Maclean’s MOVIES

Maclean’s MOVIES

CLYDE GILMOUR January 15 1953
Maclean’s MOVIES

Maclean’s MOVIES

CLYDE GILMOUR January 15 1953

Maclean’s MOVIES

CLYDE GILMOUR

BREAKING THE SOUND BARRIER: A

topnotch British film centring on the jet-era pilots who fly faster than the speed of sound. The eerie poetry of its aviation sequences makes most other "air thrillers" seem like child's play. Not quite so impressive, but decently done nonetheless, is the human drama behind all this, centring around an iron-willed capitalist (Ralph Richardson) who values progress more highly than money.

COME BACK, LITTLE SHEBA: Shirley

Booth's wonderfully detailed port.ayal of a dimwitted housewife is worth going out of your way to see. There is a lot of force and honesty in this close up of a regrettable marriage, although husband Burt Lancaster is sometimes in histrionic waters a bit over his depth.

THE HAPPY TIME: An occasional taint of coyness does not prevent this from being, in the main, a pleasant comedy about adolescence and l’amour in Ottawa in 1924.

HURRICANE SMITH: Shapely is the word for Yvonne DeCarlo, and corny is the word for this heavy-breathing pirate mellerdrammer, co-starring John Ireland as a fugitive from justice. A homicidal shark, un identified in the credits, is the real star of the cast.

IVANHOE: The famous novel by Sir

Walter Scott now becomes a satisfying medieval horse-opera on the screen, and enjoyable entertainment for •_ oung and old. Robert Taylor, George Sanders, Elizabeth Taylor and Joan Fontaine are among the participants.

LIMELIGHT: Garrulous in spots, this is still one of the finest movies in a coon's age, and at its best it matches anything else Charles Chaplin has evei done. It's a bitter-sweet tale about a oncegreat clown who brings courage and beauty into the life of a forlorn ballerina. Claire Bloom, in the latter role, is the newest and most promising of Chaplin’s discoveries.

MR. DENNING DRIVES NORTH: A somewhat muddled suspense item from Britain. It tells of John Mills' desperate attempts to conceal the accidental kill ing of a blackmailer.

MONKEY BUSINESS: A laboratory chimp unwittingly brews an elixir of youth, causing chemist Cary Grant and wife Ginger Rogers to start cutting up like teen-agers. There are moments of wit and literacy in the ensuing shenanigans, but the joke runs threadbare before the finish.

NEVER TAKE NO FOR AN ANSWER: A

tender, leisurely comedy-drama from Italy. Its small-boy hero (Vittorio Manunta) battles his way through a thousand obstructions seeking the Pope's permission to admit the lad's sick donkey into the church of St. Francis. The photography is beautiful.

PENNY PRINCESS: A British comedy,

less expertly acted than most of them but with a fair-enough story idea wrapped up in it. A New York shopgirl (Yolande Donlan) inherits a pocketsize European country c-nd floods the world with its basic product, an alcoholic cheese. A. E. Matthews is briefly amusing as an irascible tycoon.

PLYMOUTH ADVENTURE: Hollywood

has done well by the Mayflower and its pHgrims, and the stout little ship's buffeting by a mid-Atlantic tempest is a real pulse-quickener. Spencer Tracy, Leo Genn, Gene Tierney and Van Johnson are on board.

STORY OF WILL ROGERS: America's

cowboy humorist who died in an Alaskan plane crash in 1935, is cap ably impersonated by his own son in this rather uneventful but genial bi ography.

WATER BIRDS: Another in the delightful series of wildlife featurettes—not a cartoon, although supervised by Walt Disney and imbued with his familiar antic spirit.

Gilmour Rates

Affair in Trinidad: Drama. Fair.

African Queen: Adventure. Excellent.

Because of You: Drama. Fair.

Because You're Mine: Lanza operatic

comedy. Good.

Big Jim McLain: Spy drama. Fair.

The Big Sky: Adventure. Good.

Captive City: Crime drama. Good.

Carrie: Tragic drama. Good.

The Devil Makes 3: Suspense. Good. Dreamboat: Satiric comedy. Good. Fearless Fagan: Comedy. Good.

5 Fingers: Spy drama. Excellent.

The Fourposter: Marital drama. Fair. Hawks in the Sun: Air war. Good.

High Noon: Western. Tops.

I Believe in You: Drama. Good. Importance of Being Earnest: Oscai

Wilde comedy. Excellent.

Island of Desire: Tropic drama. Poor.

Just for You: Crosby musical. Fair.

The Magic Box: Drama. Good.

The Merry Widow: Musical. Fair.

Miracle in Milan: Italian fantasy. Good.

My Man and I: Drama. Fair.

Narrow Margin: Suspense. Excellent.

O. Henry's Full House: Multi-story

"package." Good.

Outcast of the Islands: Drama. Good.

Pat and Mike: Comedy. Excellent.

Paula: Drama. Fair.

The Promoter: British comedy. Good.

The Quiet Man: Irish comedy. Good. Scaramouche: Costume drama. Good. The Sniper: Suspense. Excellent.

Snows of Kilimanjaro: Drama. Good. Somebody Loves Me: Musical. Good.

; Son of Paleface: Bob Hope. Good.

Story of Mandy: Drama. Good.

! Story of Robin Hood. Adventure. Good.

I Sudden Fear: Suspense drama. Fair

The Thief: No talk spy tale. Good.

We’re Not Married: Comedy. Good. What Price Glory?: 1914 war. Fair. Where’s Charley?: Musical. Fair.

Yankee Buccaneer: Adventure. Fair.

You For Me: Hospital farce. Fair.

MMMNI