IN THE editors’ confidence

IN THE editors’ confidence

How our words echo abroad

November 10 1956
IN THE editors’ confidence

IN THE editors’ confidence

How our words echo abroad

November 10 1956

IN THE editors’ confidence

How our words echo abroad

It’s not too often that a man sees his own words coming back to him in the form of Oriental characters, but that’s what happened to Fred Bodsworth the other day. The mail, which brings many things (including some rather violent letters), brought a copy of a Korean newspaper, and there, pictures and all, was Bodsworth’s article from our issue of Nov. 12, 1955, Buck Crump’s Love Affair with the CPR.

It turns out that there’s a staunch Rotarian in Winnipeg who sends his back copies of Maclean’s to another staunch Rotarian in Seoul, Korea. The Korean was leafing through some of these issues when he came upon the Crump story and realized that this must be the same Buck Crump who was a college classmate of his away back when. The tale of Crump’s rise so impressed him that he had it translated into Korean and published in the daily Kyung Hyang Press, which in turn included it in a monthly digest.

We make no effort to sell or distribute Maclean's outside of Canada. In fact, distribution to foreign countries can be so costly that we have to charge double rates to mail the magazine abroad. All the same it still keeps popping up in the distant corners of the world—in places like Johannesburg, Stockholm, Milan and Seoul. About twenty-five thousand copies are sold at the foreign rates—largely to expatriate Canadians and their friends —but thousands more are mailed off by people like the Winnipeg Rotarian, who take the magazine for themselves and then pass it along. We often get comments from far-off climes on articles, stories or covers that are several years old.

Just the other day, for instance, we got a note from Miss Phyllis Cobden in Christchurch, New Zealand. Miss Cobden had been looking at Franklin Arbuckle’s cover painting of the giant checker game in Stanley Park—our issue of Aug. 1, 1953. She was so intrigued she decided to petition the municipal authorities to install similar services.

A good many people in foreign countries read Maclean’s articles without knowing it. Hardly an issue goes by that one or two pieces aren't picked up, reprinted or condensed in a foreign publication. For instance, Doug Wilkinson’s article. How I Became an Eskimo (which was expanded into a book titled Land of the Long Day) has been reprinted several times in such publications as Lectures Pour Tous (France) and the Frankfurter Illustrated (Germany), as well as in Sweden. Australia, England and the Netherlands.

Maclean’s articles have appeared in such widely divergent publications as Woman’s Day and the Sydney Morning Herald (Australia), Le Comtois (France), Al It (Sweden), Panorama (Netherlands), Femina (New Zealand), Tempo and Epoca (Italy), the Natal Witness (South Africa), VZ (Switzerland) and the Irish Digest.

We’re pleased about this, of course. For. as well as bringing extra money to Canadian writers, it also means that a growing volume of information about Canada is finding its way around the world. ★