MAILBAG

Sic ’em, Philip! / Courageous runaways / What’s it cost to live? / Teenage confusion

May 14 1966

MAILBAG

Sic ’em, Philip! / Courageous runaways / What’s it cost to live? / Teenage confusion

May 14 1966

MAILBAG

Sic ’em, Philip! / Courageous runaways / What’s it cost to live? / Teenage confusion

In Is Philip Really Necessary? Dennis Eisenberg observes: "With all his dashing charm goes an aristocratic arrogance ... Newsmen . . . have often felt the whiplash of his tongue.” I suppose it's natural that a reporter would think that reporters and photographers can do no wrong, and that people in the public eye, like Prince Philip, should uncomplainingly put up with the indignities and inconveniences inflicted on them by the gentlemen of the press. However. I for one do not blame the prince at all for any of his remarks on this subject; in fact. I admire his self-control in not saying a good deal more! — MKS. I . WAKEED ID. VANCOUVER

2k Sir Winston Churchill could be very stinging with his remarks, but this attribute was never held against him. As a successor to Sir Winston I would almost say that Prince Philip fills the role better than any contemporary British politician in Britain. - R. SCOTT. TORONTO

The runaways

One cannot help admiring the qualities of pluck and determination that enabled the four Balent children to leave their destructive and deteriorating Montreal home atmosphere to establish themselves in one of peace and possible opportunity in Vancouver (We Ran A way To Freedom). However it is disturbing to think that such a web of deceit should have been planned deliberately and perpetrated by children, or that such a way out of their dilemma should have been necessary. — MRS. A. ROBERTS. TORONTO

* Maria Balent has shown more courage. more selfless love, more common sense, more ability to raise children and live independently within her means, than most of us will ever learn to do. BARBARA M. DUNCAN. MARKHAM. ONE.

$111 is minimum?

Dave Hunt tells us (Reports) that Winnipeg’s Age and Opportunity Bureau has decided that an old person needs $111 a month as “the absolute minimum . . . to live with at least a measure of independence and self-respect.” Your heading asks: “Could you live on $111 a month?" The fact is. many do on much less. There are comfortable housekeeping rooms to be had in any city in British Columbia for thirty-five dollars per month. Twenty-five dollars per month spent sensibly at any chain food store will provide ample food for an elderly person. Perhaps twenty dollars would cover clothing and shoes.

.1. I*. LAMB. FULFORD HARBOUR. BC

Freedom coming?

In your Editorial Get The Rabies To Those Who Want Them, you say. " I he best thing for teenagers is still to teach them that parenthood is a job for married couples. This is not only old-fashioned morality, it is simple common sense." Surely you do not really think that unmarried teenagers want to become parents? They do have a strong and perfectly natural desire for satisfaction of their sexual appetites. Our society does all it possibly can to whet these appetites, and then takes no responsibility for the inevitable consequences. Now,

because of development of modern birthcontrol methods, the teenage girl is on the threshold of freedom from this terrible injustice. The only obstacles to bc overcome are the loud, self-righteous voices of the so-called moralists who confuse virtue and sin. Sooner or later, these obstacles will be overcome and all women, married or not, will have the freedom that men have always enjoyed. Is this immoral? Wars have been waged for less important freedoms than this. DOROTHY J. CURZON, BELLEVILLE, ONE.

Hackles raiser

Re Explore Canada '66: We like W. (). Mitchell and Edward McCourt for liking Salmon Arm and the Shuswap. But mention of the Okanagan canal causes our blood to boil and hackles to rise. We don't intend to have our lake drained for such a project. McCourt remarks: "No one in Salmon Arm appears to have heard of town planning." We don't like rows of houses, looking as though they have been plopped there by a cookie cutter. — ALIXE: CARTER, SALMON ARM. BC

2k There is an omission in the calendar of activities in British Columbia in '66. The Canadian Open Championship will be played at Shaughnessy Golf & Country Club in Vancouver. September 29 to’ October 2. This is a $ I ()().()()() golf championship, one of the major annual sports attractions in Canada. — PETER J.

(.. BENTLEY. CHAIRMAN. 1966 CANADIAN OPEN CHAMPIONSHIP. TORONTO

2k Mention should be made of the mammoth BC Square Dance Jamboree, to bc held in Penticton August 8-13. This jamboree is the largest of its kind in Canada.

MRS. FERNE. LINDI BURGH, PENTICTON. BC

>k I was deeply concerned that absolutely no mention of any events scheduled for Nelson, BC. appeared in your listing.

R. A. DENISON. PUBLISHER, Till NELSON ADVERTISER. NELSON, BC

Oar calendar had space for only a cross section of the hundreds of events between May and September listed by the Canadian Government Travel Parean. Tims not only Nelson bat many another proud community did not make the list. Here, for example, is what's going on in Nelson this summer: May. Kootenay arts and crafts show; Dolly Varden spawning run. July 4-9. midsummer bonspiel. square-dancing jamboree. July 11-Aug. 6. international ice-lux key clinic. July 16. water pageant and boat show. Sept. 3-5. Labor Day golf tournament. Sept. 4-5. Labor Day weekend celebrations. Highland games and dancing, band competitions. Sept. 22. RCMP musical ride.

The ugly shadow

James Bannerman’s overlong review of Truman Capote's In Cold Blood (Capote’s Unanswered Questions, Reviews) is a little sickening, especially when he suggests that the two murderers were homosexuals. Constant spouting on homosexuality has cast an ugly shadow on all girl-girl and boy-boy friendships. One doesn't dare have a buddy anymore for fear of the interpretations that might bc

continued on page 37

Stop whispering—shout! / The money makers / No hyphen: French is French

put on th; relationship by sick-minded vultures.

MRS. ANNA DONALDSON, EDMONTON

Just keeps rolling along

It’s said :hat the U.S. faces a water shortage aid has designs on Canadian water resources (Water Crisis Coming). What is the U. S. planning to do with the 371 million acre-feet of water discharged by the Mississippi River every year? — MRS. E. ROSS, CALGARY

* The U.S. is greedily eyeing our northern water resources and referring to them as a “continental resource.” Eventually (and it appears the Americans have already started vis-à-vis the NclsonSaskatchewan basin development) they’ll be trying to convince Canada that it is our duty, and for our own good, to develop, jointly, our own rivers and lakes in a manner that will benefit the U. S. as well as Canada. If this comes to pass, no doubt Canada will get the short end of the stick AGAIN.-D. HAWORTH, MOOSE

JAW, SASK

* Let influential voices be raised — and quickly. We must not sell our water. We must not yield to the U.S. our last shred of autonomy. You say that though Canadians resist the U.S. overture, the Americans “haven’t got the message." Of course — we are whispering when we should be shouting.

MRS. N. HUBELIT, TERRACE BAY. ONT.

The folding stuff

Despite the amount of homework Elizabeth Gray must have done for her article on counterfeit notes (Phony $20 Hills: Our Big Growth Industry, Reports), she still shares the widespread delusion that the Royal Canadian Mint produces our paper money. Surely she might have spotted the imprint. “Canadian Bank Note Company Limited,” or “British American Bank Note Company Limited"? - G. R. L. POTTER, PAST PRESIDENT.

CANADIAN NUMISMATIC ASSOCIATION. OTTAWA

* She might have pointed out that a “three-dimensional engraver’s plate" produces raised printing, whereas offset printing is flat. This is easily apparent if one runs a fingernail over the border of a genuine note.

JOHN R. WOOD. COLLIN'S BAY. ONT.

Hogwash, Holmes!

In his Argument, Jeff Holmes says the French spoken in Quebec is FrenchCanadian French, interjected with a certain amount of jouai — French-Canadian slang (They're Speaking A Language All Their Own In Quebec). To say that a French Canadian addressed in "French French" becomes offended is just so much hogwash. French thaï is taught in Quebec is French, without the hyphen; the dialects and pronunciation vary throughout Quebec, the same as in France (and much more so in England).

WALTER S. WHITE. STE. ANNI 1)1 SORI E, QUE.

* Just how large a bet is Holmes willing to make that no “English University" in Canada offers a course in FrenchCanadian literature? I took just such a course at the University of Toronto, and French-Canadian literature is also given at Waterloo University College, where I am now teaching.

JOHN F. PATTERSON, KITCHENER. ONT.

* As an adult undergraduate student at York University, I am proud that I will be able to take French 305 next year, which is “a study of the main FrenchCanadian literary movements and the French language in Canada." However, as a Torontonian who endured Ontario's insufficient and inefficient teaching of French French long enough not to pass it in grade 13. I would like to second

Holmes's arguments about the teaching of French. Since high school I've lived and worked both in Quebec and in France, so that I now manage quite well in either place. It is because of these experiences that I have been arguing for years that Canadian French, which is as living, dynamic and respectable a language as is Canadian English—each of which has developed so as to express our

special traits and the beauty of our culture and country—should be given its just recognition, instead of deprecation.

ALAN MOON, TORONTO

* French literature is being taught at the University of Toronto and there are programs of French-Canadian studies at Western and at McGill. Holmes refers to Mr. Roch Valin as “director of the language department at Laval University." Mr. Valin is director of our department of linguistics. There is quite a difference between a language depart-

ment and a department of linguistics.

JEAN l)AR»EI.NET, DEPARTMENT OF LINGUISTICS, UNIVERSITÉ LAVAL, QUEBEC CITY

* It is most disturbing that Maclean’s has published so narrow-minded an Argument, which will surely not be of any help to Canadian unity. We of Quebec may say to our fellow French Canadians that some of them speak jouai, but it is not fair that somebody else seizes on that and argues before our Englishspeaking fellow compatriots that such is our usual language. Frenchmen from France, even from Paris, understand us as well as we understand standard French. There is no fundamental distinction between French French and the so-called French Canadian. - HON. PAUL

LESAGE, JUDGE OF THE SUPERIOR COURT, COURT HOUSE, QUEBEC CITY

* I have never had difficulty communicating with people from France. Holmes gives the example of the woman on the telephone saying “why” for oui. He should know that this is vulgate and is comparable to our saying in English “yeah” instead of “yes.” No educated French Canadian would dream of pronouncing oui as “why.” What Holmes has done, in effect, is attribute a difference resulting from level of usage to a basic difference in pronunciation between the two forms of French. - MRS. ANNE STOKES, TOWN OF MOUNT ROYAL, MONTREAL

What’s a car clinic for?

RE “CAN CAR CLINICS KEEP GARAGE MEN

HONEST?” (Reports): WE RISE TO THE

DEFENSE OF THE NEIGHBORHOOD MECHANIC, WHO IS AS HONEST AS ANY OTHER CANADIAN. WE HAVE GOOD AND BAD, HONEST AND DISHONEST IN EVERY PROFESSION — AND THE ELECTRONIC DIAGNOSTIC CENTRE IS NOT GOING TO CHANGE HUMAN NATURE. ITS MAIN PURPOSE IS TO PROVIDE A MORE ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, MAKING IT POSSIBLE, IN EFFECT, TO ROAD-TEST CARS INDOORS AND REVEAL FAULTS PREVIOUS INSTRUMENTATION MADE MUCH MORE DIFFICULT TO UNCOVER. THE DIAGNOSTIC LANE IS REVOLUTIONIZING THE REP AIR-SF.R VICE BUSINESS, PROVIDING MORE PRECISE TESTING EQUIPMENT WITH A SPEED OF DIAGNOSIS THAT BRINGS DOWN THE COST TO WITHIN THE MEANS OF THE AVERAGE CAR OWNER. — ALAN K. REDNER, PRESIDENT, BEAR EQUIPMENT AND SERVICES LTD., TORONTO.

Problem must be faced

Re Insane Killers At Large: I feel strongly that the public needs much more information about the psychopathic personality. It seems pathetically true that many parents of imbalanced children refuse to face this terrible problem.

S. STEVENSON, LONDON, ONT.

Why blame the lawyers?

In Why Our Antiquated Laws Don't Work, Allen Linden deplores the oldfashioned and time-consuming methods employed in searching titles, based on what he has observed in Ontario. He should be reminded that Ontario is not Canada. In the west we have the Torrens System. In Saskatchewan one can search a title in minutes — just about as swiftly as getting a jet reservation. I question if the lawyers’ attitude is the main obstacle to law amendment, which is not their business. True, some court customs are archaic, but if we compare the conduct of business in our courts with that in

Are lawyers dragging their feet? / Who’s pushing Seven Days? / Protest!

* The following motion was passed unanimously by the Students’ Council of the University of Victoria: “That the

CBC be commended for the production of the program This Hour Hus Seven Days and that the network resist all public pressure to cancel this program."

KATHLEEN HARVEY, SECRETARY, ALMA MATER SOCIETY. UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA

Will it do any good?

Your article on the annual slaughter of seals (The Bloody Smear On Our Image Overseas. Reports) was excellent. The question is: will it do any good? I used to be a sealer on one of the larger vessels out of Newfoundland, and reports about the excesses of this massacre called "hunt" arc justified. Clubbing may fracture a seal’s skull, but the animal lives on for hours.

W. SCH MIDI. MONTREAL

* Are Canadians harboring leftovers from the staff of Dachau and Belsen concentration camps?

GLADYS GODDARD, BROOKLYN, NEW YORK

* Those who prey on such helpless, appealing creatures are without conscience or morality. 1 hope animal lovers will join in a storm of protest.

MRS. FRANCES CAMPBELL, HAMILTON. ONT.

* I am quite sure the blow would instantly kill a much larger animal than a baby seal. In any case, the first cut of the knife in skinning is at the throat, and such a cut is usually fatal to any animal. That the industry is a cruel one I will not deny, but so is the butchering industry. I have seen hundreds of seals killed, and I have never seen any evidence of deliberate cruelty by any sealer.

FRED W. B. SMEATON, GANDER, NFLD.

* We women have it within our power greatly to reduce the demand for animal

our legislatures, there is something to be said for the courts. Why blame lawyers for public apathy and legislative lethargy?

J. F. MCKAY. REGINA

* In criticizing the registry system. Linden referred specifically to the York County Registry Office, of which 1 was the registrar for more than eighteen years. Linden greatly exaggerates — he suggest the whole system is archaic, and ignores the modern machinery now employed and the many useful changes in the Registry Act that the Registrar's Association has done much to bring about. Linden rightly says "the attitude of the legal profession is one of the main obstacles” to further improvement. I suggest that lawyers should consider charging for the work that they actually do, not a flat 1'4 percent of the price of the land, when the search is a tax title that takes them only twenty minutes and is confirmed by statute or is under the land titles system and does not need to be searched at all.

W. I. HEARST, TORONTO

Antidote for brainwashing

Alan Fdmonds reports in The Show That Survives By Success Alone that some of the CBC top brass would like to put This Hour Has Seven Days off the air. 1'his program is, without doubt, one of the best the CBC has ever offered. It can do wonders, if left alone, toward getting people to think for themselves and to resist U. S. brainwashing.

MRS. MARY B. MARTIN. NEW LOWELL. ONT.

skins, simply by refusing to buy them. This is my resolve.

LORNA E. ELLIOT, HAMILTON, ONT.

* Surely in this civilized age something can be done to prevent such cruelty. MRS. G. M. LEVELL, INNISFAIL, ALTA.

* The killing of young seals is a disgusting business and the cruelty can be

stopped within the territorial limits of Newfoundland. The real problem is that ninety percent of the seals are killed outside the jurisdiction of Newfoundland. sometimes one hundred miles or more away: which means that the only way to regulate the killing and preserve the seals from extermination is by way of international agreement. 1 think that this can be brought about between the

main nations now engaged in the business — Norway, Russia and Canada. The trouble is that no one really took any interest in this horrible business until a few years ago when the humane societies brought it to light. The Canadian government has been apathetic about the whole thing. Now with the existing publicity, the Department of Fisheries may be driven into activity by commencing negotiations for an international agreement. — .1. DE N. KENNEDY. EDITOR.

CHITTY’S LAW JOURNAL. PETERBOROUGH, ONT. ★