MACLEAN'S REVIEWS

NEW MOVIES

CLYDE GILMOUR January 26 1963
MACLEAN'S REVIEWS

NEW MOVIES

CLYDE GILMOUR January 26 1963

NEW MOVIES

MACLEAN'S REVIEWS

CLYDE GILMOUR

THE LONGEST DAY: Producer Darryl F. Zanuck's three-hour documentary epic about the Allied invasion of Normandy on D-Day, June 6, 1944. The film skillfully sidesteps most of the land-mines which always threaten disaster to such a mammoth enterprise and is well worth seeing, although the sustained stereophonic bedlam on its soundtrack is tough on eardrums in the balcony.

IW IN SEARCH OF THE CASTAWAYS: This Walt Disney production is a rccommendable item under the heading of Family Entertainment — great fun for the youngsters with its preposterous adventures, and with enough tongue-incheek drollery to amuse their elders. The amiable cast includes Maurice Chevalier and Havley Mills.

j'TT' TARAS BULBA: Visual opulence and a corny script vie for supremacy in this costume swashbuckler, based on Gogol's Russian novel about 16th-century Ukrainian Cossacks and their tussles with the Tartars and the Poles. Yul Brynner is the brawling Big Daddy of the fearless horsemen, with Tony Curtis as a son who sells out to the enemy for passion's sake.

FW DIVORCE - ITALIAN STYLE: A sly and

lively comedy from Italy. Writer-director Pietro Germi’s target for satire is a loophole in Italian law which allows a husband to get rid of his wife (via the cemetery) if he catches her in adultery, although ordinary divorce is forbidden. Marcello Mastroianni, hitherto a jaded glamor-boy in his screen portrayals, is superbly funny as a middle-aged man who stage-manages his own wife's seduction by her ex-beau so he can marry his creamy young cousin. Naturally, there is a surprise ending.