Letters

Letters

February 12 1979
Letters

Letters

February 12 1979

Letters

Ordered law ’n’ order

The article Southern Sheriffs: Less Misbehavin' (Jan. 15) was informative and well written. It gave me an insight into what is happening in the U.S. southern states as it relates to changes in law enforcement. This story is relevant to any Canadian heading south or for those who visit the southern U.S. on a regular basis.

T. THRUSH, PICTON, ONT.

A womb with a view

They advertise toilet tissue don’t they? Why are so many Canadian women, as demonstrated in the article The Promo That Launched a Thousand Protests... (Jan. 1), ashamed that they menstruate? It is a natural biological process and I explained it as such to my four-year-old son when he asked. Better that all those women complain about the advertisements for junk food and drinks which are destroying our health.

G. JONES, INNISFAIL, ALTA.

Survival of the fullest

Having read Barbara Amiel’s review People from the School of Survival (Jan. 1) on Chaim Potok’s book Wanderings, I find it unfortunate that she has learned so little about the history of Jews. Purim, for instance, does not celebrate Haman’s death, but rather that the Persian Jewish community was spared from annihilation. It is disturbing that her view of Judaism is so heavily laden with slaughter and vengeance. Although these are facets of Jewish history, they are far from its essence. Objective research indicates that Jewish history is not dominated by slaughter and vengeance—rather, by a celebration of survival. Most of Jewish history involves the building of as full a life as

possible, in spite of the sometimes precarious status of the Jewish community.

LAWRENCE WALLACH, SYRACUSE, N.Y.

Primal cuts

So, we are not allowed to grow old disgracefully anymore! In the article Facing a Nip-and-Tuck Craze (Dec. 11), Dr. Silver says it has to do with our youth-

oriented society (young is beautiful). I agree with him about the beauty. Never in the history of womankind have so many women looked so beautiful to so

many people. There’s no doubt that plastic surgery has its place—for professionals whose faces depend on it or for people with disfigurements—but not for the normal aging process and most certainly not for Betty Ford. I loved what she stood for—courage, compassion, fortitude, family and honesty. It showed in her face. This new face looking out from the pages of Maclean's is not Betty Ford.

DORIS EWART, WINSLOE, P.E.I.

Ruling out Britannia

While it may be patriotic and something akin to motherhood to speak out against The Uncle Samming of Canadian Television . . . (Dec. 25), I hope Peter Newman is aware that on Sunday mornings it is almost impossible to hear English spoken on Canadian TV stations in Toronto. English-speaking Canadians, now guilt-ridden from pressure to cede to hundreds of so-called minorities, are slowly giving up their language and culture to almost anyone who drops in to stay.

DON BROWN, AGINCOURT, ONT.

Up hill and up dale

It’s a real pleasure to see, at long last, a good Canadian weekly newsmagazine. You will probably still have something of an uphill battle because of the number of Canadians who prefer, and sometimes fight for, U.S. media. Keep up the good standard.

WILFRID BENNETT,

WEST VANCOUVER, B.C.

The warm turns

Thanks to Peter Newman for his editorial We Long to Tread a Way None Trod Before . . . (Jan. 1). Here is one human spirit immeasurably warmed by his wisdom.

MICHAEL ESSEX, LORETTEVILLE, QUE.

Might vs. right

Congratulations to Patrick Watson for his column Why Should We Spend a Couple of Billion Bucks for a Job That Doesn't Need Doing? (Jan. 22). His ideas, which question the wisdom of Canada spending over $2 billion for a relatively small number of high-technology, foreign-built fighter aircraft, merit much publicity. Unfortunately, public opinion polls indicate the majority support high military expenditures. Pulling our weight in the Western alliance and the fear of offending our major trading partners are difficult arguments confronting any political leader who wishes to strike out on

a new course.

ROSS SMYTH, MONTREAL

Subscribers’ Moving Notice

Send correspondence to: Maclean’s, Box 1600, Station A, Toronto, Ontario M5W 2B8

Name _

New Address City _

Postal code

Prov.

My moving date is

My old address label is attached.

My new address is on this coupon.

I wish to subscribe to Maclean's. Send me 52 issues for only $19.50 (in Canada only). Elsewhere $30.00 except U.S., $26.00

I I Bill me

I enclose $.

ATTACH OLD ADDRESS LABEL HERE AND MAIL IMMEDIATELY!

I also subscribe to ( ) Chatelaine and/or ( ) Miss Chatelaine and enclose old address labels from those magazines as well.

No laughing chatter

In William Casselman’s column The Good, the Bad, the Ugly . . . (Jan. 8), do you feel it humorous to ridicule Jean Chrétien and Wally Macht for having speech impediments? I am not a fan of either of these men, but I suspect most of your readers got over laughing at the handicapped by the time they graduated from high school.

ROBERT MARINER, TANTALLON, N.S.

Dealer’s choice

I protest. In the article The New Age of Indian Art (Jan. 22), I did not confirm that Ojibway artist Benjamin Chee Chee “made $40,000 the year he died” and yet you attributed this statement to me. As his Toronto dealer (he dealt with other galleries in other parts of Canada), I could only say that I had heard that figure and agreed that it was likely.

NEIL H. SNEYD, WILDLIFE GALLERY, TORONTO

Enigmatic charismatics

Having read The New Believers, I agree that people need something stable to grasp onto and values to guide them. What worries me is the growth and attitudes of the born-again Christians and

television preachers. I question the beliefs and motives of these people in the public image presenting their views in the cause of Christianity. I consider myself to be a Christian but believe that religion is a personal thing and not something to be peddled like detergent.

CECIL S. WOODS, BURNABY, B.C.

The cover of the Jan. 1 edition [the Shroud of Turin] was most striking to the eye. Peter Newman’s editorial was encouraging and I looked forward to reading The New Believers by Angela Ferrante. She made an interesting

start; however, her bias quickly appeared in her choice of descriptive words when discussing evangelicals and those involved in the charismatic renewal of the church. Contrary to Ms. Ferrante’s information, the leaders of the Catholic charismatic renewal came from within the church, remain in the church and probably have been instrumental in bringing many people back to the church.

J.S. CLAVETTE, OSHAWA, ONT.

As you sow, ye shall pay

The article When Money Talks: The Silent Side of Pacifism (Dec. 25) seems to ignore the obvious separation of religion and occupation. Farming is a business carried out by business people whose earnings are taxed. As such, Hutterites should be no different. They derive income from the production and sale of crops and livestock, not from church activities.

BARRY KUSLER, WALSH, ALTA.