Letters

Letters

October 9 1978
Letters

Letters

October 9 1978

Letters

Crying on the inside

After reading Barbara Amiel’s article, But How Will They Teach Little Girls . . . (Sept. 18), I can assure her that the issue of sex-role stereotyping is no laughing matter to adolescents. As a psychologist I have conducted a number of studies of personality development as well as having counselled a number of individuals. I have always considered it a tragedy to see intelligent, ambitious young females overwhelmed by the anxiety associated with society’s expectations for “good young ladies.” Speaking for myself only, I would like to praise the ministry for its new guidelines and its innovations in curriculum development.

DENNIS RAPHAEL, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY, UNIVERSITY OF WESTERN ONTARIO, LONDON

A plea of Not Guilty

I feel Heather Menzies’ Referendum Debate column, If We're to Discover Our Own Truth . . . (Sept. 4), is piffle. We are sick and tired of being accused of sins we have not committed and of attitudes of mind we don’t possess. We have been told by the French that we have no future, no identity and no goals. They, of course, possess these wonderful attributes. Menzies says that some confess: “I guess I always saw (the French) as a conquered people .. .” What anglophone would ever dream of saying or thinking anything so stupid as that? Furthermore, you can’t really think that we swallow the tale of the two founding nations. The Indians and Eskimos were here long before the white settlers, and these so-called primitive peoples taught their lifestyles to these settlers who could never have withstood the harsh climate without such guidance. Everybody founded this country.

PHYLLIS EVANS, SUDBURY, ONT.

Not-so-secret admirer

I wish Judith Timson had made it clear when she quoted me on the subject of Patsy Gallant in her article, Thursday Night Fever (Sept. 18), that I was among “others on the musical scene” who indeed praised both her dedication and competence. By only quoting my opinion that she appears as a mindless twit without making my views on her

talent, skill and sheer hard work plain to your readers, you have no doubt upset Patsy, of whom I am very fond.

RICHARD FLOHIL, EDITOR THE CANADIAN COMPOSER, TORONTO

The non-participant

In Walter Stewart’s article on Charles Levinson, The Big Fix (Aug. 21), Levinson claims that General Motors actively assisted the German war effort by building Junkers for the Nazis. Nothing could be further from the truth, and Levinson slanders former employees of our company, who are, for the most part, no longer here to defend themselves. In the years prior to 1939, Adam Opel (a GM subsidiary since 1929) had produced only its traditional products— cars, trucks, and spare parts. After the German invasion of Poland in 1939, the American personnel resigned from management positions rather than participate in the production of war materials being used against future allies. With these resignations, though it temporarily retained nominal representation on the board, GM relinquished effective control over the day-to-day operations of Opel. The last of GM’s American employees who had been assigned to Opel departed from Germany in early March, 1941. Following the German declaration of war on the United States on Dec. 11,1941, the relationship with Opel was entirely severed. No Americans sat on the board of directors, even nominally, after that time. Opel, while under GM control, possessed no special aircraft product technology. Levinson also claims that GM “is working on a deal to build heavy trucks in Russia.” We have no such plans in existence—now or in the future. So the answer to Stewart’s question about what we are “up to” in the Soviet Union is “nothing.”

N. M. HALL, MANAGER, NEWS RELATIONS,

PUBLIC RELATIONS DEPT., GENERAL MOTORS OF CANADA LTD., OSHAWA, ONT.

Function over form

After reading your article, Glad You Aren't There (Sept. 18), I have a late suggestion as to what the citizens of Winnipeg should have done with the huge, yellow creation that distracted them from sitting around and watching the cars rust: make it into a plow, and sell it to the highest bidder. For a city that really seems to resist change, Winnipeg still shows itself to the rest of the country as nothing more than an overgrown farm town.

J. C. WHITTAKER, VANCOUVER

One right makes a wrong

In your story on Queen Elizabeth’s visit to Canada, Kind Hearts and Coronets (Aug. 7), you published a photograph of the Queen which obviously was printed

in reverse. The Queen, above all others, knows full well that the Order of Canada as well as other decorations are always worn on the left side. Your picture leads your readers to believe that Her Majesty was improperly dressed when she attended a state dinner in St. John’s. I can assure you from my own personal observations that this was not the case.

DONALD C. BARTER, MAJOR, PRIVATE SECRETARY TO THE

LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR OF NEWFOUNDLAND, ST. JOHN’S

Little cause to cheer

Judith Timson’s article examining the current state of cheerleading in the CFL, Bounce for Glory (Aug. 21), makes me feel terribly relieved that I completed five happy years of cheering for the Saskatchewan Roughriders before such wonderfully progressive social thinkers as Don Courtney and Dick Shatto began their destructive intervention into the activities on the sidelines. Earlier, cheering was something one could feel good about; it was simply energetic, lighthearted and irreverent fun. Sadly, it now appears to be no more than contrived, degrading exploitation of young women who are led to believe that they should enjoy being the objects of suggestive smirking in the name of entertainment. Talent or intelligence be damned. These are, after all, only women, and “what the hell else are women for?” Have we ever come a long way, baby—downhill all the way!

HEATHER McLEOD, TORONTO

Ah shucks...

Not to go overboard about it, the first weekly edition of Maclean’s is simply magnificent. An unqualified triumph! Absolutely first-rate all the waywriting, coverage, layout, illustrations, even the advertising. You must feel an extraordinary sense of accomplishment, sufficient I hope to surmount your undoubted exhaustion. In a country very badly in need of a touch of class, Canada’s weekly newsmagazine provides the full services of an inspired masseur (or masseuse).

JOHN CRAIG, DON MILLS, ONT.

The new Maclean’s has impressed me in several ways: larger print, shorter articles, and a greater variety to choose from. Now I must finish reading the first issue before the next one arrives.

PETER KULYK, WINNIPEG

Blurred revision

Barbara Amiel slips in a piece of unhistorical balderdash while putting down Theodore H. White’s In Search of His-

tory in her book review, The Errors of His Ways (Sept. 4). She states: “. . . it was Roosevelt who, after spilling much American blood (rightly) to get rid of the Nazis, handed over half the world to their Communist equivalent.” Let’s assume she means the installation of Communist governments in China and in Eastern Europe. When all the king’s horses and all the king’s men could never put Chiang Kai-shek together again, does she think that F.D.R. could reverse the results of two decades of civil war and snatch victory away from the Chinese Red Army? Do the monumental struggles of these Orientals count for nothing if they displease white Western leaders? After four years of pro-Soviet propaganda, I do not think that Roosevelt could have mustered support for an armed confrontation with the Soviet Union in 1945 to protect Eastern Europe.

RICHARD VON FUCHS, COURTENAY, B.C.

Clothes encounters

Never before have I seen such a low quality and unappealing fashion display of women’s attire as was portrayed

in your article, Canada in its Fashion (Sept. 4). If this offering is to represent Canada’s contribution to the world of fashion, esthetic pollution appears to be

firmly entrenched in the country’s garment industry. Since when has it become appealing to the general public to see women dressed in modified men’s bowlers, neckties, trousers, bow ties, vests, and sport jackets? If men were to follow the same extreme, their sexual identity would be in immediate question. Those red-eyed, asexual zombies purporting to be models in their illfitting clothes have no place in a national publication that is a reflection of our country’s character.

D. J. LAPIERRE, GRANDE CACHE, ALTA.