MAILBAG

Has CBC let us down? / How to survive college / Who’s afraid of The Bomb?

February 5 1966

MAILBAG

Has CBC let us down? / How to survive college / Who’s afraid of The Bomb?

February 5 1966

MAILBAG

Has CBC let us down? / How to survive college / Who’s afraid of The Bomb?

I heartily endorse union leader Henry Comor’s stand vis-a-vis the CBC (The Angry Hallad Of A Union Boss). I was considerably dismayed on reading the article to find how little the Canadian content is on CBC-TV in the variety and drama fields, and very disappointed that the CBC has let down myself and other long-suffering members of the TV-watching public.

K. M. MCMUI.I.I N, CALGARY

Loyola isn't what it used to be

Re Clayton Sinclair's The Nude Who Stayed Out In The Cold (Reports): I

would like to point out that Loyola College (to which the seventeen-foot reproduction of Michelangelo's David was sent| is no longer an all-men’s institution, as Sinclair states. I here has been co-education at the college since 1961, with an increasing number of women, from twenty-six to the present four hundred and fifty. An even larger number is expected this year. DAVID R. I AGII . I.OYOI A (HI I I (.1 . MON I RI XI

Too little — or too much?

In your Sacred Songs (h I Public Nuisance (Editorial), you deplore the “abuse" of sacred ( hristmas music by "merchants and other noisemakers" who begin playing carols earlx in December. Playing Christmas hymns "a million times over" is not a "profanation." as you call it: to the contrary, tiny beautiful

piece of music gains in beauty each time it is heard. Each year I look forward with great pleasure to the few weeks when Christmas carols temporarily replace the usual round of pop music. ELOISE BLAKE. WILLOWDALL, ON I .

* Let there be sung Non Nobis and Te Deum for your Editorial. One hears Christmas carols and hymns sung ad nauseam from November to late December and when the twelve days of Christmas come one can't even find a partridge let alone five gold rings. It is good to hear this sort of protest. — H. (.. n. RICHLY. HONORARY CURATE. ALL HALLOWS, LAST YORK. ON I .

Get lost, Hogan

Peter Gzowski has cleverly exposed the error of showing Hogan's Heroes on television (Smile. Hoys — It Never Was Worthwhile. Reviews). Many of the TV audience are too young to realize how far from reality the setting (a prisonerof-war camp) is. Gzowski's comments have helped crystallize the opinions of most decent people who want this program taken off.

WALLACT .1. TROUP. Ol I \WA

* An excellent article. I still cannot believe it possible that a program such as this can obtain viewing space, especially in a countrx like Canada where there are many people all too familiar with the unfunnx side of POW camps.

MRS. SHI IL A Hl I ION. O 1 I XXX X

4« Gzowski expressed in a manner that I have been feeling for a long time words that needed saying. I am constantly amazed at the light-hearted, off-handed way with which Americans treat the ugly, obscene and immoral conflict between nations known as war. It is perhaps due to the fact that this countrx has never seen the disaster that has been a part of the European consciousness. Americans, most of them anyway, feel

an overriding sense of duty. It is "my country right or wrong — my country." These absurd and immoral beliefs are only strengthened when programs like Hogan's Heroes are flooding the airways. Making war seem "glorious.” "fun." and full of memories subverts the very essence that this country was founded on. TER.II. I. I.EIRE.N, PASADENA, CAI IFORNIA

T Gzowski referred to The Wackiest Ship In The Army, as being run by a group of soldiers with a civilian adviser. He also states that Ernest Borgnine plays an "American non-commissioned naval officer" in McHales Navy. The Wackiest Ship is commanded by a U. S. Navy lieutenant and the crew is navy. I he "civilian adviser" is actually an army major. In McHale’s Navy Borgnine plays a navy lieutenant-commander.

JOHN II ARC I AY. OKOMOC TO, NB

Student crackups

I have read, not with surprise, but with great alarm, the frightening article written by Ben Rose. New Spectre On The Campus: Student Crackups. I am becoming acquainted with this spectre in a level below Rose's— to be precise, in high school. We have two children in high school, one of whom has just begun, the other having reached grade twelve. And the pattern is already being set. with increased nervous irritability in the younger and a sudden unaccustomed anxiety in the older. These may be normal and natural reactions, but the question is whether they are absolutely essential or desirable, and where they can lead, if they persist. It must be a disturbing aspect for a great many parents in a similar situation. Students are being implored to remain in high school, yet the inconsistency of encouraging dropouts by demanding just too much, continually exists. One cannot serve two masters well, it is said, yet these students are being asked to serve six. seven or eight!

MRS. REX HAGUE. TORONTO

4< University authorities who prescribe more counseling and more psychiatric treatment for students should try similar treatment for misfits on the teaching staff. This might break the vicious circle and produce a return to sanity.

A. .1. GOODMAN, CALGARY

* Rose gives an accurate description of what some students go through during college years, although those of us who have obtained degrees more easily still remember that time as the busiest and most exciting. If young people in college think they are having difficulty passing exams, wait until they try to raise children in the modern world! However, one solution to the Canadian problem might be to follow the lead of some American universities which use the quarter system. Students study a few courses for approximately three months at a time, can leave studies after one quarter and go to work or rest, then resume the following session. Under this sxstem, too. the university makes much better use of its facilities and professors.

MRS. .1. X. SHI R B A NT t K. XX ÍNNIPI (.

C Onix one percent, roughlx. of students currentlx entering university are really meant for academic universities. I hey are the ones who love learning for its ovxn sake. I he pills, crackups and suicides are Nature's way of dealing with situations entirely unnatural, of the young people forcing themselves (or

being forced by the pressure of their elders) into a situation Nature never meant for them.

MRS. I). EDMOND, VANCOUVER

That’s a Dali sheep?

The Dali sheep pictured in Slaughter In I lie NWT's Mackenzies (Reports) looks more like some animal from Mars than from the Northwest Territories. If this is truly a Dali sheep, it has surely suffered a fate worse than death. I have seen many of these beautiful animals in the Mackenzie Mountains, and they look nothing like that beast in your picture. Also, I must disagree with the negative attitude taken by zoologist AI Oeming and the author, Ron Hayter. Similar big-game hunting has been carried on in the Yukon Territory for many years with, to my knowledge, no adverse effect on the game population. As the Boone And Crockett Club, which is dedicated to conservation, points out. trophy hunting has, if anything, a beneficial effect on the game population.

DONALD .). TURNER, NAHANNI BUTTE, NXVT

Where’s Charley?

In What The World Was Like The Year Canada Was Horn you show photographs purporting to be Charles Dickens on the left, and Lord Tennyson on the right. I think Lord Tennyson is the one on the left, and Dickens on the right. Is this

SO? -— MRS. ELIZABETH .1. RUXTON, FAXVCETT, ALTA.

It is. Thanks to Reader Ruxton and the many others who wrote for drawing attention to the transposition of photographs.

The Bomb isn’t the villain

Re the article captioned on the cover "Ban-The-Bomb Burns" ( The General Who's Lighting Lor Peace): Surely we

have an erroneous view of the atomic bomb. We have enjoyed twenty-two years without a major war, although one may now be building up in Asia, and the credit for this period of peace belongs to the fact that Russia also has the Abomb. If the U. S. were the only country possessing the A-bomb, her foreign policy would have been insufferable and, long ago, she would have subjected Russia to the same sort of treatment now being handed out in Vietnam. It isn't the A-bomb we have to fear: it is the myriad of horrible TNT and Napalm bombs that rain from the skies killing thousands of innocent people. War should be confined to soldiers fighting on ground with conventional weapons. All forms of aerial bombing should be outlawed. The A-bomb, which is our last line of defense. will only be used in case of extreme provocation and it's very existence compels us to avoid the final rupture in international relations.

S. I . PARKER, VANCOUVER

Information please

I am at present working at the new Ontario Institute For Studies in Education (affiliated with the University of Toronto) on a biography of James L. Hughes (1846-1935). Inspector of Schools in Toronto from 1874-1913. I should be very grateful if anyone remembering Hughes would send me a note containing any recollections of him. or contact me at the Institute at 344 Bloor Street West, Toronto 4. It is also

important to the study that I see as many of Hughes’ letters as possible. These will be promptly returned, or. if desired, could be preserved at the institute. - B. N. CARTER. RESEARCH FELLOW.

THE ONTARIO INSTITUTE FOR STUDIES IN EDUCATION, 344 BLOOR STREET WEST, TORONTO 4

* It is proposed to collect, preserve and, in due course, to make available for research all letters, press clippings, photographs, films and other documentary material relating to the life and work of Jawaharlal Nehru. I appeal to all friends and admirers of our late prime minister to donate such material as may be in their possession. The material may be dispatched directly to the Nehru Memorial Museum & Library, Teen Murti House. New Delhi-11. India. Alternatively, the Indian High Commission, 200 MacLaren Street, Ottawa 4, Ont., would gratefully receive this material and arrange to forward it to India. The original documents will be returned to those who desire to have them back; to others copies will be supplied for RECORD.-B. R.

NANDA. DIRECTOR, NEHRU MEMORIAL MUSEUM & LIBRARY, NEW DELHI-1 I, INDIA

The teach-in that was

As writer Dave Jackel points out in That Was A Teach-in That Was — Or Was It? (Reports), the list of speakers at Toronto’s International Teach-in was weighted in favor of the Left. There is no reason to suppose that this imbalance was unavoidable. If the organizers had chosen to do so, they could easily have recruited a spokesman for the "hard" anti-Communist position. Senator Dodd of Connecticut, Senator Tower of Texas, the editors of Canada Month, William E. Buckley, Frank Meyer and James Burnham of National Review — these are only a few' of the articulate anti-Communists who might have been invited, and I have personal knowledge of the fact that at least one of those I have mentioned would have been willing to take part. — K. H. XV.

HILBORN, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY, UNIVERSITY COLLEGE: OF ARTS AND SCIENCE, UNIVERSITY OF WESTERN ONTARIO, LONDON, ONT.

What’s Martin?

In Exit Gordon, Nobly: A Hard Act

To Follow ( Backstage At Ottawa, Reports), Blair Eraser in writing of who will seek the office of prime minister after Pearson, states that “Paul Martin will undoubtedly be a contender." However, later he states that "no ErenchCanadian contender is mentioned nowadays." Who could be more French Canadian than Paul Martin?

M. M. BEATON,SASKATOON

An invasion we don’t need

Re your article on Japanese trade with Canada, A Japanese Invasion Canada Welcomes (Reports): Actually, the Japanese are exploiting our natural resources. which future Canadian generations may need, and in return we are urged to buy shiploads of manufactured goods which undersell our own. They need our raw materials but we do not need all the Japanese products that fill the counters of our stores today. A little Japanese competition may be all right, but the present situation is unfair to Canadian labor.

JOHN GRIFFITH. VANCOUVER -fa