People

People

Jane O’Hara October 23 1978
People

People

Jane O’Hara October 23 1978

People

It will be galling for some who remember wire-whip artist Julia Child as The French Chef— but when she returns to

her televised kitchen after a five-year absence, she’ll be no more Parisian than a Boston baked bean. In departing from her old format, Child will now prepare an entire meal on each show in her 13-part series, “drawing recipes from anywhere and everywhere. That’s really the American way.” Speaking of America, Child is upset over the state of the nation’s stomach, particularly President Carter’s

disinterest in the finer points of dining and drinking. “If someone asked me to one of those receptions and I knew they weren’t serving drinks,” said Child, “I’d say, ‘No thank you.’ ”

hey may not have kissed, but it looks as though producer Ray Stark and America’s monument to machismo Robert Redford have made up. The tiff started when Redford sued Stark for several million dollars after the movie mogul reneged on an alleged promise to give Redford a Ferrari and a percentage of the box-office from The Way We Were. Recently, the suit was settled for $375,000 and another movie, The Electric Horseman—in which Redford will star with Jane Fonda. Although Redford will be paid $3 million for Horseman (plus 12 xk per cent of the top gross) he still hasn’t seen the Ferrari. It’s probably just as well. “The only reason I wanted the car,’’said the 41-year-old Redford, “was so I could drive it through Stark’s garage door.”

n the field, Washington Redskins’ undefeated quarterback Joe Theismann wears the No. 7. Off the field, he

eats it. The “No. 7” is a sandwich, a specialty of the house at Joe Theismann’s restaurant, where, naturally enough, the majority owner Theismann eats his post-game meals. When the former Toronto Argonaut (1971-73) took the restaurant over three years ago, he was warming the Washington bench and the eatery was in the red. Now that he’s rated the top pivot in the NFL, business is booming and plans are under way to practically double the seating capacity. Joe gleefully refers to the res-

taurant as “a historic landmark in Northern Virginia since 1975.”

Ïhe inspiration for Don Harron’s fourth and latest book, Olde Charlie Farquharson ’s Testament, didn’t come to him in a blinding flash of strobe lights—but appropriately enough, it happened last year while he was on location (doing TV’s

Hee Haw) in the Bible Belt. Harron, the 54-year-old author-actor, was glancing through the Gideon Bible in a motel room in Nashville when struck by the idea that he should rework the world’s best-selling biblical tales. Although the original authors didn’t have to contend with editors, Harron’s latter-day revisionists at Gage Publishing Limited saw fit to red-pencil his story, Balaam’s Ass. “It made me mad,” complained Harron from Nashville, where he’s presently working on the 10th anniversary Hee Haw special.

On Winnipeg, hockey star Bobby Hull turned on the golden jets and left no burger unturned. In Fredericton, New Brunswick Premier Richard Hatfield did a little fast-food politicking and in Ottawa, former finance minister Donald Macdonald did his imitation of a Big Mac. All in a good cause. It was McHappy Day (a fund-raising day in which McDonald’s restaurants in Canada raised $689,453.37 for Crippled Children). Although hundreds of sports, entertainment ^nd political personalities took part in the festivities, there was one spoilsport. Mike Palmateer, Toronto Maple Leafs’ goaltender, wouldn’t eat his hamburger. Why? “I don’t like onions.”

Ot happens to the best of them. First there was Ma Walton. Then came Sophia Loren, who played -a put-upon Italian madonna in A Special Day. Now, the comely 36-year-old Raquel Welch is planning to tie the apron strings round herself in an upcoming, as yet untitled United Artists movie, in which she’ll play the mother of a 16-year-old daughter. Although the real-life parent of two children, Damon and Tahnee, the twice-divorced Welch doesn’t have much time for housework these days. Having just closed

her nightclub act in Lake Tahoe, Welch is presently preparing to sing, dance and act as co-host, along with Douglas Fairbanks Jr., of the Nov. 11 TV special called Hollywood's Diamond Jubilee.

ryy7 hen a whiskered Donald Pleasence VAJ showed up in Montreal last week to shoot his part in the movie Labyrinth, he was told by director Claude Pinoteau that the unsightly stubble had to go. According to Pinoteau, Pleasence didn’t look bearded, he simply looked scruffy and not very photogenic. Pleasence apologized, but explained that he needed the beard for his upcoming role in the movie Dracida (starring Frank Langella, directed by Saturday Night Fever's John Badham) which starts filming next week in Britain. “Badham told me he wanted a beard when I play a doctor in charge of a lunatic asylum,” said Pleasence. “I would have grown it sooner, but before Montreal I was in London doing a beer commercial and they wanted me to look my old boring self.”

ry"V7 hen Anne Murray’s husband Bill YA_/ Langstroth says “Smile,” Anne replies, “How wide?” The reason being that Langstroth, a television producer-cum banjo player and singer (Singalong Jubilee, The Tommy Hunter Show), has become Murray’s up-close and personal photographer. (For verification see the credit accompanying the songstress’ soft-focus picture.) Having the knack of being “in the right place at the right time,” Langstroth shot Anne’s last album cover and took the photo for her 15th album, A New Kind of Feeling, to be released in January. Although this is one abrogation of their agreement not to mix their personal and professional lives, musically Anne’s doing well enough on her own. Her latest single, You Needed Me—not dedicated to her husband—is on its way to outselling Snowbird. —

Jane O’Hara