Parade

A warning about winter underwear

January 5 1957
Parade

A warning about winter underwear

January 5 1957

We have sworn testimony that when a Lethbridge, Alta., man fled the prairie winter for a Honolulu vacation he got there so fast he was still wearing his long winter underwear. After a trip to a Honolulu laundry the red flannels came back with a bill for $1.75—because the laundry, never having seen anything like them before, took no chances and dry cleaned them.

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Come sleet or drifts, motorists know they’ll always be rescued on one sector of the Montreal-Toronto highway near Beauharnois. A service station there has the usual repair truck plus a small army tank—minus turret and cannon but armed with crane, winch and snowplow blade.

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A motorist who is glad his garage has no equipment quite that heavy is a man in Watrous, Sask., who got into enough trouble as it was when he called a local service station to report that his car wouldn't start. The two fellows who came with the tow truck couldn’t start it either, so they hauled it away for investigation. Well, the engine did start before they reached the garage, but they kept on going and just as they rolled inside the repair shop the man driving the customer’s car discovered the brakes were frozen. Frantically he put the engine in reverse but not soon enough, as with a great crash car ran into tow truck. Still excited, the driver went to climb out, hit the gas pedal and rammed ’er backwards into the garage doors, which had just slid shut. Total damage, fortunately payable by the garage: $400.

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Winter’s upsets can embarrass little garage operators or giant railroads, although we must say the CNR asked for it when, during one of last winter’s worst months, it ran a back-page ad in the Ottawa Journal: “Let it snow! Let it rain! Canadian National’s Ocean Limited gives you fast train service to the Atlantic provinces . . .” On the front page of the same day’s paper ran this terse report from Halifax: “Canadian National Railways said today its Ocean Limited from Montreal will arrive here 24 hours behind schedule because lines had been blocked by the severe week-end storm.’’

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You’ve heard about all the stupendous deeds involved in getting the St. Lawrence Seaway built on schedule, in spite of all hazards, but bet you didn't know disaster was staved off in a small way a while ago by a small boy. He was eleven but not very big for his age—not as big as the other youngster he saw in front of him on the bridge over the Chateauguay River, just as this other youngster raised his arm to throw a rock. The rock was aimed at a seaman on the dredge L. Robidoux, working on a seaway channel directly below; but it never reached its mark because our hero knocked the offender’s arm down just in time. His reward was immediate, fitting and appreciated: the seaman chucked the lad a chocolate bar he'd been about to eat himself.

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The peewee hockey leagues are again going all out of course, with practice sessions and games scheduled literally from pre-dawn to dusk to work in all the teams. Vernon, B.C., youngsters are as hockey crazy as those any place and we’ve heard about a junior Beliveau out there whose team had to be on the ice at 7 a.m. Saturday, and who pledged his dad to waken him no later than six. Father was rubbing his eyes sleepily when he went in to call the lad but wasn’t too sleepy to notice the bedclothes looked awfully lumpy. Pulling them off he revealed the inert form of one small hockey player, fully clad, including shoulder pads, elbow pads, knee pads, sweater and hockey socks. No skates or stick—but they were right there within reach.