Letters

Letters

December 18 1978
Letters

Letters

December 18 1978

Letters

The Great White Gobbler

Congratulations for printing the article by Suzanne Zwarun describing Murvin Sawyer’s problems with the department of Indian affairs, Aground on an Ottawa Reef (Nov. 6). However, the $140,000 spent by Sawyer on this illfated business venture with Indian Affairs represents a very tiny amount in comparison to the amount of money wasted by the department every year. Indian Affairs’ present budget is in excess of $500 million. Less than 15 per cent of the total budget ever reaches the Indians. If Sawyer succeeds in collecting the $380,500 in damages the amount will probably come from the 15 per cent which would normally go to the Indian people. The ultimate tragedy, however, is the death by suicide of the two Indian people that Sawyer employed. Mr. Sawyer’s life savings have been wasted. Our taxpayers’ dollars have been Wasted. One can only imagine how much money has been gobbled up through the incompetence of the department of Indian affairs.

BILL WILSON, PRESIDENT, UNITED NATIVE NATIONS, VANCOUVER

May the force be with us

I feel your article, The Armed Forces: In From the Cold (Nov. 6), is one of the most unpatriotic, degrading pieces ever to come out of a supposedly Canadian newsmagazine. In the event of a crisis, I honestly hope that your writer, Roy MacGregor, is left to defend Canada, since he feels that the Forces are just a bunch of trigger-happy savages. My father is a member of the RCHA. He, and others like him, receive no overtime, be-

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long to no union, but they do their jobs by keeping Canada safe and ready in case of a crisis.

STEPHEN THOMPSON, OTTAWA

Gnaws II in P.E.I.?

I read with interest your article on the beaver, Gnaws—a Canadian Sequel to “Jaws”(Oct. 23). However, you have incorrectly placed Prince Albert in British Columbia instead of in Saskatchewan, where it belongs.

H. B. STROM, PRINCE ALBERT, SASK.

The Pepsi Degeneration

In your article on the Shah of Iran, A Despot ’s Last-Ditch Stand (Nov. 20), you state that “Iran’s Pepsi-Cola king—

once a poor Iranian businessman in Rome ... has built himself a $15-billion mansion.” Even if the correct figure were $15 million, Canada’s governmental excesses could not match this magnificent rate of spending.

R. A. MACDONALD COLLIE, CALGARY

To praise in fear

After reading your article on Man Alive, Faith, Hope and CBC (Nov. 13), I was frightened. As history shows, every time CBC has a program that achieves good ratings, or any type of praise, it seems to cancel the show. Therefore, I’ll be careful, as this could go on for paragraphs, and say only that Man Alive with host Roy Bonisteel is one of the best damn shows on CBC.

C. E. FRASER, WATERVILLE, N.S.

Kill a penalty for Christ

I was very disappointed by your article on Christian hockey players, The Christians in the Arenas (Nov. 13). I believe that the writers have painted a very negative picture of a belief that has positively helped these players, both in their careers and in their lives. I question the conclusions reached by the writers for several reasons: a) They conducted extensive interviews with the players and selected only a few isolated quotes to bolster their own theories; b) They confuse Christian beliefs and Jehovah’s Witness beliefs by throwing Tom Edur into the same arena; c) They quote only Steve Durbano and Harold Ballard as outside sources. I am concerned as to the potential negative effect that such an article might have on the lives of many young athletes in attendance at our camps.

DON LIESEMER, CHRISTIAN ATHLETE HOCKEY CAMPS INC., BEACONSFIELD, QUE.

Fun without foreplay

It was a displeasure to read in Picnic Chic up on a Peak (Nov. 27) about yet another remarkable achievement of mankind over nature—mountainclimbing without having to take a step. Imagine a world where striving to attain actually dilutes the pleasure, where the ultimate in achievement in consummation without foreplay or effort. Carried to the extreme, we can look forward to films of joggers on TV—saves the sweat—or perhaps even a walk around the block from the comfort of an armchair.

P. G. YOUNG, KINGSTON, ONT.

To be seen and heard

As Warren Gerard noted in Kids Without Rights (Nov. 20), Canada’s health-care planning is not yet sufficiently preventive in orientation to be directed specifically toward the young. In the mental health field, professionals concerned about the lack of focus on the child have rallied around the seven recommendations of the 1977 Task Force on New Directions in Children’s Mental Health to spark debate and reform in this area. The task force recommendations are available to the public through our association under the title, Tomorrow ’s Children.

JOHN A. GOYEAU, COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR, CANADIAN MENTAL HEALTH ASSOCIATION, TORONTO

Bravo for your article on children’s rights. I fully agree that we must stop seeing children as “dependent, incompetent possessions, to be seen and not heard.”

LOUIS M. MANNING, TORONTO

I would like to propose that giving children more freedom and rights than they are capable of handling with mature understanding is perhaps compounding a serious problem and, in a sense, shifting the responsibility from ourselves as parents to a group that does not want it. Forcing a child to make decisions that are going to affect the rest of his life is like asking someone to choose his future

from behind closed doors: children are not yet capable of knowing what adult life is all about, and they should not be expected to.

BILL MACLEAN, TORONTO

Readability zero

If a student presented me with a paper as incredibly overwritten and opaque as the column by William Casselman, Deliver Us .. . (Nov. 6), he would get the failure he so richly deserved.

TERRY GOLDIE, DEPT. OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE, MEMORIAL UNIVERSITY OF NEWFOUNDLAND, ST. JOHN’S

All in another family

I agree entirely with Mordecai Richler’s review of Owl magazine in his column, Big Blue Whales . . . (Nov. 27). As a teacher and parent, I have had an opportunity to read many issues and find it a very satisfying publication. I was appalled, however, to read the scathing attack on the Clark family which Richler chose to include in his essay. It is an example of a clever use of language

combined with a meanness of spirit, which I find incredible.

MRS. LYNDELL HUGHES, OTTAWA

What news is good news?

I wish to express my objection to your cover picture for the story on the new “screen gems” (Nov. 13). I thought you were a newsmagazine, not competition for Cosmopolitan.

G. V. SANDERS, OTTAWA

The first shalll be first

Maclean's, which boasts of itself as “Canada’s weekly newsmagazine,” calls Pierre Trudeau’s family the “first family,” in Sure It's Fiction . . . (Nov. 6). When will Canadians learn that they live in a political culture that is different from that of the United States? Since Queen Elizabeth is Canada’s sovereign, it might seem that her family could be termed our first. However, since she habitually resides outside the country, a strong case can be made for the Governor-General’s family. But whether the Queen’s or the GovernorGeneral’s family is the first, in no way is the prime minister’s.

JACQUES MONET, FACULTY OF ARTS, UNIVERSITY OF OTTAWA, OTTAWA

The Sundance bid

Thank you and Peter Carlyle-Gordge for the article on Sundance, Manitoba, No One Lives Here Anymore (Nov. 6). As a past resident of Sundance, I find it satisfying, if not comforting, to know that the passing of our town has been noticed by someone other than the residents and families its demise has so drastically affected. It is with mixed emotions, in this case, that we see people responding to the media’s call for energy conservation.

M. BOND, RICHER, MAN.