J. L. Harkness Report No. — One

27 Nov., 1949. Case—Farnsworth, Richard (Code Z-2) Contact made at 3 p.m. 26 Nov. 1949 with subject by waiting at General Delivery Office. Subject unmistakable. Boy about twenty-two, six feet tall, big shoulders, head of curly golden hair. Nice, but worried grin.

Stood behind him at window, heard name. Subject opened telegram, looked worried, rushed to phone booth, made long-distance call to doctor. Came out looking angry and relieved. Swore out loud a couple of times.

Subject went out, followed him to diner. Subject shivering in raw, grey New York weather. Wearing thin raincoat over good tweed suit. Subject carefully examined menu, ordered bowl of soup, cup of coffee. He looked wistfully over shoulder of truck driver seated next to him. Truck driver was eating huge, steaming dish of beef

I ordered coffee. Waitress brought order. Waitress took look at subject. Her eyes got a sort of glitter. She brought subject very full bowl of soup, six slices of bread, five pats of butter, then hung around smiling hopefully.

Subject didn’t notice. He ate hungrily, sighed, left tip larger than check, walked out. Waitress looked like she wanted to walk after him.

Outside, subject bought newspaper, read want ads, then took bus uptown. Had to grab taxi to follow bus. Subject got off and went into building. Followed him into elevator and up to an employment agency on fifteenth floor. Huge mob of well d essed, anxious young fellows staring coldly at each other, waiting to be interviewed.

Listened to them talk. Job is junior executive, salary five thousand a year.

Long wait. Subject interviewed. Came out looking unhappy and thoughtful.

Followed to another employment agency. Job unknown. Subject didn't get it. Four more agencies in next two hours. No job for subject. Subject looking very grim. Followed subject to Pennsylvania Railroad Station. Subject grabbed sandwich at counter. Counter girl’s eyes started shining. She put eight slices ham in sandwich. No go, though. Subject left big tip, that’s all.

Employment agencies closed. Subject leaned against wall of subway station and watched with peculiar expression on his face as streams of rush-hour New Yorkers jammed past him, trying to get home. Subject’s face wore incredulous look at sight of rush into subway car. Subject leaped forward and saved old lady from being mangled in rush. Old lady pulled away, lowered head and butted way into car.

For some reason this gave subject pleasure. Subject straightened up confidently and went from subway to huge department store on Thirty-Fourth Street. Subject wandered around staring, then took elevator to top floor. Managed to get in with him. Subject looked at me as if he’d seen me before and couldn’t remember face.

Employment offices of store on top floor. Near closing time but subject smiled at girl in charge. Girl got flustered, stammered, blushed, agreed to start him through interview.

Interviewer no girl. A Mr. Cadwaller, thin, gloomy, sharp eyes. Looked subject over. Not impressed. Subject disappeared into depths of testing offices.

Girl asked me if I wanted job. Said no, was looking for complaint department. Girl said it was on fourth floor. Waited for subject to emerge, out in hall.

Subject came out in half hour, looking cheerful. Girl came out too. Girl seemed concerned. Subject said he didn’t mind running an elevator a bit. Girl frowned, a little scornfully. Said a man should settle for elevator operating only when he couldn’t get higher paying job. Asked him if he had any skills at all. Subject answered he had tried to get education number of times, but never managed to complete college. Something always went wrong.

Girl looked sympathetic, put her hand on his arm and said she understood. She’d worked her way through one year of college herself and soon would have enough to take one more term, starting in January.

Subject gave girl a long look. Me too. Something to look at. Girl blushed. They made date for lunch next day. Girl went back to office, still blushing. Subject stared after her with dazed look in his eyes, then left building.

Followed subject to various hotels where he couldn’t get a room.

Followed him down to Rowery where he rented bod for the night in flophouse. Price, thirty-five cents. Subject stared at human derelicts, shame in his face. Saw him give a dollar to old man without teeth.

Since I will be able to contact subject at department store in the morning I broke off assignment at this point.

signed

Operative Paul Blake^

To; J. L. Harkness Report No. 2

Gase Farnsworth, Richard (Code Z-2) 28 Nov., 1949.

Found subject running elevator number 10 at department store. Very

handsome in a uniform. Looks like general without army. Elevator doing wonderful business in spite of jerky stops and starts. Checked every half hour and found same two girls riding up and down with him, trying to flirt with subject. One redhead, one brunette. Subject tending strictly to business. Not easy under circumstances.

Came back near lunch time. Brunette gone, redhead still hanging on Subject looked tired, kept rubbing arm that opens and closes elevator door. He suddenly started smiling. Saw girl from upstairs coming to keep lunch

Relief operator took over. Girl glared at redhead, redhead glared back. Girl took subject’s arm and marched him out the door, treating him coldly, as if he’d done something wrong.

She forgave him over the dessert. Had great trouble getting table near by. Her name, girl said, was Joan Markham. Conversation between two peculiarly uneven. Long looks, silly talk. She likes colors. Yellow. Like his hair. He likes brown, like her eyes. Noticed they were holding hands undeV

They went back to work. I knocked off the job for couple of hours, took in a movie, then picked up trail of subject when he quit work at six o’clock.

He waited for Joan Markham. They went to supper together at a cafeteria. She noticed his thin raincoat, asked why he didn’t wear an overcoat. He said he didn’t have one. She looked shocked. Offered to lend him the money. He said no, he’d stand on his own two feet. She looked proudly at him and squeezed his arm. Said he was absolutely right. It was a tough world and that was what attracted her to him in the first place, his courage in the face of adversity. Subject laughed weakly and mumbled something about wouldn’t it be funny if actually he was very rich and didn’t have to work at all. Girl laughed merrily, said money was a wonderful thing if you earned it; said if there was one thing she couldn’t stand it was those rich kids that never had to lift a finger to make their way. People like that, said the girl very scornfully, had no idea of what life was. Such people, said the girl, were useless to the world.

Subject seemed extremely disturbed. Said jokingly that maybe if girl had a chance to meet such fellows she’d feel differently. Girl dropped her fork and said angrily she had such a boy friend and she wanted subject to know she could have lived in luxury if she’d wanted, only the fellow was just an empty-headed playboy and she felt she’d be bored with him.

Subject said gloomily it was a good thing, then, that he was just an elevator operator. Girl said that was nonsense, she loved the good things of life as well as anybody, that an elevator operator’s salary would hardly buy them; not, she added hastily, her face getting red, that she meant . . . that . .

At this point subject rapidly went around table and kissed girl with great enthusiasm. He returned to his chicken salad.

They went to a movie and sat in the last row of the balcony. I tailed them afterward to a coffee and doughnut shop and then to her apartment bous»;. Subject kissed girl good night and immediately left for the Bowery.

Operative Paul Blake.

CPU TELEGRAPH 213 RD 6 29 NOV 1949

TO HARKNESS DETECTIVE AGENCY, NYC ARRIVING BY PLANE TOMORROW MEET ME AT AIRPORT. FLIGHT NO 20«. DUE IN 2 PM WILL BE TAKING RICHARD HOME WITH ME

MRS ELLEN FARNSWORTH

Continued on pufte 48

Continued from page 46

WESTERN UNION TELEGRAPH 113 KL 29 NOV. 1949

TO JOHN BANBERRY, 320 BAY STREET, TORONTO. MRS. FARNSWORTH COMING TOMORROW BY PLANE. WHAT WILL I DO?

JIM HARKNESS.

CPR TELEGRAPH 866 RD 6 29 NOV. 1949

TO JIM HARKNESS DETECTIVE AGENCY YOU'VE GOT TO STOP HER. THE BOY IS LOWING GOOD STUFF. IF SHE INTERFERES NOW HE'S COOKED. TRY NOT MEETING HER AT THE PLANE. IF SHE SHOWS UP AT AGENCY TELL HER RICHARD LEFT TOWN OR SOMETHING. AT ALL COSTS KEEP HER FROM FINDING RICHARD.

JOHN BANBERRY.

HARKNESS DETECTIVE AGENCY NYC

30 Nov., 1949. John Banberry, Barrister 320 Bay Street Toronto.

Dear Johnny,

I feel awful. Everything went as wrong as you could imagine. You remember from the duplicate reports that we were careful not to mention the specific department store Richard was working at? Unfortunately we did say I it was around Thirty-Fourth Street and I Mrs. Farnsworth, instead of coming to the agency to ask why we didn’t meet the plane, went directly to ThirtyFourth Street and barged through all the stores, looking over the elevator operators.

My operative, Blake, saw the whole thing. I almost wept when I read his report. It’s enclosed. Sorry, old boy.

Sincerely,

Jimmy Harkness. Enel. Report No. 3, Farnsworth

30 Nov., 1949.

To: J. L. Harkness Report No. 3

Case—Farnsworth, Richard (Code Z-2)

Contacted subject at lunch time, tailing him and girl friend through lunch hour. Subject seemed extremely ga" and full of witty remarks that had girl laughing hilariously. They kissed passionately outside department store and separated.

At six o’clock, just as doors were about to close, girl appeared at elevators and started telling subject she’d have to work half an hour overtime. At this point there was a cry that could have come from a scalded wounded tigress. Everybody turned around. A buxomy matron was advancing toward subject who promptly turned pale and tried to hide in the elevator. This lady was of formidable appearance and behind her came a burly man clad in a chauffeur’s uniform. This chauffeur carried on his arm a heavy overcoat, which the lady, after firmly kissing subject and scolding him roundly for running away like a foolish boy, gave to him with severe admonishing about catching cold.

'Phe girl listened to all this wideeyed. She also got a good look at the diamond rings on the woman’s fingers, the bracelet on her arm, and the mink coat on her back.

She gave the subject a cold, bitter look and disappeared into the crowd.

'I he last I saw of the subject, he had just pulled away from his mother, yelled at her to go back home where she belonged, and started after the girl Lady threw a faint. Subject let her

I went up to the employment office and found the girl had got her coat and quit her job. Subject was trying to find girl, but employment manager was hanging on to him, insisting he finish day or return uniform immediately Subject chose to return uniform I followed subject to girl’s apartment house, but she was not there Subject appears to be half crazy with anguish A pathetic sight

Subject went back to store which was now closed and waited outside employment entrance until eight o’clock at which time employment manager appeared. Employment manager treated subject with great caution, stating subject’s mother had spoken to him, attempting to discover subject’s whereabouts. Employment manager seemed very worried about subject’s mother. Subject made deal with employment manager, offering protection in return for information as to possible whereabouts of Joan Markham. Employment manager stated girl was taking course in University of Miami. Florida, in Marine Biology, and was due for next term in January. That was all he knew.

Followed subject back to flophouse in Bowery. Interested to see what will happen, as subject can’t have more than five dollars left. Awaiting instructions.

signed

Operative Paul Blake.

CPR TELEGRAPH 88 K! 6 DEC. 2, 1949 TO JIMMY HARKNESS DETECTIVE AGENCY, NYC. SEND OPERATIVE BLAKE TO UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI PICK UP TRAIL OF JOAN MARKHAM. REPORT TO ME ONLY, NOT ELLEN FARNSWORTH. UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES ASSIST RICHARD IN ANY WAY HE NOW HAS AN INCENTIVE.

JOHN BANBERRY.

WESTERN UNION TELEGRAPH 553 TD 9 DEC. 3, 1949

TO JOHN BANBERRY, 320 BAY STREET, TORONTO GOT TO GET TO FLORIDA RIGHT AWAY. LEND ME FIFTY DOLLARS, NO MORE. JUST ENOUGH FOR COACH FARE. WILL PAY YOU BACK SOON RICHARD.

CPR TELEGRAPH 33 2P 9 DEC. 3, 1949 TO RICHARD FARNSWORTH, C/O GENERAL DELIVERY, POST OFFICE, NYC WHAT WOULD YOU DO IF YOU DIDN'T KNOW ME? WHERE'S THAT IMAGINATION NOW, THAT WAS ABLE TO DEVISE SUCH CLEVER PRACTICAL JOKES? THE ANSWER TO YOUR REQUEST IS NO! STAND ON YOUR OWN TWO FEET!

JOHN BANBERRY.

HOTEL BOCA CEGA

Miami, Fla.

10 December 1949.

To: J. L. Harkness Report No. 4

Case Farnsworth, Richard (Code Z-2) Last report. This is my resignation, too. Better start from the beginning

Per instructions took four-hour flight from New York to Miami. Nice and warm down here. Golden sun, clean crystal ocean, no smoke. Can’t figure out why people live in the North.

Found room at only $lí> a day. Rented auto and drove to University of Miami.

Told Registrar I was relative of Joan Markham. She wasn’t due for one day yet. Hung around, drawing stares from students. Changed into canaryyellow slacks and shirt with fish on it. Students no longer noticed me.

Joan Markham arrived. Tailed her. She became suspicious, asked me if I was following her. Not like New York here. Less crowded, can’t get lost in crowd Told her I was. Girl asked why. Told her I was interested Marine Biology. Girl demanded to know what specialty. Said 1 was studying “lemmings.” Once read a magazine article on it Girl laughed. Still suspicious but amused. Thought I was falling for her. Could, too She went away. 'Phis time, living more careful, 1 followed from greater distance.

Tailed her for two more days. Then saw strange incident A scarecrow tried to throw arms around her A down and out unshaven, hollow eyed character that could hardly walk Rushed forward to aid girl. Saw with astonishment, scarecrow was Richard Farns-

worth. Listened from behind palm

Girl was horrified at subject’s appearance. Me too. As girl listened icily, subject explained quavering voice. He had no money, so he answered newspaper ad. Papers full of them this season of year in New York. People drive down to Miami in two or three days, want help in driving. Free transportation in return for driving. Subject hadn’t slept in 72 hours except for two-hour snatches.

Girl smiled scornfully. Noticed girl had lovely lips, even when sneering. Called subject a liar. Asked where his Momma was. Subject started getting mad. Gave girl good shaking, then nearly fell down from exhaustion. Clung to her, told girl he loved her, said he was not taking dime from mother, even though she was wealthy woman. Said it wasn’t his fault he was born with million dollars. Give him a

Girl looked doubtful. Eyes on subject long and lingeringly. Girl agreed to wait and see. Said if subject could prove he was man of initiative and brains, all right. But no elevator jobs. And no help from mother.

Followed two of them. Girl staked subject to haircut, shave and meal. Then she told him he was on his own. G:rl gave him address, shook hands firmly with him, wished him luck. Subject demanded to know where girl was going. Girl said home, and went without looking back. Subject stared after her forlornly.

Watched subject for two days. Subject slept under palm trees. Subject wandered around looking over town, evidently thinking. Interesting to watch results of thought. Subject got out on road to hitch lift, so hurriedly took rented car past and gave him lift.

Subject stared at me intently, asked if he didn’t know me from somewhere. Asked him if he was ever in Trinidad. No. Mexico City? No. Rio de Janeiro? No. Told him he must be mistaken. Asked him where he was going? Subject said to look for supper. Was going to take him and grab check, but remembered instructions. No help for subject.

Subject let out a yell. Car was riding over long causeway connecting Miami to Miami Beach. People fishing off bridge. Asked him what was the matter. Subject said enthusiastically he knew where to get supper. Invited me to be guest. Refused. Dropped him off near group of men fishing.

Two days passed. No big ideas yet. Easier to stay near girl than subject. Then girl saw subject. He was plunking guitar on Miami Beach for money. Subject wore a cowboy hat, sang cowboy love songs, then passed hat. Money tinkled like rain during storm. Girl furious. Turned away ignoring pleas of subject.

Next day was surprised to see girl going on date with man. Not subject. Man had big, black car, slightly over-

bearing manner, looked at girl posses sively. Followed car. Passed subject fishing for lunch on causeway, stopped, ! took him in for ride. Subject watched in dismay when car stopped where fishing boats go out from Biscayne ¡ Boulevard and girl got out, aided by possessive man.

Subject sat and suffered as girl and new boy friend went into rented boat for day of deep-sea fishing. Subject said bitterly that was his girl. Asked him what she was doing with other guy. Subject didn’t answer. Got out of car, sat on dock and stared unhappily after fishing boat. Asked him if he was coming along with me. He said no, he’d wait there.

Left him there. Came back at five o’clock when boats start returning with catch. Subject still there, staring at tremendous swordfish and marlin being brought in. Terrific. Subject went over to man on dock, asked what happened to fish. Man said fish usually stuffed. Subject asked what happened to meat of fish. Man shrugged. Said was thrown away or used for fertilizer or sold cheap.

Subject came back and grabbed me by arm in grip that hurt. He was very excited. Said he had wonderful idea for business. Asked him what idea was. Subject explained feverishly he had gone to Agricultural College for a while. Had learned a lot about canning perishables. Knew how to set up a small canning outfit. Why not set up outfit right on docks? When sportsman catches big fish instead of just having stuffed skin or pictures toshow his catch, why not process fish for him, ' put it in cans and put fancy labels on cans telling weight of fish caught, date, name of fisherman? Novel idea. Fisherman would have thousand pounds of canned fish he caught, all from one fish.

I kind of liked the idea. Tried it out. Went over to old man just coming off fishing boat and asked him if he would be a customer. Old man was very interested. Wanted to know when we’d open business. Subject was behind me and he shouted, “Two weeks.”

I am now in business with subject. Bank is matching my savings with a loan of ten thousand, promise of more if we need it. Live-wire chamber of commerce out here. They’re helping out swell.

So this is my last report. Oh, by the way. Girl and subject were married on fishing boat yesterday. Honeymoon will have to wait. Got to get business going first.

Signed,

Operative Blake.

CPR TELEGRAPH 116 Ql 9 13 DEC., 1949

TO PAUL BLAKE, HOTEL BOCA CEGA,

MIAMI, FLORIDA

RESERVE FISHING BOAT FOR ME FOR TWO WEEKS.

I'M GOING TO GIVE RICHARD AND JOAN SOME BUSINESS. WE WON'T TELL MRS. FARNSWORTH ANYTHING UNTIL BUSINESS IS A SUCCESS.

JOHN BANBERRY. ★