MACLEAN'S REVIEWS

NEW MOVIES

CLYDE GILMOUR September 7 1963
MACLEAN'S REVIEWS

NEW MOVIES

CLYDE GILMOUR September 7 1963

NEW MOVIES

CLYDE GILMOUR

SPARROWS CAN'T SING: Even for people weary of Britain’s kitchen-sink school of realism on the screen, this impudent Cockney comedy can be recommended as lively entertainment. It

marks the film-director debut of Joan Littlewood, already renowned for her stage productions of The Hostage and A Taste of Honey. The central characters are an exuberant sailor (James Booth), his plump little partridge of a wife (Barbara Windsor), and his bus-driver pal (George Sewell), who has been supporting the lady during her husband’s absence overseas. Some of the dialogue is a bit tough for non-Londoners.

EiP WINTER LIGHT: Sweden’s newest export by Ingmar Bergman unfolds a chilling but enigmatic story about a village pastor (Gunnar Björnstrand) who has gradually lost most of his faith in God and all of his ability to grapple compassionately with the problems of other mortals.