ENTERTAINMENT

MOVIES: Clyde Gilmour

The pool-room prowess of Fats Gleason

November 4 1961
ENTERTAINMENT

MOVIES: Clyde Gilmour

The pool-room prowess of Fats Gleason

November 4 1961

MOVIES: Clyde Gilmour

The pool-room prowess of Fats Gleason

THE HUSTLER: Making one of his rare appearances on the full-size screen, TV funnyman Jackie Gleason is superbly suited to his role as a pool-table heavyweight champion named Minnesota bleak, realistic drama. Its characters. mostly unsavory but all interesting, include a hungry young' challenger for the title (Paul Newman), a suicidal alcoholic (Piper Laurie), and a gambler (George C. Scott) who dabbles in psychology.

THE TRUTH: Ostensibly a “serious” Brigitte Bardot picture, this French courtroom yarn offers the pouting sex-kitten as a Paris beatnik who goes on trial for the murder of her former lover. There are some powerful moments but the famous BB’s acting equipment fails to measure up to the requirements of the drama. She seems

more at home doing a slow-motion “haunch dance” in bed to the rhythm of her radio’s rock-’n’-roll.

THE DEVIL AT 4 O’CLOCK: A

bitter old priest (Spencer Tracy) and three convicts (one of whom is Frank Sinatra) risk their lives to rescue a colony of leper children from a volcanic eruption on a South Seas island. The story has its share of hokum but Tracy’s performance has guts and honesty.

GREYFRIARS BOBBY: Gilt edged for the kiddies, and for many a susceptible grown-up as well, is this Walt Disney presentation about a dog — a Skye terrier named Bobby —which refuses to leave the Edinburgh kirkyard where his old master lies buried.

And these are worth seeing: Breakfast at Tiffany’s Mysterious Island Paris Blues Spare the Rod Summer and Smoke The Young Doctors