MACLEAN’S REVIEWS

NEW MOVIES

CLYDE GILMOUR February 9 1963
MACLEAN’S REVIEWS

NEW MOVIES

CLYDE GILMOUR February 9 1963

NEW MOVIES

CLYDE GILMOUR

GIRLS! GIRLS! GIRLS! is a vacuous but commercially shrewd Hollywood comedy-withsongs indicating that Elvis Presley, now twentyeight, has succeeded in building up a new “image” almost totally different from that of the unkempt, loose-hipped hillbilly of 1956. Both his singing and his bodily gyrations have become comparatively demure, and you can even understand some of the words. He is courteous to all mankind, with a special flair for getting along with children and old folks, and in a fight his strength is as the strength of ten because his heart is pure. In his latest vehicle he’s a tuna-boat skipper and part-time troubadour, amiably determined to win back

a pleasure craft which once belonged to his beloved daddy.

¡¡Eg?3 GYPSY: There are one or two notably lively scenes in this Hollywood version of the Broadway musical, but Rosalind Russell strenuously overacts in the central role of a backstage mama whose tenacity is tigerish. Natalie Wood is a bit too skinny and a bit too sugary in her portrayal of that elegant but robust strip-queen, Gypsy Rose Lee. There is an honest performance by Karl Malden as mama’s longsuffering No. One admirer, who finally rebels.

IF#3 MUTINY ON THE BOUNTY: Without obliterating fond memories of the late Charles Laughton in the original 1935 edition. Trevor Howard turns in a craggy and powerful characterization that is the best ingredient in MGM's big-budget remake. Marlon Brando depicts the freedom-loving Fletcher Christian as a prancing dude, continuously interesting to watch but less believable, on the whole, than the stalwart sailor embodied by Clark Gable a generation ago. The panoramic color photography does ample justice to billowing sails, Tahitian scenery and gory violence afloat.