MAILBAG

MAILBAG

May 2 1966
MAILBAG

MAILBAG

May 2 1966

MAILBAG

Is our water really ours? / They do so teach “French Canadian” / Don’t mess with Batman

I ENJOYED YOUR varied and colorful Explore Canada '66 travel report, and in particular admired the photograph on your cover. But you didn't tell us where the picture was taken.

P. D WILLIAMS, TORONTO

Peter Varley's photograph shows Lunenburg Nova Scotia, taken from a stretch of sea grass across the harbor.

The big giveaway

I appreciated your article on the question of future use and control of Canada's water resources (Water Crisis Coning). However, since we have already started giving our water away, it is rather late to be worry ing. I he Columbia River water was sold for a mere pittance, and we will come to regret it some day. Canadians are just too lazy or s upid and cannot see past their collective noses. We have been selling our natural resources, one by one, for years, not stopping to realize that the Americans are waxing fat while we are being bled white.

WILLIAM .1. DLL GRANDI;. CALGARY

Y I cannot imagine anything more contemptible or un-Christian than the statements attributed to Arthur Laing. John I in ner and a few others to the effect that they are opposed to letting the United States have a share of our northern fresh water, renewed every spring from the melting of the snows of the Rockies, but nearly all of which now is going to waste by flowing into the Arctic Ocean or Hudson Bay. I regard our fresh water ( from the rivers at least ) as a continental resource, and not for Canada alone. I would advocate that we give our U. S. neighbors all the water they want, provided of course that they pay the cost of having it piped or diverted to them.

J. R. MORRISON. LINDSAY. ONT.

Y Your article is so very, very true. For the sake of our grandchildren, keep hammering this message home.

W . II. CONKLIN. MLADOWVAI.I . ONT .

You’ve got takers, Holmes

In his Argument. They're S[leaking A Language All I heir Own In Quebec. And It's Time All Of Us Did Something About It. Jeff Holmes says. “I'm willing to bet there isn’t an Fnglish university in Canada that offers a course in French-Canadian language, or. for that matter, literature." I'm afraid Holmes has lost his bet. A course in FrenchCanadian literature is a very real thing to approximately one hundred and twenty students at St. Patrick's College in OTTAWA.-MARY RAT w in I AN. OTTAW A

Y Bishop's University. Lennoxville. has a course in French-Canadian language.

w . ( . I I It f R I Y, MAR HI ! TON. QUI .

Y Dalhousie offers to its senior French students a "General Survey of FrenchC anadian Literature.”

HON IT A MILLI R, ARMDAI.I. NS

Y Of course there are French-Canadian literature courses offered at F.nglishC anadian universities. Such bastions ol VVASPishness as McGill, for instance, feature an entire program in French-

Canadian culture, and even that staid old country club, the University of Western Ontario, quietly conducts classes in what is'known affectionately as French 38. the literature of French Canada.

MARA CAT TURIN! HROMII A. LONDON, ONT.

Y Marianopolis College offers a course

in French-Canadian literature. We also have a program in French-Canadian area studies (history, political science, sociology. etc.).-MRS. GLORIA I. I’ll RRL,

ASSISTANT IO rill RRLSIDINI. marianOROI IS COI l i e,!;. MON I RI AL

* I am a student at Queen's University and among my courses is one in FrenchCanadian literature.

JULIA HI RKA . KINGSTON. ON I .

Y As a student at the University of British Columbia. I would like to draw to your attention that in the UBC Arts calendar for 1965-66 the following course is listed: "French-Canadian I iterature — a study of characteristic works from the Conquest to the present."

1 . VOLKOFF, VANCOUVER

Y The University of Manitoba is presently offering a second-year Arts course in French-Canadian literature. I am enrolled in the course at United College, a University of Manitoba affiliate.

1.10 J. DF.SROCHFRS. WINNIPF.G

Gleeps, Gzowski!

TV critic Peter Gzowski implies that Batman appeared in Dell comics ( Reviews). Gzowski should realize that people who take culture seriously may not appreciate this little joke of his. Batman appeared in Detective Comics. which came out in Canada under the "Superman DC" label, not Dell, and neither Gzowski nor anyone else should treat this fact lightly. Dell published fink y tilings like Donald Duck and Mickey Mouse—in other words, the sort of thing our parents approved of—but they never ever had anything good, like Batman. - G. ALAN ROHISON. VANDI R-

HILT UNTAT RSITY. NASHVII.I.F. TT NN 1 SSL I

This is a library?

Re Herbert Irvine. Benevolent Despot of Decor. So a well-appointed house in Toronto's fashionable Rosedale section contains a bookless library. At least, that seems to be suggested by your photograph. A charming concept — so "in" and "with it." too.

M. HRODSKY. LONDON, ONT.

Relax. There are plenty of books, but thevre on a wall not shown in the photograph.

Babies have rights, too

Re your Fditorial. (let The Babies In 'Those Who Want Them: Simple common sense, as suggested in your last paragraph, is indeed for the unmarried mother to give tip her baby to a home with two parents: but the demand for babies for adoption has decreased over the North American continent while the supply has greatly increased. I here is publicity on the need for adoptive parents. qualifications have been relaxed,

MAILBAG

continued

and there does exist an interprovincial agreement to even out the supply of babies, with the demand, provincial and religious laws permitting. However, the problem should be attacked at both ends. Quebec laws and policies are strong for the rights of parents, hut perhaps the laws could he changed to have more regard for the rights of the children. When the supply of illegitimate babies outruns the demand for adoptions, the less-than-perfect babies are left to grow up in foster homes, with little security, at a cost to the taxpayer for each child of some eight hundred dollars a year, or fourteen thousand dollars until the child is eighteen. Surely, to prevent such human stress, birth-control advice should be available for teenagers and for adults, since the results of the modern morality are too much for “old-fashioned moral standards.”

JANI I M. HAWORTH. MONTRI AL

The bloody smear

Bravo! Maclean's, for your courageous exposure of conditions in the sealing area off our eastern coasts ( The Bloody Smear On Oar Overseas linage. Reports). Fvery reader should write to the prime minister, or the minister of fisheries, protesting these intolerable and barbaric practices.

MRS. J. V. HILL, TORONTO

>k Women’s organizations should urge a complete boycott on all products made from the fur of baby seals, thus removing incentives for such barbarism. GORDON JUDD, VANCOUVER

5k If the Canadian government and apathetic citizens are unconcerned about the inhumane slaughter of seals, perhaps an aroused world opinion will force a change to a cleaner kill—or a replacement in the Department of Fisheries. GORDON SMITH, WINNIPEG

5k I was horrified. To commit such an act against any living thing is positively APPALLING.-JEAN SCHUBERT, TORONJO

5k Congratulations on your article. All those who care could stop putting money into the horrible red hands of the seal hunters by refusing to buy any article made of sealskin, including those cute little bloody ookpiks with their soft brown EYES.-F. J. BETHEL, OTTAWA

5k The degree of civilization of a country may well be gauged by its concern for the nonhuman element of its society. The state of official Canadian concern in this respect seems to call for a royal commission. Dealings in animals for material gain, for exploitation, for human food, for cosmetic, drug and medical research, and for the satisfaction of sadists and other criminals, seem to have reached an all-time low. Quite a few decent-minded people — both in Canada and abroad—will await with extreme interest reports on the “humane” slaughter of seals for 1966.

MRS. J. C. DOUGLAS. HALIFAX

>k The use of baby-seal pelts should be as illegal as the use of Bird of Paradise plumage. Skinned alive or not, their slaughter in sight of their mothers is brutal savagery. To pity them is not sentimentality. Canada does not need money earned in this way.

MRS. J. M. GILLISON, WEST VANCOUVER

5k I can't take this despicable, cowardly, wholesale butchery any longer without adding a protest against this unbelievable and "indescribable mess” This

Now hear this, CBC! / Roulette’s still a gamble / Education: a U.S. failure

* A show of this type is needed in Canada to stir people out of placid ruts to do something, if only a little thinking. Seven Days appears to be the only masscommunication program that dares to criticize and poke fun at the Establishment. The loss of the show would be a great loss to Canada and Canadians.

M. R. HIGGINS, NELSON. RC

T Why does our CBC have to be so frustrating? It had better leave us some of the programs we sec regularly, or there will be rumblings of discontent across the land.

MRS. W. FRANCIS, DUNDAS, ONT.

Anybody got a doughnut?

Nicholas Steed's Taking 'I he Gamble Oat Of Roulette (Reports) w-as probably read avidly by thousands of blithe spirits who have nurtured lifelong ambitions to break the bank at Monte Carlo. Before too many of them book passage to try out Kurt Weber’s $3,000 system for getting rich quick, 1 think it only fair to warn them that the whole article is unadulterated nonsense. Weber's system is one in which you win more often than you lose. The kicker, of course, is that when you lose, you lose enough to more than offset all your winnings. I bet two bits to a doughnut that this year Weber comes home broke.

J. MCINTYRE, POINTE CLAIRE, QUE.

* Weber must really be gullible if he paid $3,000 for the system: it has been around for at least twenty years and has lost more money for system players than there is in Fort Knox. He states that you should bet only on black. It is all the same thing if you use black, red, odd, even or high and low: they are all evenmoney chances.

G. M. TUTHILI, LONDON, ONT.

The better BA

1 am distressed by Blair Frasers implication in Who's Uneducated.' The Boss, That's Who (Reports) that Canadian management is less well educated than its American counterpart. I his assumption is based, apparently, on the number of American and Canadian businessmen in management positions who have the BA degree. But the American BA is in no way comparable to the ( anadian BA. It is rather on the level of Canadian secondary education. 1 received my own education in Ontario primary and secon-

cave-man brutality, allowed in this day and age. makes me deeply and grievously ashamed to be a Canadian.

MRS LOA MARIE KELLS. PORT COLBORNE, ONT.

Mere Days wanted

Re The Show That Survives By Success Ahne, your report on TV’s This Hour Has Seven Days: It's about time we were blessed with a program that disregards sacred cows. We are a little tired of being served lukewarm facts, so censored that they’ve become CBC interpretations, not facts. 1 sometimes feel that to the CBC a sacred cow is any issue that may raise a few eyebrows, or cause the wrong executive or MP to suffer guilt pangs. If the CBC removes Seven Days from its programming because it is afraid of the consequences of the show, then it is not only letting a television audience down, but a country as well.

HELEN CARTER, IROQUOIS FALLS. ONT.

dary schools, with a BA and an MA at the University of Western Ontario and later a PhD at Columbia. I then taught for five years in American undergraduate institutions (which, incidentally, are always called “colleges.” the term “university” being reserved in the United States for graduate - level work). The differences between these institutions and Canadian universities are startling and

profound. The American who is about to enter college has spent three or four years less in the classroom than the Canadian at the same point in his education. and thus in time alone is three or four years behind. This deficiency is brought about through the shortness of the school day and year in the United States. The American school day is an hour shorter, the school year is one

month shorter, and high school is a full year less. When one considers the matter of quality, the deficiencies of American pre-college education become even more apparent . . .The main function of American colleges is to fill up the academic gap left by the high schools — in other words, to provide the general education that is provided in Canada and other Western democracies at the secondary level. Whether they succeed in even this modest aim is highly questionable. Serious work is disdained for the most eontinneil on page 46

The west-where the leaders are I The plane that doesn't need an airport

part, and the time is spent in vast survey courses from which the students learn to speak glibly with a smattering of misinformation but do little else. Specialization in the Canadian sense is not attempted. Please do not encourage Canadians to emulate Americans in education. Education is the Americans’ most dismal failure.

MARII GO I I . 1*1101 NIX. ARIZONA

Of all places, indeed!

Robert Stamp's Argument that Canadians don't know who they are because the schools and universities haven’t told them has a measure of validity, but he fails to provide us with even the semblance of an answer. He does, however, provide us (unwittingly) with a clue to our disjointed Canadianism when he

states, "file exception to this historical isolationism is, of all places, the prairies.” If Stamp were more aware he would know that the prairies have been leaders in educational and other social advances for quite some time. I recall a conversation with a noted professor of education at the University of Saskatchewan: an outstanding graduate of the University of Berkeley in California, he

remarked that he had chosen to teach at the University of Saskatchewan because it was one of the few places on the continent where new ideas would be accepted. That phrase “of all places" is Stamp's admission that he is just another Canadian who does not know who we ARE.-MKS. II. VAN DYCK, TORONTO

What’s the CF-5 for?

I am surprised by Peter Brannan’s uninformed report on the purchase of the CF-5 for the RCAF ( The Fuss Over ()m New Jet. Reports). FI is comments about this aircraft's operational capabilities below twenty thousand feet are pitiful. I he aircraft with the greatest speed and an air-to-air missile will win every time.-RONALD Ii. MCQUIGGAN. OTTAWA

Writer Feter Hrunnan replies: "Mr. McQuiggan is mistaken about the CF-5's role. The RCAF isbuying it as a ground-support tactical airplane, not as an air-to-air interceptor. The improved version of the Northrop F-5, the F-5N (or CF-5) selected by the RCAF, has increased power and a two-position nosewheel. which will elevate the nose and increase the angle of attack of the wings for takeoff. These modifications mean that the CF-5 will not require an airport at all. It will be able to take off from semi-prepared strips in forward conduit areas. For this reason its bases would be far less vulnerable to attack than those of most contemporary higher performance aircraft.”

White superman?

Why do you insist on oversimplifying a very complex situation through the adolescent expedient of hero worship? You featured a stellar example under the title For Once, An Indian Saga Without Shame (Reports). Your reporting reiterates what is institutionalized in other communications media. Truc, I have only been an Indian for twenty-three years. Perhaps I have been wrong in thinking of this land as home in terms of thousands of years, rather than less than one hundred. It is always encouraging to learn how the white superman will come to our savage or povertystricken or drunken homes and take us by the hand to lead us to the light. I do not know Mr. Garth Crockett, new Indian Affairs regional community development officer for reservations in Manitoba. If one man alone could accomplish law and order, set up a pulpwood co-operative, wild rice and fishing co-operative, and streamline an Indian band council, I suppose he deserves to be canonized by Maclean's. But if. by chance, those accomplishments were not those of one man, why was he the only one mentioned by name?

JANET F. SPENCE, SHELLHROOK, SASK.

U.N.C.L.E.'s no Danger Man

Your TV reviewer Peter Gzowski speaks of Danger Man being the British counterpart of The Man From U .N .C .L.E., and refers to its “tongue-in-cheek" adventures (Reviews). U.N.C.L.F. is comic - strip level. Danger Man is straight spy adventure. done with éclat, and by far the best program of its kind.

HARRY STEPHEN. HALIFAX

Nickel still has a ring to it

Paul A. Gardner says in New Orleans, Oui — Mardi Gras, Non, that New Orleans is the only city left in North America that still has nickel telephone calls. Here in Lloydminster. we still dial for a nickel. — RALPH CHAMHERLAIN,

LLOYDMINSTER. SASK. if