BACKSTAGE

BACKSTAGE WITH THE OUSTED CABINET

What’s happened to the 21 top Liberals who used to run the country

March 28 1959
BACKSTAGE

BACKSTAGE WITH THE OUSTED CABINET

What’s happened to the 21 top Liberals who used to run the country

March 28 1959

BACKSTAGE WITH THE OUSTED CABINET

What’s happened to the 21 top Liberals who used to run the country

MOST OF the twenty-one men who ruled Canada twenty-one months ago, have so totally disappeared from the news that many Canadians are already having trouble remembering their names. Only six of the former Liberal cabinet ministers—Lester Pearson, Paul Martin, Jack Pickersgill, Lionel Chevrier and Paul Hellyer— and Sen. W. R. Macdonald remain on the federal scene as members of the opposition.

The others have quietly returned to jobs similar to those they left before entering politics and, according to a Maclean’s survey, most of them are not only happy to be out of public life, but they're also earning more money.

Prime Minister St. Laurent is back in the Quebec City law office he abandoned in 1941 to become Mackenzie King’s minister of justice. “Most of my work is as a consultant. I do no court work,” he told Maclean’s.

C. D. Howe, the Liberal’s controversial trade minister, is now chairman of the board at Price Brothers, the Montreal paper

firm, and director of a dozen other large Canadian corporations. His earnings have increased since leaving public life.

Stuart Garson, the former justice minister, is back in the Winnipeg law firm he left 22 years ago. “I am busy and happy,” he says, “and my family is getting reacquainted with the gentleman who. to win their bread in public life, had to become somewhat of a stranger.”

Former agriculture minister James Gardiner is raising Shorthorn cattle and Yorkshire pigs on the farm at Lemberg, Sask., that he bought when he entered politics 45 years ago. "I am happy here,” he says.

Jimmy Sinclair, the Liberals’ fisheries minister, now is president of the Fisheries Association of B. C. “I am better rewarded for my efforts than ever in public life,” he told Maclean's. “I have no desire or intention of returning.”

Former labor minister Milton Gregg, who was for a year the U.N. representative in Iraq, now is with the International Labor Organization in Geneva. “My pay is comparable to my cabinet post,” he says.

J. J. McCann, the Liberals’ revenue minister, is a director and vice-president of Guaranty Trust,

in Ottawa. “Politics,” he says, “gave me 22 years of responsibilities and little compensation.”

George Prudham, the former mines minister, is the head of his own lumber supply company in Edmonton, and has returned to politics in a minor way by getting a seat on city council.

Jean Lesage, once northern affairs minister, is devoting all his time to leading Quebec Liberals.

Former ministers who have returned to their law offices include: Walter Harris in Markdale, Ont.; Ralph Campney in Vancouver; and Ernest Lapointe, in Quebec City. Ex-works minister Robert Winters has a $30,000-a-year job as head of the Rio Tinto mining interests in Canada.

George Marler, formerly the transport minister, is now a vicepresident of the Liberal Federation in Ottawa. Roch Pinard, the Liberal's last secretary of state, is back in his Montreal law practice. “I would be much happier,” he says, “if the Tories were sent back to the left side of the Speaker.”