NEW WEAPONRY IN THE WAR ON ULCERS

HAL TENNANT August 1 1968

NEW WEAPONRY IN THE WAR ON ULCERS

HAL TENNANT August 1 1968

NEW WEAPONRY IN THE WAR ON ULCERS

Right from the start, it’s been a bad day. You began it all at breakfast by screaming at your kids, "Eat your *%#&*%& Captain Crunch!” Then there was that ape with the ball-fringe on the back window of his Chevy who almost sideswiped you on the way to the office. Then your secretary spilled coffee all over that report you were writing, then your boss came in for a Casual Chat about something you’d been putting off for three weeks, then your wife phoned about the way the vacuum cleaner was suddenly making a funny whining sound, then the alumni association sent you a snotty letter saying it’s your solemn duty to kick through with a contribution, ( then it was almost noon and you hadn’t done a thing, and then — STOP! Look, you’ve got to slow / down! Cool it for a minute. Relax. How? Simple. / Executive pacifiers, several of which are / shown on these pages, aren’t guaranteed to / reduce tensions. Just the same, hundreds / of executives are buying them and using • them as more than mere conversation ,* pieces. Men really do play with these • toys, and the effect, they’re • finding, can be soothing. .*

For starters, how about this little exercise in problem-solving? Simply arrange the four cubes so that every facet (top, two sides, bottom) displays all four colors. Here, one side facet is correct, but the top facet is wrong. You’ll find the third facet much harder to arrange without disturbing the first two. And the fourth facet is always — well, the name of the game pretty well says it: Instant Insanity.

This so-called Tension Tester, made In Toronto by A. B. Lash, is really just a $10 icebreaker — but often that's what a harried executive needs. Batteries keep the light blinking constantly, and when you get your visitor to touch the terminals at one end “to test your tension” (or “personal magnetism” or “sex appeal” or whatever) the blinking suddenly goes double speed — and you and your visitor, amused by now, find it aimost impossible to get snappish with each other.

HAL TENNANT

Finding it hard to bounce back after a rough session at that planning meeting? Well, you don’t have to make it all alone. Here’s Superball, on hand to help. Bounce it around a few times and be amazed, time and again, at its awesome vitality. Engrossing? Why, among Superball devotees, the envied executive is the one who doesn’t have a carpet on his floor.

What now? The boss just announced he’s shelving that project you've been working on for the past six months? What to do? Grab hold of the Little Worrier — $4.50 at Birks. (As you can see, he clearly looks like your boss.) Now squeeze hard, wind up for a solid overhand pitch and SMASH it against the far wall. Gad! You feel better already!

All right — hands up everybody who can recite Newton’s Third Law of Motion. What — you can't? It’s the famous one about action and reaction being equal and opposite.

And you can see how true it is when you play with the Swinging Wonder. Pull a couple of the heavy metal balls back in an arc and let them swing down to strike the others. Presto! With a smart clicking sound, the two balls at the other end obediently swing out. The energy has passed through the centre balls without their showing more than a ripple of movement. Now this pair swings back to transmit the energy in the opposite direction.

And notice something else: you’re starting to relax.

This one’s called the Fiddler, and all it does is sit there, waiting for you to joggle its doughnut-shaped magnet. When you do, it emits a mysterious beep, beep, beep. But isn’t it consoling to realize that some of the newest wonders of modern science are more fidgety and less useful than you are?