Parade

Parade

How to beat a parking ticket

December 8 1956
Parade

Parade

How to beat a parking ticket

December 8 1956

Parade

How to beat a parking ticket

Police are constantly thinking up fiendish new ways to torment illegal parkers. In Calgary they're trying humiliation, instead of punishment, as reported by an indignant motorist who watched police tow away a Cadillae and a Buick from a rush-hour route and leave his '39 heap right where it sat between the other two. In Guelph, Ont., they’re resorting to violenee. as testified by a motorist who foolishly drove to the police station to try to talk the sergeant into canceling a parking ticket he felt he’d been given unjustly. The police not only refused to cancel the ticket, but when he left the station he discovered a police cruiser had just rammed into the rear of his car right on the police lot.

But in Hamilton, Ont., we are cheered to report, a motorist finally got a break. The cop there had his pad of parking tickets at the ready as he bore down on the late-model car double parked on Locke St., but the driver who came hustling out at this point was saved by the sign he’d stuck in the windshield. The sign said "For sale.” The cop put away his ticket book and pulled out his cheque book. The cop drove off with his car. the former owner subsequently moved to California, and that was that. Pretty drastic way of getting out of a ticket but it worked.

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If we hadn’t heard it from a fellow with a square-cut Scots name living in a place as respectable as Jersey Cove, Victoria County, Nova Scotia, we’d scarcely have credited the tale at all. But he swears he saw it happen with his own eyes when he and a friend went hunting in Cape Breton and, having tramped for hours without sighting any game, stood their guns against a tree and sat down to rest. At a sudden explosion they looked around just in time to see a squirrel

tumble dead from the tree. Another squirrel. fleeing in guilty terror, was just taking a flying leap from the trigger guard of one gun. which was still smoking. When last seen the killer was heading for the deep hush, but now if you hear of a squirrel being hauled up for murder down Victoria County way, you’ll know what went before.

Like a lot of people who’ve been making speeches about it lately we're all for setting up that Canada Council, as recommended by the Massey Commission, to help the arts over the hurdles in Canada. But we don’t know what an organization like that could have done for a frustrated artist in oils we’ve heard about, a Montreal housewife. She had finally

achieved one of those rare quiet moments to herself that all housewives dream about; so she quickly got out her paints and set up an attractive still life. Then the phone rang, and by the time she got back her sixteen-month-old daughter had crawled up and devoured her subject— three pears, two apples and one green pepper. All that’s going to help an artist in a spot like that is a stomach pump and she very nearly had to phone for one

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There’s a sign on the outskirts of St.

James, Man., that announces "St. Charles Rifle Range,” and right next to it one that says "No shooting.”

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You'd think Metropolitan Toronto’ bus drivers were out to win some kind of be-kind-to-passengers award if we told you about the driver on a Forest Hill route who made a special stop in mid-block to let a woman out in front of her house in the rain—and then borrowed another passenger’s umbrella to escort her to her door.

You’d have to admit the Toronto driver was barely civil, however, in comparisoi with the bus operator we’ve just heai, about in Burnaby. B.C. When one of hi.» regular passengers yelled at him to wait as she came flying out her front door he did: when she discovered she’d left her purse behind he waited for her to go back and get it; and when she discovered the only way into the locke« house was a ground-floor window sh«, couldn’t quite reach, he scrambled in for her and got the purse.

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