MACLEAN'S ALBUMS

A new gallery of French Canadian PORTRAITS by French Canada's most famous photographer

JUNE CALLWOOD May 9 1959
MACLEAN'S ALBUMS

A new gallery of French Canadian PORTRAITS by French Canada's most famous photographer

JUNE CALLWOOD May 9 1959

A new gallery of French Canadian PORTRAITS by French Canada's most famous photographer

MACLEAN'S ALBUMS

The distinctive portrait gallery on this and the following pages fleshes out, with the names and faces of a dozen varied and vital people, the French part of Canada's double personality described elsewhere in this issue. They were photographed especially for this issue of Maclean's by a cameraman almost as renowned as his subjects: Gabriel Desmarais, whose portraits of international celebrities have made the bold signature "Gaby" famous. Maclean's left him a free hand, but added a rider. His subjects were to be interesting people who have made, are making or arc likely to make important contributions to Canada. A roll call of all the French-speaking Canadians who fit this description would mount effortlessly into the hundreds. Whatever the reasons — the

fervent Latin temperament is certainly one of them — a volatile strain of free-wheeling individualists has been flourishing in Quebec ever since the first generation of Canadiens. It's a strain that has produced saints — like Marguerite Bourgeoys: free-booting sinners like the epic adventurers Radisson and Groseilliers: nation-

welding statesmen, like Sir Wilfrid Laurier and Henri Bourassa.

Happily for the flavor as well as the future of Canada, the same strain is flourishing right now. Although the dozen representatives in this portfolio include prominent personalities in church and government, business, education. the arts and sciences, the choice is arbitrary and personal. Fven so. it shows clearly why the French, who have long been outnumbered in Canada, have never been outmanned.

PORTRAITS CONTINUE NEXT 4 PACES

s variety character of the Thirties. Fridolin, and s smash comedy of the Forties, Tit-Coq. This onth he is to produce a “somewhat serious” ama that he wrote himself. Then even the theatre 11 be his: the Gélinas-organized Comédie Canadine, which has been endowed by Gélinas admirers.

ss mind he first took to Paris in 1926, and the stinetion of being the only Canadian painter ever ven a retrospective show by France's National Muum of Modern Art. Pellan’s latest canvases, six which recently brought at least a thousand dollars ich are enormous, vivid, and three-dimensional, be secret: paint, canvas, and plaster applied with ich exotic instruments as a kitchen icing-squeezer.

driving energy. He's board chairman of two other corporations, president of eight, a vice-president of four, and a director of twenty-nine more, including the CNR and National Drug. One example of a spare - time Gagnon project: persuading Dow to give $350,000 to Montreal’s Comédie Canadienne.

Survenant. In a single English volume called The Outlanders. the two books won the Governor-Oeneral’s award for literature in 1950. By the time Marie’s TV run is over, Mme. Guevremont will have finished another — the last of a four-novel saga of Canadien life. Like the earlier books, it will be translated by a Londoner “because British English is closer to Quebec French than Canadian English is.”

JUNE CALLWOOD