BACKSTAGE

Backstage IN EDUCATION

JOHN CLARE August 17 1957
BACKSTAGE

Backstage IN EDUCATION

JOHN CLARE August 17 1957

Backstage IN EDUCATION

Here’s a new way to beat the high cost of college

FOR A GROUP of adventurous young men at Waterloo, Ont., the time-honored enterprise of Working Their Way Through College will soon undergo a brand-new twist. Boys will work in teams of two like brothers to help each other become engineers. They’ll be employed as one by industrial firms. One boy will work for three months while the other goes to college, then they’ll switch assignments. The money they make jointly will pay tuition and living expenses for both. They’ll get grades according to their performance in both classroom and workshop. Beginning with grade 12 it will take them six years instead of the usual five to get a degree.

Seventy-two boys are in the first ex-

perimental class at Waterloo College, which is supported by the Lutheran Church. Each boy pays $200 a quarter while he’s at school, and lives for about $20 a week. The money he earns covers this, with something to spare, and he’ll earn more as he advances.

Most of the students applying for admission could not afford college except on a plan like Waterloo’s. They’re boys like Eugene Stampfer, 20, who taught for a year hoping to go to university when he heard about Waterloo, and Paul Siemens, also 20. who was working for an engineering firm when his boss told him about the new co-op course and urged him to take it.

The co-op plan was developed by J. G. Hagey, BA, one of the few col-

lege presidents who was once a public relations and advertising man, and Leslie Emery, first principal of the engineering school. Hagey was a Waterloo grad: after years in the ad business he went back five years ago as president.

He began to sell the college with fullpage ads. "We got results,” he says, “by telling young people what we could do for them.” He and Emery borrowed the co-op plan from similar ones at two U. S. schools. They’ve found industry. which has long complained of lack of technical help, enthusiastic. Today firms literally queue up for students.

Hagey expects to bring in 100 boys a quarter until 2.000 are enrolled, making Waterloo a major Canadian university.

JOHN CLARE