Canada

Four Horsemen: the chief, the cop, the hawk and the spy

May 31 1976
Canada

Four Horsemen: the chief, the cop, the hawk and the spy

May 31 1976

Four Horsemen: the chief, the cop, the hawk and the spy

Commissioner Maurice Nadon A taciturn, 55-year-old, who two years ago became the first French-Canadian chief of the RCMP, Nadon seems to in; spire trust and has become adept at avoiding pitfalls of his demanding job. Born in Mattawa, Ontario, he served as a crack Mountie detective in Vancouver, Montreal, Quebec City and Toronto before going to Ottawa in 1972 as deputy commissioner for criminal operations. As commissioner, he has helped quell widespread unrest on the force by fighting for substantial raises and overtime pay. He was also instrumental in bringing about the RCMP’S crackdown on whitecollar and commercial crime— a thrust that led to widespread charges in the dredging industry last spring and in the current Sky Shops affair. Nadon tends : to accept both praise and blame with equal imperturbability, but the Sky Shops case has twice in the past six months put him on Pierre Trudeau’s carpet. His career is obviously intact, however. Due to retire this ; year, Nadon’s term has been extended to September, 1977.

Assistant Commissioner J. P. Drapeau As chief of the Mounties’ Quebec division, Drapeau, who was born in Hull, Que., may have the toughest task of any Mountie in the near future: protecting the Montreal Olympic Games from trouble. Drapeau, 49, joined the force in 1946 and is what the Mounties call a “policeman”—an officer who works his way up. He commanded the Moncton, New Brunswick, subdivision before being posted to Montreal in 1972. He recently won respect within the force during the bruising row between the RCMP’S commercial crime section and the Quebec attorneygeneral’s office over what charges should be laid in the Sky Shops affair. Drapeau firmly held that at all times the force must act to avoid any suspicion of bowing to political pressure. Drapeau is due to move to Ottawa later this summer as deputy commissioner for criminal operations and is being tipped as a possible successor to Nadon—even though that would mean two francophone commissioners in a row.

Deputy Commissioner Peter Bazowski A Mountie “hawk,” Bazowski is a cigar-smoking, no-nonsense disciplinarian who since 1972 has been the force’s deputy commissioner for administration. That post gave him the power to decide on the transfer of officers around the country—a principal source of friction in the RCMP. A hard-line opponent of any move toward collective bargaining by Mounties, and a foe of bilingualism, Bazowski now is slated to move to British Columbia as head of the province’s 4,000-member Mountie contingent. A move to defuse tension on the force? No, insists Commissioner Nadon, it is a move to upgrade the RCMP’S relations with the provinces. Born in Vonda, Saskatchewan, Bazowski served as a Second World War RCAF flying officer, joined the Mounties in 1947 and rose rapidly, becoming one of the first members of the force to be sent to college. Says a Mountie officer: “Bazowski is not concerned with compassion. He’s more like a hard-nosed businessman, and he’s sold his soul to the RCMP.”

Lieut.-General Michael Dare

As director-general of the RCMP’S security service, the brawny, 58-year-old Dare supervises all of Canada’s internal security investigations. Lately he has been keeping a lower-than-usual profile while the Mounties try to find out who leaked a letter in which Dare asked for instructions on screening Quebec separatists seeking federal jobs, a leak that drew the wrath of Pierre Trudeau. Dare first came to Ottawa’s attention in 1970 when, as vice-chief of the Armed Forces Defense Staff, he smoothly organized troop movements during the 1970 FLQ crisis. Later, he helped Ottawa plan for similar future crises, then in 1973 succeeded John Starnes in the security service post. Montreal-born and raised in Brantford, Ont., Dare won the DSO in France in 1944 and later served in Korea. His straightforward military ways have not always gone down well along Ottawa’s corridors of power. He is, says an army colleague, “determined, ambitious and quite intelligent. He gets things done.”