Picture Essay

A City with a Heart

To an artist with a camera, Montreal is a rich fusion of the grave and the gay, the florid and the drab. But most of all it is

Karsh's Montreal March 1 1953
Picture Essay

A City with a Heart

To an artist with a camera, Montreal is a rich fusion of the grave and the gay, the florid and the drab. But most of all it is

Karsh's Montreal March 1 1953

A City with a Heart

Picture Essay

Karsh's Montreal

To an artist with a camera, Montreal is a rich fusion of the grave and the gay, the florid and the drab. But most of all it is

YOUSUF KARSH, who is becoming almost as well known as a critic of Canadian food as he is an interpreter of Canadian features, had nothing hut good will for a city -where dining is not a means to an end hut an end in itself. Fortified by Bollinger brut ’43, from the famous wine cellar of the RitzCarlton hotel, Karsh came to feel that the great city itself had some of the qualities of good wine: age, mellowness, sparkle and constant surprise. “It is an exciting city,” Karsh remarked soon after his arrival, and he went on to prove it in these pictures, which range all the way from painter Arthur Lismer and his new McGill course in creative teaching to a group of Glasgow merchant seamen raising their glasses in the famous eighty-year-old Joe

Beef tavern on the waterfront. Lisrner, who is teaching thirdyear co-eds how to teach others, made a quick pencil sketch of Karsh, showing the shiny dome of his head poised above his Rolleifiex. The seamen cheerfully posed after Karsh ordered beer for the house. Hearing he worked for Maclean’s they asked for two mor© free rounds which Karsh was happy to order for them.

Though the contrasts here are perhaps greater than Karsh found anywhere else in Canada, he did not see Montreal as a city split into two racial compartments. He found it an amicable if worldly town where two races dovetail neatly together and where, if the inclinations of the flesh are indulged, the needs of the heart and of the spirit are never neglected.

Karsh Takes Montreals Pulse and Finds It Health

A Mayor and his People

Yousuf Karsh chooses the Falstaffian figure of Camillien Houde to symbolize the human contrasts in a worldly yet pious city

WHEN the Karshs arrived unannounced in the office of Mayor Camillien Houde, his Worship was characteristically receiving a group of gourmets, for it was the week of Les Amis d’Escoffier. The mayor immediately turned a limousine and two chauffeurs (one Frenchspeaking, one English-speaking) over to the photographer and asked him to make an appointment later in the week. “You arrange it with my secretary,” he said. “He is my io~key% I only run.” Karsh signed the golden book and then proceeded to photograph Houde’s people: a bank president (the Bank of Montreal of course), a diseuse from Paris, a group of children playing at churchgoing, and a worker in an aircraft plant. This accomplished, he returned

to the city hall to photograph the mayor.

Karsh, who describes Houde as “an artist as well as a politician,” was greatly attracted to the ebullient mayor who got off some typical Houdisms as these pictures were being taken:

ON WESTMOUNT: “All of the people oi Westmount (Montreal’s wealthy English-speaking residential district) become Montrealers when they go to New York. But when they come back here they are Westmounters again.” ON MUNICIPAL RELATIONS: “The

suburbs come to us and they say: ‘We contribute a lot to you.’ We tell them, ‘Yes—you contribute all the fires and we put them out for you.’ ” AND ON HIMSELF: “I am a sanguin nerveux (literally: ‘a nervous blood’).

They all tell me it is terrible. I knew that—but I didn’t know they knew it.”

The Karshs left Houde’s office with the impression of a remarkably knowledgeable and sensitive man. The self-educated mayor instantly tabbed Solange Karsh as the namesake of a character .in a little-kno\Vn book, Les Bouffons by Miguel Zamacois. And when Yousuf Karsh told him how he photographed the great Finnish composer Sibelius, he noticed tears spring into Houde’s eyes. Karsh felt the mayor fitted perfectly into the cosmopolitan Montreal scene: “He is perfectly enamored of his own city,” he reported. “He believes in it. In his love for Montreal he is completely sincere.” Karsh says he too experienced a similar emotion.

Finance

Industry

The Body and The Soul

In Montreal, some of the worlds greatest doctors and divines tread separate pathways in their quest to heal the ailing spirit of mankind

AT THE moment when Karsh made the compelling human portrait on the left, two great scientists dedicated to the preservation of human life had just been reminded that in the end their ancient adversary, death, must always win. Their favorite orderly, a veteran of a* quarter century’s service in the famous Montreal Neurological Institute, had just collapsed and died of a heart ailment that neither he nor any of his colleagues knew he had. Dr. Wilder Penfield, O.M., and his colleague Dr. William Cone, two of the world’s greatest neurologists, looked up from their microscopes and, with their postgraduate students grouped behind them, contemplated momentarily the eternal mysteries which have occupied their lives.

The portraits on these pages all have to do with the spirit of man. Penfield and Cone approach the problem through man’s mind and their enquiries into the human brain have made them world famous. Dr. Hans Selye, whose “stress” theory has also made him internationally renowned, has explored the spirit through the body, for if it is under any kind of stress, he says, the spirit can never be at rest.

Msgr. Olivier Maurault, the cheerful Sulpician father who is rector of the great Université de Montréal, approaches the spirit through the soul. And in this vibrant yet saintly man, Karsh again caught something of the spirit of Montreal: “As a Catholic,” he said, “the monseigneur is as ancient as his creed; but as a Canadien he is as intensely alive as the great city in which he lives.”