People

People

Jane O’Hara January 15 1979
People

People

Jane O’Hara January 15 1979

People

On the off chance that all work and no play might make a dull boy out of even a flamboyant head of state, Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau spent a few leisurely days in Runaway Bay, Jamaica, last week, following a summit meeting with six other world leaders to discuss economic order. For Trudeau, it was his second “summit meeting” in as many weeks, considering that over Christmas he was reunited with his estranged wife Margaret (author of Beyond Reason) at the West Vancouver home of his in-laws, Mr. and Mrs. James Sinclair. While in Runaway Bay, Trudeau stayed at the vacation villa of a University of Michigan professor, but he spent some time at the Negril Beach Village, a swinging holiday spot which advertises hedonism. In the company of his casually dressed security guards, the PM failed to make use of the resort’s nude beach, but he did go scuba diving by day and tripped fantastically on the Negril dance floor at night.

e has been legitimate. He has done Shaw and Ibsen and always wanted to do Hamlet, but the turning point in actor Dirk Benedict’s career came when he finally said to himself: “The world doesn’t need another great actor. I’ll become a commodity.” And so, after turning to Hollywood where his all-

American looks were greatly appreciated, Benedict landed the lucrative role of Lieutenant Starbuck in ABC-TV’s hit series Battlestar Galáctica. Since that time his beach-boy face and pin-up physique have been enough to launch a thousand teenyboppers and despite his “sellout” to network schlock, Benedict is starting to enjoy the perks of his new celebrity. “I smoked my first cigar when I was 14,” said Benedict, who plans to parlay his fame into feature films and nightclub dates. “Well, now I can afford better cigars. But face it—all that matters is whether the media have a good quote to put on your gravestone.”

/¡¡Ysthe very pampered, very decorous Zru daughter of a British army brigadier-general, 39-year-old actress Samantha Eggar (The Collector, Why Shoot the Teacher) still demands a little civility in life. With that in mind, it comes as no surprise that Eggar refused to stay in the same hotel as her rambunctious co-star Oliver Reed (Women in Love) during her recent four-day sojourn in Toronto while filming David Cronenberg’s The Brood. Reed, who has a reputation for drinking and carousing (after one long, liquid lunch he was picked up by Toronto police for waltzing trouser-

less on Avenue Road), was consequently billeted at the Park Plaza. Eggar was placed a shot-glass’s throw away, across the street at the Four Seasons. Although the twosome didn’t meet off the set, in the film Eggar is called upon to spend a good deal of time with Reed. She is a patient. He is her therapist.

lthough ostensibly in Los Angeles LrA to shoot his part as Sergeant Frank Tree in an upcoming movie, 191+1, Canadian comic Dan Aykroyd (Saturday Night Live) admits he’s really on a secret mission to prevent U.S. imperialism and preserve Canadian unity. Riding tank with Aykroyd on the set of 191+1 (a comedy based on American events after the attack on Pearl Harbor) is his old pal from Toronto’s Second City, John Candy, and his Blues Brother, John Belushi (Animal House). “What I’m really doing down here,” said Aykroyd, 26, “is gathering information to defend Canada, because I’m convinced that in 1995 the States will take us over. First, they’ll send in the National Guard from Maine to capture Quebec and then they’ll grab our asbestos plants. The Americans don’t know it, but I’m a security threat. I know how to unplug NBCeven CBS—and I know how to sneak into the back door of the White House since I’ve been there twice. You can go ahead and print this, just remember—it’s topsecret stuff.”

ith phasers on alert, Captain Kirk on the bridge and Scottie in the control room harping about warp speeds, Paramount Pictures has started filming Star Trek in an effort to boldly go where no TV series has ever gone before. At a cost of $15 million, the

movie remake of the late ’60s television show will reunite the original cast of the Starship Enterprise, hoping to cash in on the Trekkies craze which has

spawned 371 fan clubs, annual conventions, more than 50 books and 431 fan publications. Although the crew will be dressed somewhat differently—they have been given a mod intergalactic uniform with life-support systems worn at

the waist—the faces remain the same. Montreal-born William Shatner (Kirk) will control the ship; Leonard Nimoy, as the pointy-eared Vulcan Spock, will do his best not to emote; DeForest Kelley (Dr. “Bones” McCoy), James Doohan (Scotty), Nichelle Nichols (Uhura) and Walter Koenig (Chekov) will return as members of the ethnically and racially balanced Starship. For Shatner, whose face is more often associated with supermarket commercials, “It’s all becoming very sweet now.”

[I ust before Canada After Dark host Paul Soles went on holiday to England last week, his boss, CBC head of variety programming Jack McAndrew, invited him to the house and poured him a drink. It was rum and water, on the rocks. The news was straight up and as far as Soles was concerned the cocktail patter left a lot to be desired. McAndrew’s tidings were that as of Jan. 26., Canada After Dark and its crew of 35 would cease production. Surprise? Although Soles said he “wasn’t expecting it,” After Dark's ridiculously low ratings and $45,000 weekly budget made the show eminently dispensable in light of the 1979 CBC financial cutbacks. Soles, who took over the show last season (Peter Gzowski had hosted it into the ground since ’76), said he was “disappointed,” but not bitter and certainly available for future assignments from the network. “I like to work,” he said. “My association with the CBC will continue.”

there’s no recluse like an old recluse so, consequently, when 66-year-old heiress Doris Duke wanders from the confines of her barbwire-fenced Rhode Island estate called Rough Point, it’s something of an event. Duke, the American Tobacco Company heiress (Lucky Strike, Tareyton) and daughter of James B. Duke, recently made a rare appearance at Newport’s Queen Anne Square, a public park revitalized by the Newport Restoration Foundation. Since Duke has been a patron of the foundation to the tune of $12 million, Newporters willingly defer to her wish for privacy. This isn’t the case with visiting journalists, so when a photographer from Providence, R.I., showed up and started clicking, the police were called in. After being ordered off the property, the photographer filed a complaint with police chief Frederick W. Newton who, somewhat sheepishly, admitted that the policeman had acted without authority. While the chief was explaining it “wouldn’t happen again,” Duke had fled the scene and, naturally, was “unavailable for comment.”

Jane O’Hara