Background

Background

TOUGHER TESTS FOR SOLDIERS

July 5 1958
Background

Background

TOUGHER TESTS FOR SOLDIERS

July 5 1958

Background

TOUGHER TESTS FOR SOLDIERS

This will get a laugh from all sergeants, but you have to be smarter right now to get in the army. With a 20% jump in applications for enlistment this year (the recession, say army officials), they’ve toughened the "M,” or intelligence, test to cut down on the normal 600 recruits a month and accommodate soldiers who want to re-enlist. All three services are close to peak strength (total: 120,000) and are enlisting only 1,200 a month to fill gaps.

3 LEFT-HANDED PROVINCES

Police in Ontario, Alberta and Newfoundland have at least one more worry than other cops. There’s no

“wrong” side of the road in those provinces. This came to light only recently when editors of Imperial Oil Review checked the background of a drawing by C. W. Jefferys showing a 19th-century stagecoach on the left-hand side of B. C.’s Cariboo Road. Was Jefferys wrong? No.

B. C. law ordered traffic to the right in 1920. From time to time, so did other provincial laws—but not those of Ontario, Alberta and Newfoundland.

HORSE RETURNS TO KITCHEN

Last year’s drought in the U. S. southwest is now putting horsemeat —up to now a slightly tawdry wartime memory—back on some Canadian tables. Here’s how: the drought decimated U. S. beef herds, with the result that exports from western Canada this year have reached record levels. Beef prices

have soared. In Vancouver five horsemeat butcher shops are thriving. In one shop sales jumped from 1,500 pounds a week in January to 4,000 pounds a week in June. The obvious reason: a spread of about 20c a pound between beef and horsemeat.

ST. PIERRE VA DE GAULLE

Whatever Charles de Gaulle’s troubles in France or Algeria, he’s apparently solid in two little bits of France that are almost a part of Canada—St. Pierre and Miquelon, the French islands off Newfoundland. Maclean’s associate editor John Clare, who was at St. Pierre at the height of the crisis, reported: “To most islanders De Gaulle is their country’s last chance. The island's three representatives in the home government all backed De Gaulle on the advice of their constituents.”

WHO’S FOR FLUORIDATION?

Although no decisive blows are being struck in the battle of fluoridation, the pros are winning some ground. According to a Maclean’s survey, one in eight Canadians now drinks fluoridated water, almost double the number two years ago. The mostfluoridated province: Manitoba where half the people (444,640), including those in Winnipeg, drink fluoridated water. Toughest battlegrounds: New Brunswick, P. E. I. and Newfoundland, where the pro-fluoridation forces haven’t gained an inch.

LONDON’S HIGH HIGH LIFE

Canadians looking for a cheap holiday on an advantageous money exchange and low prices in Britain are being disillusioned this year. U. K. prices are up 25%: better-class hotels,

$15 a day; better meals, $15 for two; „“cheap” London taxis aren’t anymore.