REVIEWS

FILM

Kaspars Dzeguze January 1 1970
REVIEWS

FILM

Kaspars Dzeguze January 1 1970

FILM

REVIEWS

A Married Couple: Allan King has snatched some incredibly intimate, agonizingly real moments from the lives of a suburban Toronto couple and assembled them into a magnificent documentary that turns the wide screen into a mirror for the audience. The film makes actors and scripts all but obsolete.

Easy Rider: Enjoy the comic talent of Jack Nicholson, the stoned charm of Dennis Hopper and the naïveté of Peter Fonda, but remember that the trio’s cinematic freedom to do “their own thing in their own time,” without studio interference, is of greater significance than the film’s flawed artistry.

Alice’s Restaurant: An

idyllic truce in the midst of the war of generations gives time enough for Arlo Guthrie and his gentle friends from a deconsecrated church crash-pad for soulweary flower children to commit the anti-social act of dumping refuse on a holiday. It’s a rococo tempest in a garbage dump.

Goodbye, Mr. Chips —

Peter O’Toole makes for a commendable old schoolmaster, but the addition of unwieldly songs and Petula Clark to sing them deflects the film away from Chips and his pupils, and pushes it into the pretty realms of devoted domesticity.

Paint Your Wagon —

Hollywood’ collositravaganza for 1969, a genuine musical cinematic dinosaur, deserves your attention in the same way that Mount Everest does — because it’s there. □ —Kaspars Dzeguze