Letters

Letters

November 6 1978
Letters

Letters

November 6 1978

Letters

A price for pricelessness

We would like to thank Maclean's for the article on our campaign to raise $100,000 to restore the Emily Carr collection, Carr's Art: Poverty's Scars Are Showing (Oct. 2). While the insured value of the collection is a nominal thing, her works are irreplaceable and

therefore priceless. It is in fact insured for $3.5 million and not $53 million as published in your story.

DOROTHY METCALFE, INFORMATION OFFICER, VANCOUVER ART GALLERY, VANCOUVER

A Pinocchian problem

Colonel Samuel Colt’s Brobdingnagian Buntline Special revolver (longest known barrel: 16 inches) pales to a derringer in the face of your remarkable assertion in Oh Canada, Stick ’em Up (Preview, Oct. 16) that weapons restricted in Canada “are handguns and semi-automatic rifles with barrels of less than 184 inches.” Please chop it back to the correct length of 18 Vi» inches.

MORGAN EVANS, TORONTO

Stoop labor of love

In your item on Liza Minnelli (People, Oct. 2) you state that she made “her way to that $195-a-day suite accompanied

only by a lowly bellhop.” This is a bigoted remark, to say the least. Just because the fellow is a bellhop, and working for a living, hardly makes him lowly. I am not a bellhop, but I certainly disagree with that type of remark.

JOHN G. KIRKMAN, EDMONTON

Through a glass selectively

In Peter Newman’s editorial Our Cops Should Stop Moving . . . (Oct. 2), he concludes that the police should enforce and obey the laws, not try to make them. Earlier on, however, he complains because the police are diligently enforcing and obeying the law against using cannabis. Since, in his view, this law no longer reflects prevailing customs or moral values, he implies the police should look the other way when they see it broken. But then he goes on to castigate the police for trying to revive capital punishment, even though one of your writers reports that 68 per cent of all Canadians favor its revival in Law and Order on the March (Oct. 2). I can only conclude from this logical nightmare that Newman wants the police to ignore the laws he dislikes, and enforce and obey the ones he favors.

JOE CAMPBELL, SASKATOON, SASK.

I disagree entirely with Peter Newman’s suggestion that the police stick to mere enforcement of the law and stay away from the political process. I fail to see any problem with our police forces vigorously making representations as to their views on what the law should be. Such is the right and duty of every citizen, and is certainly a

duty in the case of the police. After all, they have the most intimate knowledge of the problems of maintaining a safe and secure society, by reason of their day-to-day contact with those whose behavior ranges from the inconsiderate to the violently hostile.

RONALD ANGUS MACDONALD, BA, LLB ANTIGONISH, N.S.

I think Peter Newman should think again if he ever writes another article on our cops. Their job is a tough one, and is getting tougher all the time. There is nothing wrong with asking for more protection for their lives, namely the restoration of capital punishment.

MAX RANDELL, BIDE ARM, NFLD.

Remembering the main

We object to Maclean’s referring to the two dozen very capable boat-builders and designers in Nova Scotia as “mere builders,” in Yes, They Do Make Them ... (Sept. 25), Furthermore, your reference to $l-million boats is grossly exaggerated.

FLORENCE STEVENS, MURRAY D. STEVENS LTD., LUNENBURG, N.S.

Blue from sea to sea?

I was glad to read your article, Law and Order on the March (Oct. 2). During the past five years, I have viewed with alarm the increasing power of the police lobby. It seems obvious that the greater this power becomes, the closer we come to creating a police state.

T. M. LOTHIAN, CALGARY

Laughing in the dark

You have once again managed to breathe life into something I thought had died, the “Newfy joke,” in your article, But Will This Stop All Those Mainland Jokes? (Sept. 18). The article on nationalism in Newfoundland was well written, but you could not resist the jibe in the title and the cartoon. My first reaction was one of anger. I have spent several years in Canada and I was forced to submit to recycled Polish jokes. Eventually I came to recognize the true reason for those attacks of Canadians against Newfoundlanders. It is all rooted in the basic insecurity, the lack of maturity, and general deepseated envy of the rest of Canada for

Newfoundlanders. You have long been confounded by the fact that we know Who we are, and you still grope in the darkness. In Newfoundland, we say we are Newfoundlanders. That one magic word contains a whole world of feelings, memories, and history.

JAMES C. BUTLER, STEPHENVILLE CROSSING, NFLD.

Women’s Lip sealed

After reading the column about current sexual attitudes, The Temptation is Great, Sometimes, to Line Up with the “Sexual Oppressors” (Sept. 4), I hope that you will give a feminist a full page to respond to Mordecai Richler/Clint Eastwood. I restrain myself from epithets. Often, your mag is terrific, but... again, I restrain myself.

LOUISE THOMPSON, NEW YORK, N.Y.

Citizenette Hearst

I was pleased to see your item on Patricia Hearst(People, Sept. 25). Many Canadians, from all parts of the country, are supporting the Committee for the Release of Patricia Hearst out of a

deep personal concern and sympathy for Hearst, as well as out of an overriding belief in equality of justice for all. MELISSA RAVEN, CANADIAN CHAIRMAN, COMMITTEE FOR THE RELEASE OF PATRICIA HEARST, OTTAWA

The found chord

Barbara Amiel’s column, How to Live with Cuts in the Arts . . . (Oct. 16), certainly strikes a true chord with me.

As Canada and the world face economic realities, people are forced to take a hard, pragmatic view of life. Unfortunately, to many, this means ignoring interesting diversions, such as the arts. As an artist, I feel that it is important to reach as wide an audience as possible, and keep my dignity intact, without becoming a hack. I have the utmost confidence that people, when exposed to good art, will respond.

RON HOBBS, ISLINGTON, ONT.

Royal pain in the mouth

Please ask Mordecai Richler where he gets the statistic that the local dentist receives $50,000 a year, quoted in his column So You Would Become a Mario Puzo, eh? . . . (Oct. 2). I am loathe to move to Ontario, or other parts of Eastern Canada, but I could be induced to do so for such an income—or is Richler quoting the Canadian average? Regardless, his statement is incorrect, irresponsible, and offensive, depending on which fool takes him seriously.

DR. M. B. LEVITT, EDMONTON

Oinking your way to health

After reading your article, Diet While Nibbling: Just Omit the Meals (Oct. 2), I wonder after which wild animals we are to pattern our eating habits, to nibble our way to health. The lion, who gorges himself on zebra or impala, then goes to sleep for up to a week? The boa constrictor swallowing a whole pig and digesting it at sleepy leisure? Grazing animals who must ingest grass all day long to get enough nourishment for their size? Or those of the bovine persuasion who fill the first of their four stomachs

with grass, then calmly regurgitate it and eat it all over again? Or perhaps we

should emulate the shark, who gets into such a frenzy when feeding that it would even eat itself, if it could

somehow get in its own way. Humans have been eating three meals a day (when they could get them) for centuries, so presumably it is nature’s way with us. People who eat unwisely and too much at their three-a-day will snack unwisely and too much. Most obese people snack and eat their regular meals. A little self-discipline is, as usual, the best way. Or, as the song says, would you rather be a pig?

ROBERT HOGAN, TORONTO

Too few jolly jumpers

I feel Patsy Gallant is criticized for her vibrant performance in your article, Thursday Night Fever (Sept. 18). With American programs dominating Canadian networks, it appears that the only way for Canadians to get any recognition is to make themselves heard; and that is exactly what Gallant is doing. When I listen to René Simard and other overrated Canadian performers, I’m surprised the television viewing audience isn’t jumping for joy that this vital performer is trying to break away from the talent-suppressing bonds of the television industry.

TIM POST, BARRY’S BAY, ONT.