IN THE EDITORS' CONFIDENCE

A Whole Shelf of Books

February 15 1954
IN THE EDITORS' CONFIDENCE

A Whole Shelf of Books

February 15 1954

A Whole Shelf of Books

IN THE EDITORS' CONFIDENCE

HARDLY A WEEK seems to pass nowadays without the news that one or another of the various writers associated with Maclean’s has produced a book for publication. Some of the books have already appeared, in their initial form, in this magazine. Others may appear in the future. Some have nothing to do with Maclean’s at all, except that the’ writer’s name is a familiar one to our readers. But we’re glad to hear about them and we wish them all well.

Fred Bodsworth, for example, tells us that he has just had a book accepted by Dodd, Mead in New York. It’s about a rare bird, the Eskimo curlew. Robert Thomas Allen has just completed a book manuscript for publication, called How To Do Everything. Sidney Katz is working on a book about Ernest Douglas, the man who cures stutterers, and whom he wrote about for Maclean’s not long ago. Article editor Ian Sclanders is working on a book about his native Maritimes.

Ralph Allen’s second novel, The Chartered Libertine, will be published by the Macmillan Company this spring. Lionel Shapiro is busy on his third novel. Pierre Berton’s expansion of his Maclean’s series, The Family In the Palace, will be published in both Canada and the U. S. this March under the title of The Royal Family. Sidney Margolius is busy updating his best-selling Buying Guide while Marjorie Wilkins Campbell is gathering material for a book about the Northwest Company. Her recent book, Ontario, is selling well and many readers will remember that her earlier book, The Saskatchewan, in the Rivers of America series, first appeared in condensed form in Maclean’s.

James Dugan, who helped JacquesYves Cousteau write the best-selling The Silent World, has completed a book about the famous Great Eastern, the giant cable-laying ship, called The Great Iron Ship. It is a Book Of The Month Club selection for this month.

All this activity in what is known

as “the hard-cover field” reminds us that a magazine, in spite of its soft covers, is essentially a sort of continuing library. Maclean’s readers have been getting and will continue to get the cream of many important books long before they are published. A good example of this was Sir John Hunt’s story, My Worst Hours On Everest, the bonus-length article we published well before the appearance of his book, The Ascent of Everest. Maclean’s was the first periodical in the world to publish this account by Hunt. Almost all of Richmond P. Hobson’s Grass Beyond the Mountains first appeared in Maclean’s. The book was later a best seller in

Canada, the United States and England.

Other books which Maclean’s readers have dipped into recently before publication include Bruce Hutchison’s controversial biography of Mackenzie King, The Incredible Canadian, Dr. J. P. Moody’s Pioneer of the Barren North, W. O. Mitchell’s The Alien, the Hon. Ewen Montagu’s The Man Who Never Was (which we published in two long parts as The Corpse That Hoaxed the Axis), Rudolph Flesch’s How To Make Sense, and Bert Parker’s Kid in the Klondike.

Now we’re happy to announce that we will soon begin exclusive publication of Thomas B. Costain’s eagerly awaited history of early Canada, The White and the Cold. This is such an important and lively book for Canadians that we have decided to devote part of fifteen issues to it, and to illustrate it with oil paintings and sketches by Franklin Arbuckle. It will begin in our March 15 issue. ★