YOUR VIEW

March 1 1974

YOUR VIEW

March 1 1974

YOUR VIEW

Nixon’s seventh crisis

Superb clarification of the incredible mess in Nixon’s Washington was provided by Canadian investigative reporter, Stephen S. Leopold, in Inside the Watergate hearings (December). Again and again, Leopold’s careful factual story underscored the truth that Nixon’s ethics parallel the American Stephen Decatur’s who said, “ . . . My country [My President!], right or wrong.”

To that immoral slogan Carl Schurz, Civil War general and friend of Lincoln, long ago made the appropriate reply: “Our country [our President], right or wrong? When right, to be kept right; when wrong, to be put right.”

CARLTON F. WELLS, PROFESSOR,

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, U.S.A.

As an avid follower on television of the Watergate hearings, I was more than ordinarily interested in the splendid article by Stephen S. Leopold in your December issue — Inside the Watergate hearings.

It amazed me that a young man of 21 could write in such wonderful literary style and with such cogent reasoning. I was impressed, too, with the initiative and tenacity this young man displayed in reaching his objective to attend the hearings, at which he volunteered to wörk in an unpaid capacity!

GEORGIUS FOSTER, VICTORIA

Odd man in

I must make a slight correction to Betty Jane Wylie’s account in your December issue of my part in the selection of Robin Phillips as artistic director of the Stratford, Ontario, Festival. As she says, I was asked to ad-

vise the committee responsible for choosing a successor to Jean Gascon. But my brief was to advise them only about British directors who might suit the job — for advice on other directors, Canadian, American or whatever, they went elsewhere. I wouldn’t have been competent to compare the merits of the British directors I suggested with those of any other country, and I wasn’t asked to. So that my “orientation toward the British rather than the Canadian theatre” was taken fully into account, and can scarcely have influenced the committee in its final choice.

Having grown up in Canada, though, I felt it part of my job to recommend directors not only for their general talent and experience with Shakespeare (the festival’s staple product) but for qualities which, I thought, made them likely to understand, fit in and get along with Canadians. In that category, Robin Phillips headed my list and, for all I know, this may have weighed as much with the committee as my opinion that, in Phillips, they’d be getting the most brilliant young director to emerge in England since Peter Brook.

RONALD BRYDEN, ROYAL SHAKESPEARE COMPANY, ALDWYCH THEATRE, LONDON, ENGLAND

Let me put Stratford’s plight in the proper light: nobody any good inside Canada would have wanted the job, without major changes in the Festival’s structure and programming. Nobody any good outside the country really wanted the job, unless they were interested in autopsy and embalming. Of the two possibilities, a Canadian would have known quicker and better than a foreigner how to readjust Stratford to the Canadian reality, therefore somebody from inside the country (good or bad) posed the greater threat. But somebody really outstand-

ing from outside might also have stirred up the Festival’s solidly mediocre management, and some of those 700 people Mrs. Wylie refers to might have had to go. Seen in this perspective, the appointment of Robin Phillips is ideal.

PETER HAY, FORT LANGLEY, BC

Together we stand

It was with considerable interest that I read Alexander Ross’ column, Soft lights and a soft sell seduce a city (January), dealing with the street lighting on north Yonge Street in Toronto.

Since 1972, our association has been aware that the lights along Yonge could be changed from incandescent to high-pressure sodium. In June of 1973, we presented a deputation to the Committee on Public Works. At their meeting of June 9, 1973, City Council, being very much aware of the concerns expressed by our association and others, voted to retain incandescent lights. The September vote at Public Works and City Council was confirmation of this earlier stand.

While it may be dramatic journalism to make it appear that one lonely individual fought all that opposition to retain the present incandescent street lights, this does not adequately convéy the interest and concern by many individuals. Incidentally, the final vote was recorded with Mayor David Crombie against retention. GEORGE D. MILBRANDT, VICE-PRESIDENT, BEDFORD PARK RESIDENTS ASSOCIATION,

TORONTO

Food for thought

I read the article by Sondra Gotlieb A feast from the roots (December) with great interest. It is very refreshing to learn that, after all, “multiculturalism” is not an empty word. At least in Toronto and some other bigger centres of ethnic settlements it begins to show itself in a positive way. I am grateful to you for recognizing this fact of Canadian heritage and giving it some publicity.

IVAN SHUMUK, PORT ALBERNI, BC

Enjoyed the article A feast from the roots in your December issue, written by Sondra Gotlieb. However, I take objection to her use of the word “perogies” in describing a Ukrainian dish. There is no such word in the Ukrainian language — the proper term is “pyrohy.” One does not twist around the words “chop suey” or “lasagna” so why twist pyrohy?

I feel so strongly about this that, as

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a matter of principle, I do not patronize any establishment that advertises “perogies” as such.

Your author’s use of the term “holubtsi” for cabbage rolls is correct.

J. W. EVANISHEN, WESTBANK, BC

Body talk

How magnanimous of you to put my head on the body of a nude, 300 pound Sumo wrestler in the January issue.

I should sue you guys for defamation of physique.

Look, what you did was false and “lowered me in the minds of the right thinking members of society.” That’s the classical definition of defamation so you should be more careful.

But forget about classical definitions . . . my mother had an anxiety attack when she saw it, girls won’t go out with me any more, and people who meet me for the first time ask, “Is that what you looked like before you lost all that weight?”

DANNY FINKLEMAN, THIS COUNTRY IN THE MORNING, CBC RADIO, TORONTO

Godspell

There are two points in Penney Kome’s article Joy in bad times which I take objection to. Ms. Kome did not take the time to interview anyone at the church about Scientology, as she did with the other religions that she wrote about. The personality test that she wrote about is not Scientology, it is merely a public service offered by the church.

As to Ms. Kome’s pointing out the cashier’s booth at the top of the stairs in our church, I again feel that this is an unfair criticism. The Church operates a flourishing bookstore from which we sell hundreds of our religious books each week. The cashier’s booth services the sale of these books and is not the point of our church as Ms. Kome implies in her article.

Other than what I have previously

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written I did enjoy the article Ms. Kome wrote and feel that it is indeed a validation of the spiritual outlook of today.

REVEREND GARY A. JEPSON, RESIDENT MINISTER, THE CHURCH OF SCIENTOLOGY OF TORONTO

The inscrutable east

Regarding Heather Robertson’s latest television column, Kung Fu and the cult of the gentle hero (January). She states that Caine (of Kung Fu) leads a “life of celibacy.. .” Well, perhaps your critic should know of what she speaks. (But then, she knew absolutely nothing of life on the prairies and she wrote a whole book.)

If celibacy still means staying away from pleasures of the flesh, then Ms. Robertson obviously doesn’t watch the show that she describes. Out of the last three episodes, Caine has, in one, slept with a very exciting and sexy young Chinese woman (and the night love scene left not too much to be imagined) and, in another, traveled with a “free woman,” who called him her latest lover, etc.

Ms. Robertson, again you are in the dark.

MRS. M. HOMBERT, ALSASK, SASK.

Learning the ropes

Our apologies to Isolde Savage of Liverpool, NS, for failing to credit her fine example of textile art which accompanied Helen Duffy’s predictions in the January issue.

More! more!

Congratulations on your December issue. The articles in there are tremendous, and I bought one dozen extra copies to give away to my relatives in their Christmas stockings!

ATTORNEY JOHN E. SATO, STENEN, SASK.

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