Maclean’s Movies

Maclean’s Movies

CLYDE GILMOUR January 30 1960
Maclean’s Movies

Maclean’s Movies

CLYDE GILMOUR January 30 1960

Maclean’s Movies

CLYDE GILMOUR

BEST BET I’M ALL RIGHT, JACK: An Oxford-bred fugitive from industrial strife (Ian Carmichael) and three coy tennis players in a nudist colony are prominent in the large and somewhat frantic group of characters in this British satirical comedy. It weakens itself by refraining from establishing a valid point of view of its own, implying as it does that everybody on either side of the labor-management “war" is a crook or a fool; but the story is often wildly funny along the way. With Peter Sellers, TerryThomas, Dennis Price, Margaret Rutherford, Liz Fraser.

CASH McCALL: A dynamic glamor boy of high finance (James Garner) is the interesting but implausible hero of this Hollywood comedy-drama. He makes millions by knowing when to buy a company dirt-cheap and sell it at a huge profit. Natalie Wood. Nina Foch, Dean Jagger and Henry Jones are among the dazzled pawns whose destinies he juggles. Rating: fair.

EDGE OF ETERNITY: Some really breath-taking views of the Grand Canyon in wide-screen color compensate for an utterly predictable plot and a rather drab performance by Cornel Wilde as a sheriff tracking down a laughing gold smuggler (Mickey Shaughnessy).

LI’L ABNER: Al Capp’s raffish comic-strip world comes to life with enjoyable gusto in a Dogpatch musical based on the successful Broadway show. Whenever the story begins to bog down, another lively song-and-dance number gives it an invigorating lift. With Peter Palmer, Leslie Parrish, Stubby Kaye.

THE MIRACLE: Max Reinhardt’s famous stage spectacle of many years ago may have been a thing of magic in its day but the belated film stemming from it is dull, tasteless and at times ridiculous. It’s about a student nun (Carroll Baker) who runs away from a Spanish convent during the Napoleonic invasion.

NEVER SO FEW: Long and thickly involved is the story wrapped around Frank Sinatra as a tough little American army captain and Gina Lollobrigida as a rich man’s plaything during the worst days of the war in Burma. Good action scenes and some unhackneyed humor make the film worth seeing.

GILMOUR’S GUIDE TO THE CURRENT CROP

Anatomy of a Murder: Courtroom drama.

Excellent.

Beloved Infidel: Romantic drama. Fair.

Ben-Hur: Biblical drama. Excellent.

The Best of Everything: Drama. Fair.

The Bloody Brood: Crime drama. Fair.

Bohbikins: British comedy. Fair.

The Captain From Koepenick: German satirical comedy. Good.

Carlton-Browne of the F'.O.: British comedy. Good.

The Devil’s Disciple: GBS comedy-drama. Fair.

F'erry to Hong Kong: British comedydrama. Fair.

The F'BI Story: G-man drama. Good.

The 5 Pennies: Biog-musical. Good.

Girls Town: Reformatory drama. Poor.

A Hole in the Head: Comedy. Good.

House of Intrigue: Spy drama. Fair.

It Started With a Kiss: “Naughty” comedy. Good.

The Jayhawkers: Western. Fair.

The Last Angry Man: Drama. Good.

Left, Right and Centre: Comedy. Fair.

Look Back in Anger: Drama. Good.

The Man Who Couldn't Talk: Courtroom drama. Fair.

The Man Who Understood Women:

Romantic comedy. Fair.

The Mouse That Roared: Comedy. Good.

North West F'rontier: Action drama in India. Good.

The Nun’s Story: Drama. Excellent.

Odds Against Tomorrow: Drama. Good. On the Beach: Atom-survival drama. Good.

Operation Petticoat: Comedy. Fair.

Pillow Talk: Comedy. Excellent.

Porgy and Bess: Music-drama. Good. Pork Chop Hill: War drama. Good.

Room at the Top: Adult drama from Britain. Excellent.

The Scapegoat: Drama. Fair.

Sign of the Gladiator: Drama. Poor.

A Summer Place: Drama. Fair.

They Came to Cordura: Drama. Good. Third Man on the Mountain: Alpine

drama. Good.

—30—: Newspaper drama. Fair.

Tiger Bay: Suspense drama. Good.

Upstairs and Downstairs: Comedy. Fair.

The Wonderful Country: Western. Good. The Wreck of the Mary Deare: Sea

mystery-drama. Excellent.