Letters

May 29 1978

Letters

May 29 1978

Letters

Not the singer, but the song

I disagree with Tom Hopkins attitude toward Gordon Lightfoot in his article, Gordon’s Song (May 1). Instead of raking Lightfoot over the coals, he should have praised what the music is saying.

JO-ANNE CARLGREN, TORONTO

The Pill and all its works

Your article on the perils of the pill, A Blessing and a Curse (April 17), was electrifying.

SUE WHOMES, PRINCE GEORGE, B.C.

Now that you have featured the perils of the pill, 1 suggest you follow this article by ones on the perils of pregnancy, the perils of over-copulation and the perils of overpopulation.

MARIAN B. HALL, MD, RICHMOND, B.C.

Pity the woman for whom “the pill is still the best answer there is.” It isn’t. Natural family planning—not to be confused with the obsolete calendar rhythm method—is the best answer. It requires of a woman only self-knowledge, self-respect and selfcontrol, qualities which are sadly lacking in our pathetic, liberated woman of the ’70s.

BERNADETTE ROMANOWSKY, RIVER JOHN, N.S.

The last angry man

I object to the hatchet job Robert Lewis attempts to do on Elmer MacKay in the article, Nobody Listens Any More (April 17). A quick survey of MacKay’s record in Ottawa speaks for itself. He is responsible for bringing to light scandalous situations relating to the Laurentian Pilotage Authority (1974), Skyshops and Senator Louis Giguère (1975), Air Canada (1976), Statistics

Canada (1976), Hamilton Harbor (197475), siu (1974-75), Loto Canada (1976), Anti-Dumping matters (1977), the Warren Hart affair (1978), and the precarious role of the RCMP and its numerous political masters (Goyer, Allmand, Fox, Blais). In each of the mentioned situations MacKay’s credibility and honesty were completely unimpeachable. His frank and open posture with the Canadian people and the House of Commons is certainly worthy of higher praise than the secret and unresponsive conduct of the majority of Trudeau’s changing cabinet. When we read daily reports of unlawful RCMP activities, I would suggest that MacKay’s revelations and probing questions on the force have been totally vindicated. Possibly a few more Elmer MacKays would ensure a healthier, more honest and responsive political scene in Ottawa.

F. R. VON VEH. TORONTO

We were, like, just doing our thing...

I greatly enjoyed your article on current language usage, How to Talk Stupid and Influence People (April 17). It was well written and I have reread it more than once. 1 find it refreshing to see at least one publication actually analysing something which affects us all in one form or another—our use of language as it relates to both form and content.

ROBERT JOHN LEISHMAN, TORONTO

The right to try is not the right to do

The caption to your story, The Arm to Bear Rights (May 1), about the Canadian Human Rights Commission, states that Gordon Fairweather is trying to help some women fight deportation to Jamaica. This is not correct. Fairweather is trying to establish the commission’s right to receive and investigate the women’s complaint of discrimination. The minister of employment and immigration has denied that the commission has this right. Until investigation is allowed, the commission cannot, and has not, decided that the deportations are discriminatory.

RUSSELL JURIANSZ, LEGAL COUNSEL, CANADIAN HUMAN RIGHTS COMMISSION,

OTTAWA

The noncombatants

Outraged is the only word to describe my feelings after reading your article on dogfighting, Dying Like a Dog ( May 1 ). I have raised, trained and sold pit bull terriers for a number of years for pet and show. I am against fighting them. As a result of your article, which unfairly labels me as a dogfighter, I have been receiving threatening phone calls, which have placed my business and my life in jeopardy.

STEPHANIE BRISCOE. VANCOUVER

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Ah, those weren’t the days

Barbara Amiel’s profile of Margaret Trudeau, Swinging on a Star (April 3)—although excellent in its analysis of Margaret—goes the way of many articles written in the 1970s, by becoming involved in ’60sbaiting. Amiel uses the overly simplistic statement, “the change-for-change’s-sake spirit of the Sixties,” to describe that period of time. Many of the movements during that decade had definite aims and

goals—such as the civil rights movement under Martin Luther King, and the antiVietnam war movement. I feel the term, “Sixties flower child,” which Amiel applies to Margaret, was simply a creation of the mass media, which were trying to make something out of Margaret which she wasn’t.

IAN R. SUTHERLAND. SARNIA, ONT.

How dare Barbara Amiel use the word “courage” in describing Margaret Trudeau. It takes courage to stay married in today’s world. Margaret is a coward.

MRS. DAVID L. JOHNSON, FORT LAUDERDALE, FLA.

I was thoroughly incensed at Barbara Amiel’s cursory treatment of the women’s movement in her article on Margaret Trudeau. She dismisses the movement as unwarranted, complaining about “the pampered North American female.” Those of us who are part of the feminist . movement simply ask for the same rights and privileges as those enjoyed by men, and we are perfectly willing to forgo this illusive “pampering” to attain our rightful place in society.

DEBRA MCALLISTER, DOWNSVIEW, ONT.

A sense of balance

I wish to express my pleasure with the objective and thorough report onjuvenile delinquency in Canada in your article, Un-

fortunately There Is Such a Thing as a Bad Boy (April 3). Much of the reporting on delinquency in this country is done with great emotionalism. Opinions range from locking the children up and throwing away the keys to maintaining that all the children require is a hug and a kiss. It is refreshing to read an article which presents the problems and the difficulties involved in a realistic manner. Hopefully it will lead to a clearer understanding of some of the issues being faced in dealing with juvenile delinquency.

W. D. GREATOREX, DIRECTOR, SPECIAL PROTECTION SERVICES, HALIFAX

Running away from home, promiscuity, and truancy can be compared to sneezing, coughing and internal bleeding. They are signs of pain and symptoms of poor health. Bring on the hockey and dancing lessons and clean up the regulations regarding who will care for juvenile delinquents. Spare the rod and spare the child.

MAUREEN TOMS, CO-DIRECTOR. TOAD HALL FOR BOYS, BRIGHT, ONT.

The Quiet Revolution?

Morrie Ruvinsky’s claim in the article, The Palls of Academe (April 3), that Canadian campuses reflect “the Fifties all over again” is ludicrous. Apparently students

have to stage violent confrontations, not orderly sit-ins, to be deemed activists.

MURRAY MACADAM. TORONTO

Too little, too seldom

As I sit on an Air Canada flight, I am annoyed at reading the comments of D. E. McLeod, vice-president of public affairs for Air Canada (Letters, April 17). He speaks of the cheap Nighthawk service across Canada which has been advertised for several months. My inquiries prove this service does not start until June 16 and ends in September. So much advertising for so short a service seems to me to be

more of an irritant than is the cheap fare a benefit.

ONIDA TOUCHE, CALGARY

Carved in stone

I hope this numbers among a torrent of letters expressing disgust with Allan Fotheringham’s arrogant tirade against the game of curling in If These People Must Get Their Rocks Off. .. (April 3)

DON TOMKINS, REGINA

I would like to express my heartfelt thanks that someone else sees curling as something other than the birthright of every Ca-

nadian. As president of a college fraternity I have had the opportunity to observe many of my fraters, clad in tight T-shirts and pastel slacks, slide about on a sheet of ice and do something called curling. Fotheringham’s column most certainly hit the nail on the head.

D. G. TEEL, JR., WINNIPEG

The ear of the beholder

Thank you for your interview with the prime minister (April 3). You state that “his answers were uncertain and his grasp of detail far from complete on the subject of the economy.” On the contrary, I feel it was the understanding of his answers that was far from complete.

E. R. CLARK, BRAMPTON, ONT.

The Beauty that is Rome

In your interview with Mel Brooks (April 17), Philip Fleishman states that we do not have Rome Beauties in Canada. This is not

true. The Rome Beauty is indeed a Canadian apple, or, at least, a Nova Scotia one. CHARLES E. HALIBURTON, DIGBY, N.S.

Fighting the Red Menace

I feel your illustration of the neutron bomb exploding over Toronto in How Jimmy Carter Learned Not to Love the Bomb (April 17) is one of the more bizarre techniques used by the press which clouds cold reason with emotion and fear on the nuclear weapons issue. The neutron bomb is a tactical battlefield weapon which could deter, or spell survival for Western Europe against a Soviet invasion.

DON WAFFLE, WINDSOR, ONT.