MAILBAG

A meaning in death? / Calgaryanks

November 5 1966
MAILBAG

A meaning in death? / Calgaryanks

November 5 1966

MAILBAG

A meaning in death? / Calgaryanks

I HAVE JUST READ the Two Stories About The Meaning Of Death. However disillusioning it may be, the story of “Roger” by Ian Adams expresses great sympathy and understanding. He provides a picture of the human condition with sensitivity. Death was not Roger’s final defeat, for Adams gives the memory of his life and the treatment of his corpse the dignity it deserves, the love and empathy so sought after by the living. Roger’s death is Everyman’s. And every death is brutal tragedy.

T. M. ABRAMS, MONTREAL

* I fail to see the purpose of the gruesome article by Ian Adams. Being a nurse and having seen many deaths, I did not think I was squeamish. But this left me feeling quite ill. If it contained a message, I failed to grasp it — other than perhaps giving people second thoughts about signing autopsy consents. The medical profession will bless you for that one! I hate to think of all the misery you may be causing people facing death in the near future.— E. SMITH, MONTREAL

* What useful purpose could be served by detailing in such a gross, crude and ghoulish manner the private, sacred and painful events connected with dying and the preparation for burial, I cannot understand. Such an example of irresponsible journalism I have not seen for a long time.

W. D. S. JAMIESON. MD, TORONTO

>k The accompanying article by Malcolm Muggeridge was worth the entire yearly subscription price. In eloquent language and with keen insight, he exposed the shallowness and emptiness of our socalled modern advancement and went to the heart of the real issues — why are we here, and where are we going? Thank you for this excellent article which expressed so beautifully the core of our Christian faith. — REV. OSIAH HORST, DAN-

FORTH MENNONITE CHURCH, TORONTO

Calgary under glass

Re Calgaryanks, by Jon Ruddy: It would appear that the author saw Calgary through the bottom of a bourbon glass in the Petroleum Club. We have many Americans here and we welcome them, but the figure of 30,000 is slightly exaggerated. There may be that many in the whole province, but they don’t all live in Calgary. — TOM AHEARN, CALGARY

* If Calgary’s American commentator. Clem Blakeslee, feels that Alberta’s government is dictatorial, as a citizen of Ontario I openly invite him to come here and live.

A. DAVID MaeDONALD, PORT DOVER, ONT.

* Tell Clem Blakeslee to mind his own damn business. Canadian problems are for Canadians only, not foreigners. To all those Yanks who have become Canadians, “Welcome.” To all the rest who haven’t. “Yankee, go home.”

PAUL DE GRANVILLE, SILLERY. QUE.

* Have discussed your article with several Calgarians. Result: you’re not winning! — GORDON WRAY, CALGARY

* Keep those Americans on the other side of the border. A lot of them are sex fiends.— J. J. WATSON. SMITHERS. BC

* The article demonstrates how serious the “invasion” of Canada by the U.S. really is. Whether they be oilmen, broad-

casters or university professors, most of these people represent the interests of the U.S., a foreign power seeking to control the vast resources of Canada and transform it into an American satellite. It’s time Canadians faced up to the situation before it is too late. — REV. DONALD D.

POWELL, THREE HILLS, ALTA.

Better than Canada

Your Editorial Keep A Sense Of Proportion About Pensions contains a remark so wide of the mark as to be laughable. I refer to: “Canada already does better by her senior citizens than any other country in the world.” I suggest you make inquiries about England, Ireland, Sweden, the United States and Israel, to mention a few.

C. G. CLEATHER, ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI

* Seventy-five dollars per month is a mere pittance for a man and wife together— which is what they must make do with if the wife is younger than the man. In my Old Country (Holland) man and wife each get the pension, no matter what the age of the woman, as long as the husband is 65. Here she has to wait, maybe five or 10 years before she also gets her pension. The elderly deserve better than they get now — a handout. A. J. BRINKER, SOUTH BURNABY, BC

* I take violent exception to your statement that Canada does better by her senior citizens than any other country in the world. I suggest you visit Sweden, Denmark and, particularly, Great Britain.

F. R. JOY, PARRY SOUND, ONT.

The jaunting 23

Your excellent Editorial, They Didn't Die To Make A Roman Holiday For 23 MPs, certainly exposes a serious weakness in present-day attitudes. With millions of dollars for Centennial projects, Canada Council grants, monuments and memorials, and now overseas jaunts of overpaid members of parliament, why not some consideration for the many lonely widows of servicemen left to face years of quiet desperation because of the sacrifices made by these men during Canada’s time of need? The time is long overdue for a complete overhaul of pensions and/ or allowances to veterans and dependents. MRS. J. D. SMITH, MOOSE JAW, SASK.

* That’s telling ’em. Very forthright of you. Bold! In fact, if you’d named the committee members your effort might have been worth the space the Editorial occupies. — P. BURNS, LONDON, ONT.

The 23 who made the European tour:

G. Lanie! (Lib., Beauharnois-Salaberry); P. Boulanger (Lib., Mercier); C. W. Carter (Lib., Burin-Burgeo): G. L. Chatterton (PC, Esquimalt-Saanich); G. D. Clancy (PC, York ton); G. Clermont (Lib., Lethelle); R. B. Cowan (Lib., York-Humber): F. J. W. Fane (PC, V egreville);

H. W. Herridge (NDP, Kootenay West); C. F. Kennedy (PC, Colchester-Hants); H. Latulippe (SC, Compton-Frontenac);

C. Legaidt (Lib., N¡pissing); J. C. MacRae (PC, York-Sunbury); J. E. Madill (PC, Dufferin-Sirncoe); M. W. Martin (NDP, Timmins); J. R. Matheson (Lib., Leeds); J. B. Morison (Lib., Wentworth); J. N. Ormiston (PC, Melville); A. B. Patterson (SC, Fraser Valley); R. Rock (Lib., Jacques Cartier-Lasalle); J. A. Thomas (Lib.. Maisonneuve-Rosemont);

D. R. Tolmie (Lib., Welland); R. A. E. Webb (PC, Hastings-Frontenue).

MAILBAG continued

Who should teach sex? / Drunk drivers / Want to buy Canada?

Lazy parents

As an elementary schoolteacher, I enthusiastically endorse Sheila H. Kieran’s Argument against teaching sex in the classroom (I Don't Want My Children Taught Sex In School — And Parents Who Do Are Deserting Their Duties). Teaching the moral facet of sex would be impossible for two reasons. Teachers,

like most other people, differ widely in their views on the matter. Much more important, morality isn’t some.hing one teaches with a pointer, pencil or parables. It is, rather, something learned from birth, by following good examples and by having one’s bottom well warmed when those examples aren't copied. The demand for sex education in the schools is simply another example of lazy parents

sloughing off their responsibilities on teachers. — GRAHAM WEEKS, MONTREAL

* Children do absorb their sexual attitudes. as well as their other attitudes, by listening to their teachers, no matter how wretchedly stumbling those teachers may be. What is so hilarious about a school board making a policy decision on what to teach children about contra-

Make ’em walk

My congratulations to Robert Malkin (One Man, One Wreck, One Cause) for his relentless efforts to get tougher laws affecting drinking drivers. We need laws so stiff that people will walk rather than risk arrest. Persons convicted of drunken driving, even if there is no traffic accident involved, should face licence suspension for a long enough period to cause hardship. And persons convicted after several serious previous offenses should never be granted a licence to drive again.

MRS. MARGARET YAPP, TORONTO

Buy back — with what?

ception, about whether “nice girls do. about sexual climax? These subjects deal with life as do the subjects of religion, history, science, biology, geography, etc.

MRS. VIRGINIA BLAKELEY. CHATHAM, ONT.

* Sheila Kieran’s article makes me sick. Not every child has perfect parents as hers do. We need help from every responsible agency. It is fatuous to suggest sex education must be either in the home or in the school, not both. In fact, both these agencies are far eclipsed in sex education by advertising, movies and TV. pulp literature. erotic magazines, fashions, literature, etc. In the face of such competition, what kind of dog-inthe-manger attitude does it take to say, “I'll fight them alone, even if it kills our CHILDREN.”-REV. ROBERT S. LEDER MAN.

REGENTS PARK UNITED CHURCH. ST. VITAL, WINNIPEG

Re The Sharp/Gordon Debate: Neither Sharp nor Gordon has the answer. If we are able to establish credit on collateral, we can finance all projects that are possible with our own labor and resources. Debt would be incurred only for imports. Elven though a new concept of money is necessary, the present machinery of our Bank of Canada and chartered banks are adequate to provide sufficient dollars. Just as credit is established for a borrower on his collateral (wealth), the banks could provide credit for public services and utilities, public or private. We Canadians must accept a new concept of our money system if we are ever to buy back our country.

HAROLD HUNTER, POWELL RIVER, BC

4= The basic conflict between these two gentlemen is as old as Canada itself. Gordon’s argument, a product of reactionary and contented Torontonianism, basically says, “Keep Canada for Canadians. It’s nice this way; let’s put a fence around it.” Sharp says in effect. “If Canada is to survive as a great nation, we must expand and grow and develop our great potential wealth. We cannot do this with our limited capital resources. Therefore, we must seek the help and co-operation of our good neighbors, the Americans.” There Is no other source. Are we too stupidly proud to accept the proferred hand of our half-sister?

MAC MCLEAN, LLOYDMINSTER. SASK.

He came, he went

I have just read, with something like disbelief. the article written by Douglas Marshall, The Man Who Didn't Stay For Dinner (Reports). I am appalled! How on earth does a man sell up in England, leave his job. drag his wife and baby 3.000 miles to Canada, spend 24 hours inside a house, and then traipse all the way back, declaring that he has no feel for the place? In my letters to the UK. I have been unable to keep my enthusiasm for Canada to myself.

W. E. HADFIELD, OTTAWA

MAILBAG CO nt ir j lied

Help for the old grey mare? I It's a big, big country, Bob

Expose, inspect — and stop

The hideous and obscene sources of estrogen have now been fully exposed to the light, thanks to your article The Old Grey Mare’s Worth Millions Now (Reports). 1 am seriously concerned for our people at this new evidence of their growing degeneracy.

GRETA G. CARROLL, NEW WESTMINSTER, BC

5k As a member of the Humane Society and the Canadian Wild Horse Society, I wish to thank you for printing the article. I hope science can solve this problem by coming up with a synthetic substance. In the meantime the government should make arrangements for these horses and their offspring to be protected by law and inspections.

MISS J. A. JELLETT, TORONTO

5k Hormone therapy is not important enough for animals to be cruelly exploited in this way. 1 am sure that most women, knowing the facts, would refuse medication produced on this basis.

GLADYS GODDARD, BROOKLYN, NEW YORK

* It is ironical that the same issue of your magazine should contain the two articles. Is God Obsolete? and The Old Grey Mare’s Worth Millions Now. From the point of view of the old grey mare who must endure such atrocious cruelty so that her pampered human counterpart can enjoy “an extended prime of life after her menopause,” God is truly dead and hell a reality here and now.

E. PRIDE, MONTREAL

What do you mean “Canada”?

1 have just finished reading Everything’s IJp-To-Datc In ’66, by Robert Thomas Allen. He is comparing Ontario with the United States and drawing the false conclusion that when he’s describing conditions in that province, he is describing Canadian conditions generally. He obviously hasn’t traveled in La Belle Province very much. Even our paved roads are in terrible shape.

CHRIS J. ALLEN, POINTE CLAIRE, QUE.

5k Allen makes the same mistake many easterners make from time to time — speaking for the whole of Canada. He speaks of the improvement in tourist accommodations in Canada, but he toured just two provinces. A few people from the U. S. visit western Canada, too. How about covering this area?

MRS. L. M. DOANE, EDMONTON

5k Practically no one in southern Ontario has the remotest idea that they only occupy one sixth of the area of the province. Allen traveled some 2,000 miles and found the worst of everything was in what he calls “northern Ontario.” He hadn’t even reached northern Ontario — he was still in southern Ontario by our standards. You have to go north of the Trans-Canada Highway to get to northern Ontario.

E. L. PALMER, DRYDEN, ONT.

5k In Florida, my husband and I found all the faults that Allen speaks of as Canadian.

MRS. H. R. MCCLYMONT, TORONTO

5k So Allen, still the reluctant Canadian, has now discovered that there are eating places in Canada on a par with those in the U. S. What a display of magnanimity! The admission might well have been made much earlier if Allen had taken the trouble to visit some of the areas well aw'ay from the mainstreams

of traffic in Florida, as I have done over the last few years.

E. L. O'LEARY. OTTAWA

A little learning . . .

June Call wood’s Is God Obsolete? made me think of a grade-11 poem that starts, “A little learning is a dangerous thing.” Her reference to Principal Lautenschla-

ger’s removal of “every book of radical theology from his library” is very misleading. What the United Church Observer quoted the principal as throwing away were his books of liberal theology. There is about 50 years’ difference between liberal and radical theology. Who ever heard of a scientist keeping a textbook over 50 years old? — G. A. D. SCOTT, EMMANUEL COLLEGE, TORONTO

=k I have come to the conclusion that “God” is really a name for the law and order under which this world operates and always will.

WILLIAM M. WRAY, CALGARY

* 1 wonder what God these clergymen worship. Surely not the God of the Bible. No question that God is alive.

MRS. HUGO WILSON, FOREST. ONT.

5k God is not obsolete or dead, because of Jesus Christ.

E. L. SHEARER, INDIAN RIVER, ONT. if