Background

Background

U. S. IS OUR MEDICAL ANGEL

March 29 1958
Background

Background

U. S. IS OUR MEDICAL ANGEL

March 29 1958

Background

U. S. IS OUR MEDICAL ANGEL

Although Canada’s been taking most of the credit for Dr. Hans Selye’s medical findings at University of Montreal the U. S. has been providing most of the cash. Ottawa's grant to Selye has been about $30,000 a year, about the same as that of the U. S. army, but far below other U. S. agencies. Selye, pinched for funds for his efforts in heart disease (Maclean's, March 15) is looking for private backing.

WHAT! A TORY LAURIER?

Although most people in Quebec are hilariously aware that a Laurier (Henri, grand-nephew of Sir Wilfrid) is backing a Tory (Col. Pierre Sevigny) in the election, they don't expect his kinfolk to renounce him. The families have been friends since Sir Wilfrid led the

Liberals and Albert Sevigny, Pierre's father, followed Borden's Tory banner to become revenue minister.

YVON’S HOME TOWN MAKES GOOD

Prize-fight fans are getting a bang out of a new' name on the map of New Brunswick issued by the province’s tourist bureau. It’s Baie Ste. Anne, and light-heavyweight contender Yvon Durelle literally put it there. It’s his home town and mapmakers ignored it until Yvon began knocking over fighters.

“A parish priest suggested we put the name on the map,” said a tourist official. “He could have been a boxing enthusiast.”

RADISSON FLUFFS HIS HISTORY

Youngsters watching pioneer Pierre Radisson on TV think he’s not a bad hero, but they wish

film makers would get their history and props straight. When CBC asked for essays on TV shows here are some of the things the moppets pointed out; with Indians on the warpath there were billboards in the background; a CF-100 flitted past while Radisson blazed trail; the same bed of reeds appeared in wateredge shots “all the way from Nipissing to Montreal,” protested one boy.

BOOTLEGGING IN WHEAT

On our wide wild prairies a really determined man has unlimited opportunities, especially in such spacious activities as rustling and bootlegging. This time it’s different—wheat bootlegging. Farmers with surplus grain sell to grain-short farmers who sell to the elevators on their quota. It’s illegal, but the Wheat Board doesn’t often holler for a posse, especially w'hen the bootlegged wheat is bartered for machinery or a car.