PREVIEW

A LOOK AT TOMORROW IN TERMS OF TODAY

The search for Canada's oldest heroes Expect lots of mosquitoes at your cottage

May 23 1959
PREVIEW

A LOOK AT TOMORROW IN TERMS OF TODAY

The search for Canada's oldest heroes Expect lots of mosquitoes at your cottage

May 23 1959

A LOOK AT TOMORROW IN TERMS OF TODAY

PREVIEW

The search for Canada's oldest heroes Expect lots of mosquitoes at your cottage

ALL EYES WILL BE ON THE PAINTINGS when field-portraits of the two Canadian medical corps officers who won VCs in World War I are presented to the Queen Mother this summer. But the artist is worth watching too. She’s Brenda Bury, a 26-year-old Londoner who’s probably today’s best-looking if not best-known portrayer of world celebrities. Her portrait of Prime Minister Diefenbaker now hangs in the Senate. This spring she got an even rarer opportunity: to Shes a picture, too paint Quebec’s publicity-shy Premier Maurice Duplessis. Brenda’s made news before — by getting a portrait in England’s Royal Academy at 21 and by appearing in a student delegation to Sir Winston Churchill dressed in fish-net tights, sequins and feathers.

CANADA’S BOER WAR VETERANS — now mostly in their 80s — will gather in Toronto this October to mark the 60th anniversary of the outbreak of fighting. Organizing the banquet is Major E. L. (Mickey) McCormick, who as a 14-year-old bugler-orderly in the Strathcona’s Horse was among the youngest Canadians to go overseas. How many are left? McCormick's trying to find out. But he’s advertising the reunion in dozens of newspapers. Boer War veterans will soon join Spanish-American War vets as the continent’s oldest military heroes. There’s just one U. S.

Civil War survivor alive. He’s I 16.

OUR SELF-CONSCIOUS COMMUNITY SINGING will have a standard to match after Labor Day weekend. That’s when 3,000 lusty-voiced Welsh singers will gather in Toronto's Royal York Hotel. Excuse: North America’s 28th Gymanfa Garni (gam«/?va giuiee) — a festival of Welsh hymns and folksongs — being held for the first time in Canada. There’ll he no audience (no room) but the singing may be broadcast. One highlight will be an unrehearsed, 3,000-voice, four-part Hallelujah Chorus.

MOSQUITOES WILL BE PLENTIFUL this summer. Heavy snows left extra puddles for larvae to breed. Want to test near your cottage?

Just bare a forearm and count the landings per minute. Five is worse than average. But Arctic areas may run to a hundred this year. Encouraging note: None of our 12-plus species of mosquito is yet immune to DDT.

NEXT YEAR’S RUBBER-CHICKEN CIRCUIT is being sewed up by three Toronto women with a public-speaking agency called Canadian Celebrity Bureau. Director is Matie Molinaro. wife of a U. of T. professor. CCB’s already signed up some big drawing cards, will offer seasonal package deals or one-shot programs for service and luncheon clubs across the country. Our most popular lecturer? Sir Robert Watson-Watt, discoverer of radar, with fees up to $500. Close behind are TV's Larry Henderson and military expert Brig. Claude Dewhurst. Also on CCB’s list: Maclean’s movie-critic Clyde Gilmour, New Liberty editor Frank Rasky, speech expert Esme Crumpton and actress Susan Fletcher.

PRODIGY TO WATCH is Emmanuel Ax. blueeyed. freckled Polish pianist living in Winnipeg since February. He'll be 10 in June, but he’s already impressed Winnipeg Symphony conductor Victor Feldbrill. Emmanuel has absolute pitch; he played back perfectly chords Feldbrill hit at random. “He has real sensitivity as well,” says Feldbrill. Emmanuel’s father—a voice therapist in Poland — has the boy under wraps, won’t let him play publicly till 1960, except at weekly concerts for his fellow grade 3 students.

IF YOU DON’T LIKE THE SKIRL OF BAGPIPES, run for the hills or plug your ears this summer. The pipes are so popular now and so many new bands are starting that, by the end of the last royal tour parade, they'll be almost as common as pianos. Canada (with 500) and the U. S. now have more pipe-bands than Scotland. Pipers are so much in demand one band in Port Arthur, Ont., is advertising in Scottish newspapers.

Tyros can practice on an $8 chanter — same fingering, less noise.