People

Bash and crash Barbra

Marsha Boulton December 10 1979
People

Bash and crash Barbra

Marsha Boulton December 10 1979

Bash and crash Barbra

People

"Some guys see a rock and roll singer and all they can say is ‘What a great set of knockers,’” sighs Rachel Paiement, the 23-year-old lead vocalist and sole female member of the Sudbury, Ontario, bilingual band CANO. “Sometimes the rest of the band thinks I should push it,” Paiement says of the internal debate over the amount of sex appeal that’s required for success. She and the other six members of the Coopérative Artistique du Nouvel Ontario just finished a Canadian tour to promote their latest album, Rendezvous. Travelling across the country in a Winnebago with the boys in the band and three all-male technicians didn’t faze Paiement. “Pm a business partner,” she says. “I’ve got respect. Without that I’d just be another chick in a band.”

Though his third major album, American Boy & Girl, is getting little airtime on North American radio stations, 34-year-old Garland Jeffreys continues to attract a cult following. Casual references to the likes of Mao Tse-tung, Wilhelm Reich and Roman Polanski threaten to make him the Woody Allen of punk-reggae-rock. Brooklyn-born Jeffreys still holds as his fondest wish to have “lived in Florence during the Renaissance” and be managed by Lorenzo de’ Medici. After a tour of Toronto, Ottawa and Montreal, he prepared to take his eclectic music to Europe, complete with stage moves that make Mick

Jagger look “clean.” Jeffreys sees his brand of music looking “into the ’80s,” while Jagger, he says, “looks clumsy.”

The “deep sniff” case involving the nasal passages of White House Chief of Staff Hamilton Jordan has reached its sternest test. Last week New York attorney Arthur Christy was appointed as special prosecutor to investigate

charges that the president’s right-hand man snorted cocaine at Studio 54. The charges originated with Steve Rubell and Ian Schräger, the trendy co-owners of the trendy disco, who are themselves up on charges of tax evasion. Normally, the allegations would be deemed gossip and ignored by the U.S. courts, but because of the Watergate-inspired Ethics in Government Act all charges that government officials have been breaking the law must be investigated. In the meantime, Jimmy Carter has expressed “complete confidence” in Jordan.

The people who brought you Mickey Mouse had this great idea—a science-fiction epic about black holes in space. Maximilian Schell, Anthony Perkins, Yvette Mimieux and Ernest Borgnine were laid on and more than $20 million was spent for special effects. They called the deep-space movie The Black Hole. Then someone was churlish enough to ask what a black hole was. Nobody could explain it. Enter Dr. William J. Kaufmann III, astrophysicist, author and expert on hole phenomena, hired to travel around North America telling potential filmgoers what a black hole is so that they will have good reason to pay to see the movie. Holes, he explains, are the remains of dead stars that have become compacted into a bundle of mass and energy smaller than a bread box. The scary part is that the force of gravity remains and is powerful enough to poke a hole in the universe, creating a sort of sucking space whirlpool. But fear not, says Kaufmann, the nearest known black hole is Cygnus X-l, and it’s 1,000 light-years away. Literally, he says, “outta sight.”

The concept of diplomatic immunity appals 38-year-old Leonard Wise. “Diplomats are untouchables. They can get away with murder—literally,” says Wise, a Toronto criminal lawyer. But what really hooked Wise on the diplomatic lifestyle was not that they could escape a certain kind of death, but the fact that the select group doesn’t have to pay taxes. “They’ve definitely got it made,” he concludes. Wise has taken the immunity concept beyond taxation in a screenplay called Diplomatic Immunity, which will become a $4.5-million movie this spring. Consulting on the project is NDP MP Bob Rae, 31, whose father, Saul Rae, is the former Canadian ambassador to the Netherlands. Wise’s story is a comedy-adventure about an

ambassador who steals a valuable bone from the Smithsonian Institution.

Fox hunting has never been fun for the fox and it is turning out to be no fun for the hunters either. About 40 miles west of Washington in Virginia’s “hunt country” a gunman has started a reign of terror on the innocent vehicles of the sport—the horses. Among those who have farms in the 30-square-mile millionaires’ hunting ground are Averell Harriman, the famed American diplomat, Senator John Warner and his actress wife, Elizabeth Taylor, as well as Paul Mellon, one of the world’s wealthiest men. Last week Pamela Harriman’s chestnut thoroughbred hunter Wingrove was felled by the sniper and the horsey set has begun stabling the horses at night. The hunt must go on, however, according to Sheila Riemenschneider, master of the local hunt: “We will not be blackmailed.”

After bashing away at Ryan O’Neal in The Main Event, Barbra Streisand is

moving on to what the showbiz trade paper Variety terms the “crashing” of the Hebrew Talmud. Streisand, 37, bought the rights to Nobel Prize-winner Isaac Bashevis Singer’s short story

Yentl, the Yeshiva Boy in 1968 and she has slated herself to star and direct the film. Canadian Ted Allan (Lies My Father Told Me) will be writing the script. The story is about a 19th-century girl who disguises herself as a boy in order to study the Jewish holy book with members of the opposite sex. At that time, girls were barred from Talmudic schools. If it sounds as though Streisand is striking a blow for women’s liberation, remember she was the one who said she thought Ms. stood for Miserable.

Between puffs on his faithful cigar, George Burns has managed to belt out a couple of country and western tunes. For his debut single, Burns, 83, chose Sonny Throckmorton’s immortal ditty ƒ Wish I Were 18 Again and Tom T. Hall’s enigmatic The Mysteries of Life.

“I made one other record in my life,” quips Burns. “It was arranged by John Philip Sousa’s father.”

Two years ago Acadian author Anton> ine Maillet came within one vote of o winning the Prix Goncourt, the literary s world’s highest international honor for w

French-language prose. Last month she won it, for her novel Pêlagie-la-Charette, and became the first woman to receive the prize in 13 years. Though the honor carries with it a prize of only 50 francs (about $14), the 50-year-old author from Bouctouche, New Brunswick, accepted the award with great enthusiasm. “Acadians,” she advises,“are not blasé.”

At 43, Dennis Hopper has been “tagged” as a perennial drug-crazed hippie. Not without trying, of course, since Hopper’s screen image as far back as the 1969 classic Easy Rider and as recent as Apocalypse Now this year has seen him swaggering to the sniff of a different snare. He may have a chance to blow the smoke from his image with his role in CeBe, a $2.2-million film which is before the cameras in Vancouver. In it he plays a truck driver who has an incestuous affair with his 14-yearold daughter, 18-year-old Linda Manz (Days of Heaven), who finds solace with a psychologist played by Canadian-born Raymond Burr (Perry Mason, Ironside). Hopper doesn’t find the role a dramatic departure (“It’s just that I’m older”), although after the union-protested firing of Winnipeg director Leonard Yakir he took an even more prominent role as director. Next on the agenda is a movie version of the Waylon Jennings hit song Honky Tonk Heroes. “It deals with dope, hookers and sexual encounters,” he explains. In short, a typical Hopper picture.

Marsha Boulton