IN THE EDITORS’ CONFIDENCE

The writer who practises what he preaches

March 26 1960
IN THE EDITORS’ CONFIDENCE

The writer who practises what he preaches

March 26 1960

The writer who practises what he preaches

IN THE EDITORS’ CONFIDENCE

Writers have been known to stoop, on occasion, to producing articles on the benefits of reducing while they themselves continued to overeat and become more obese. They have also been known to churn out pieces on the advantages and pleasures of vigorous outdoor sports while they confined their own athletic pursuits to twisting television dials or turning pages.

We’re happy to be able to announce that a new contributor, Raymond Hull, definitely does not belong among the disreputable scribblers who advise others to do one thing while they, with a cynical disregard for their own advice, do something else. Raymond, come hell or high water, practices what he preaches. In our For the Sake of Argument (page X) he claims that while Canadians pay lip service to freedom, they don’t really want to be free. Instead, he says,

they are willing slaves, mainly concerned with avoiding responsibility and seeking security. He maintains that this is no sort of a life for a man with any spirit.

And does he shun such a life? The answer is a loud “yes.” Home, for him, is an old barn at Howard’s Point, B.C. He fixed it up comfortably by means of his own sweat and toil and sneers at people burdened by mortgages on ranch-type bungalows. In his barn, beholden to nobody, he can do what he wants, which is to write poetry, short stories, articles, TV plays, film scripts, stage plays. Some sell; some don’t. A barn-dweller doesn’t have to worry too much about the profit motive. A novel he wrote was spectacularly unsuccessful but it pleased him, which is what counts with an author who says the devil with keeping up with the Joneses.