BACKSTAGE

Backstage WITH LABOR

How “moonlighting" is beating the fight for more leisure

SIDNEY KATZ August 31 1957
BACKSTAGE

Backstage WITH LABOR

How “moonlighting" is beating the fight for more leisure

SIDNEY KATZ August 31 1957

Backstage WITH LABOR

How “moonlighting" is beating the fight for more leisure

“MORE TIME TO RELAX” has become both a promise and a creed in this age of automation—labor unions fight for it—but more and more Canadians are defeating it by "moonlighting," a new addition to the language meaning to work at a second job after the normal day's work is done. Thousands work all day as teachers, bankers, bookkeepers and plumbers, then go to work at night and on week ends in supermarkets, garages and real-estate offices.

"Dual job holding is on the upswing,” says an executive of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association. One large loan company confirms it—ten percent of its clients are moonlighters.

By tradition, teachers have always

been moonlighters, working in summer holidays. They still are. They work after school hours and in summer as radio announcers, farmers, construction hands and insurance adjusters, in spite of the displeasure of school boards which think it infringes on school work.

Industrial workers too practice moonlighting. Labor unions and employers aren't sure of the extent of it, but one packinghouse company recently found it couldn’t call on butchers for overtime work because they were working for someone else after hours.

New companies have sprung up in Canada to provide moonlight help. The largest is Office Overload Co. Ltd., which has branches in Montreal, I oronto, Hamilton, Winnipeg and Vancou-

ver, with a pool of 20,000 workers— mostly women. They're TV entertainers, ballerinas and housewives doing extra jobs in business offices.

Labor and welfare officials decry moonlighting. “In modern industry a man needs time to relax,” says Murray Cotterill. of the United Steel Workers of Canada. “Children can be harmed by parents being continually away at work,” says Violet Munns of the Neighborhood Workers of Toronto.

But R. G. D. Anderson, general manager of Industrial Accident Prevention Associations, thinks the moonlighter can take care of himself. “He has initiative; his work and attendance records are good; he’s a good safety risk"

SIDNEY KATZ