Letters

Send in the clown

August 7 1978
Letters

Send in the clown

August 7 1978

Send in the clown

Letters

I have long admired the talents of Valri Bromfield, profiled in The Reluctant Star (June 12). Unfortunately I feel she has never received the acclaim her captivating

humor so richly deserves. That is, until your excellent article. Now others can join me in watching her rise to the top.

P. KOUNER, TORONTO

Going it alone

The people referred to in Alone in the Crowd (June 12) all seemed to wish they were part of a relationship of some sort. No wonder they were unhappy. The ones who are truly “successfully single” are the people who, like me, have no desire to have children and no intention of becoming

shackled emotionally or sexually to anyone.

T. A. TRUEMAN, VANCOUVER

I feel that most articles written on the manners and mores of the human race completely ignore the middle-aged woman. But ironically, in your article on singleness she inadvertently plays a major role. There is a large number of young women today who have seen their fathers taking off with the young girl from the office, leaving behind a middle-aged wife, completely without skills other than running a home and raising a family. For many years this woman has worked an 18-hour day, seven days a week, only to find herself completely alone at 55. Their daughters are asking themselves if this is what they want and the answer is a resounding “No!” The time has finally arrived when the man has got to think of marriage as a 24-hour-a-day commitment on equal terms.

JANE HAMILTON, HAMILTON, ONT.

I really appreciated the article on the singles myth. I see the myth affecting many second and third generation urban Canadians who are reaping the benefits of their parents and grandparents, and who do not feel the pressure to devote themselves to marriage. The security once promised by marriage is scoffed at as being unnecessary by young adults today.

A. MILLER, TORONTO

A world of difference

Your story on the invasion of Zaire, An African Incursion (May 29), is an example of the kind of “crisis journalism” Western writers are often accused of practising in

covering Africa. Little effort was made to inform readers of the reasons why the people of Katanga want to regain control of their territory, or why they are protesting so vigorously against the Mobutu regime. I feel the use of phrases such as “the seething continent” only reinforces the stereotypes many Canadians hold about Africa—especially that it is in constant turmoil. The fact that the Ivory Coast is as different from Libya and Botswana as Norway is from Portugal is a point that needs to be more fully understood.

E. M. RILEY, ACCRA, GHANA

But what would we line the birdcage with?

In reply to Barbara Amiel’s column, Laugh and the World Laughs With You . . . (June 26), the following is my contribution to Canadian unity: Canadians should collect all the Maclean’s magazines not being used in the nation’s litter boxes and burn them in one great bonfire. Of course, Amiel’s and Fotheringham’s columns could be thrown on top (for the humor). This would bring Canadians from all parts of the nation together in joyous celebration.

PATRICK A. TUBA, PRINCE GEORGE, B.C.

The boys who cried wolf

I feel that William Lowther’s article, The Gathering Storm (May 29), on the alleged Soviet military buildup is nothing more than unadulterated warmongering On behalf of the Pentagon. I have been listening to the same sort of bilge for as long as I have been able to read or turn a radio dial. Like thousands of other Canadians I have become completely cynical about the socalled “Soviet menace.”

I feel Maclean’s is incredibly immoral. You print a cover story on The Gathering Storm which implies that a nuclear war is on its way. In the article William Lowther writes nothing but a series of statistics about arms buildup and warns that it may be too late. Shall we all huddle in fear at Lowther’s cue?

REV. JAMES A. HILL, DUNCAN, B.C.

Not merely for the fun of it

Had Martin O’Malley raised his eyes from the seats of our “hard-assed” men in his article, Wrists of Iron—and Clay (June 12), he might have noticed that the wristwrestling competition was sponsored by Carling-O’Keefe and the Kiwanis Club of Timmins. This project raises several thou-

sands of dollars for the benefit of crippled children.

D. DAULT, TIMMINS, ONT.

Don’t call us, we’ll call you

I have news for Allan Fotheringham after reading his column on celebrity redistribution, Let Us Not Now Praise Famous Men . . . (June 26): Alberta doesn’t want any MERC leftovers. We will continue to flourish with our prairie mini-celebrities like Peter the petro-pumper and Windy W. O. Mitchell.

GAIL GHAI, CALGARY

Hands across the gulf

May I congratulate David Thomas on his splendid story on the exchange between B.C. and Quebec teen-agers, When Worlds

Collide (June 26). I strongly urge you to turn it into a series. We have to have more of Patrice Dallaire and Norma Nickel, Carol McCauley and Vivian Vander Zalm. These kids say a lot more about the real present and future of Canada than an armchair full of politicians and sociologists.

DAVID DOWLING, PERTH, WESTERN AUSTRALIA

As I was a participant in the Open House Canada exchange, I must compliment David Thomas for capturing the mood of the experience. It was unfortunate that it took the tragedy of an automobile accident to make the group realize the true meaning of the program. I can only hope that the government continues the exchange, for it provides experiences that one can never be taught at home or in school. To have had the opportunity to visit Canadians who are as different as they are alike was the thrill of a lifetime.

DAVE CHARLEBOIS, SURREY, B.C.

Going about the Lord’s work

Thank you for your interview with Billy Graham (June 26). It was a mature and open presentation of the evangelist and his work. Praise be to God for such a person in Christ!

REV. K. BURTON, RIVERSIDE, N.B.