Frontlines

Picnic chic up on a peak

Eve Rockett November 27 1978
Frontlines

Picnic chic up on a peak

Eve Rockett November 27 1978

Picnic chic up on a peak

Frontlines

It’s not just another pretty picnic. The young couple have touched nothing stronger than a few sips of red wine, yet they’re on an obvious high. If they feel above the world, looking down, they have every right to—they are high on a mountaintop, totally alone. They

haven’t climbed there; the step-by-step process would dilute the extraordinary kick. Instead, they were dropped off by helicopter, left for a few hours with a basket of wine and pâté to enter rarefied emotional territory.

“We were gods to each other,” says Vancouver cameraman Tim Sale of his mountaintop picnic with friend Sandra Gould. “We wept. We expected to be awed but we didn’t expect it to reach right down inside.”

In British Columbia, this euphoria can be yours for as little as $50 per person for a party of four. Pilot Jim Logue of Okanagan Helicopters has been ferrying picnickers to remote glacier sites for four years and he still gets carried away by the mountaintop experience, sometimes parking his machine for his own private picnic.

Even now, as autumn’s weather closes in on Canada, Sale and Gould found it warm and pleasant high on Powder Mountain, 50 miles north of Vancouver. It was a new universe in which ravens soared like eagles and tiny spiders drifted by on bits of web. “You could spend 10 minutes watching and listening to a bird soar about effortlessly,” says Sale. “Even when he was way off you could still hear it.”

Eve Rockett