Letters

Letters

February 19 1979
Letters

Letters

February 19 1979

Letters

White is right

I must take exception to the general tone of the article Making Winter Fun (Jan. 8). Winter has been putting in an annual appearance for a number of years and most Canadians I have known have managed to enjoy it despite Roy MacGregor’s statement: “. . . the white months weren’t claimed until the 1970s.” The game of hockey was developed on outdoor ponds which certainly weren’t iced over in the summer; Quebec City had a giant toboggan run prior to the turn of the century; and outdoor rinks have always been popular. As a teen-ager in the early ’50s in Ottawa, I found that skiing became a problem on weekends simply because of the crowds. I also recall sleigh rides, sugar bush excursions, skating on the Rideau and just plain enjoyment of winter. I’ll be the first to admit that a blizzard at -20°F or -30°F could be discouraging for even the hardiest of winter enthusiasts. But we eventually learned that blizzards pass. We not only survived winter, we enjoyed it and thrived on it. It seems a pity that MacGregor feels he has had to wait until the ’70s to discover 50 per cent of his year.

DOUG SINCLAIR, RICHMOND, B.C.

How can you write an article on what Canadians are doing during the winter without mentioning the Northwest Territories or the Yukon? This is Canada too, and we do get outside during the winter.

JONQUIL GRAVES, YELLOWKNIFE, N.W.T.

The young order changeth

Your cover story The New Believers (Jan. 1) concerning the renewed interest in established churches is fascinating in that it is so predictable. The baby-boom generation has reached the 30-year-old mark. It is settling down and becoming more conservative just as previous generations have at this stage. The only difference is the size of this generation—it dominates society at whatever stage it’s at. In the ’60s, the baby-boomers were hitting 20 and turning the world on its ear with youthful energy. Ten years later it’s families, jobs and even religion. The interests of this generation become the overriding interests of society, and change as they change with age. We can therefore look forward to such delights as a massive mid-life crisis (1990), an epidemic of menopause (1995-2000) and a shortage of workers (2015).

PATRICK FLAHERTY, OTTAWA

Chuckles of shame

I am ashamed of myself. I chuckled all the way through Allan Fotheringham’s column Bayonets Beware . . . (Jan. 29), on Joe “Cecil Trueheart” Clark’s trip around the globe. What is it about human nature that takes extreme delight in hearing about other people’s gaffes?

PENNY CAMPBELL, TORONTO

Time for a transfusion

I enjoyed the article Done Politickin'— Gone Fishin’ (Jan. 29) on the resignation of Premier Frank Moores of Newfoundland. I feel it is not good for a leader to stay around too long and I agree that he should allow new blood to get into the leadership.

C.E. FRASER, KINGS CO., N.S.

Red-paint power

While I enjoyed the article The New Age of Indian Art (Jan. 22), I did discern some myopia on the part of the writer. (Was it eastern Canadian chauvinism?) There are prominent Indian painters on the Prairies and there is a vital renewal of Northwest Coast Indian art in British Columbia. Indian art in Canada is something more than what is happening east of Winnipeg.

JOHN ANSON WARNER, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, DEPT. OF SOCIOLOGY AND SOCIAL STUDIES, UNIVERSITY OF REGINA, REGINA

The lady with the lumps

Hurrah for the article The Promo That Launched a Thousand Protests... (Jan. 1) on the advertisements for feminine hygiene products. Offensive—they are downright disgusting. I hope the manufacturers take the hint and axe them. While we’re on the subject of ludicrous commercials, can you do anything about removing that full-figured woman who is having all the hassle trying to find the right bra? (And she can take her leering husband with her.)

NETTIE WILEMAN, RUSSELL, MAN.

Subscribers’ Moving Notice

Send correspondence to: Maclean's, Box 1600, Station A, Toronto, Ontario M5W 2B8

Name

My moving date is

New Address ___________

City_______________________________Prov_______

Postal code _L

ATTACH OLD ADDRESS LABEL HERE AND MAIL IMMEDIATELY!

I also subscribe to ( ) Chatelaine and/or ( ) Miss Chatelaine and enclose old address labels from those magazines as well.

My old address label is attached.

My new address is on this coupon.

I I I wish to subscribe to Maclean's. Send me 52 issues for only $19.50 (in Canada only). Elsewhere $30.00 except U.S., $26.00

I I Bill me

l I enclose $_

$ZAH1

Letters

Parity begins at home

Now that Maclean’s is firmly entrenched as Canada’s weekly newsmagazine, it seems ready to branch out as a peddler of American reality to foreign climes. I am referring to the article Easing the Trials of a Legal Career (Jan. 29), on stress in legal practice. By focusing 90 per cent of the article on the experience of American lawyers, the inferiority complex we thought we had

banished came flooding back. Why no comment from McCarthy & McCarthy, or Goodman & Goodman or any other major Canadian firm? And worst of all, why tell us that a rookie in New York can earn $30,000 when all we can look forward to on Bay Street is $20,000 tops?

GEORGE BURGER, PRESIDENT, STUDENT’S LAW SOCIETY, UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO LAW SCHOOL,

TORONTO

Hissing and telling

Here at the regional municipality of Peel, we are building a new office building that will use open landscaping and electronic sound masking. Your article White Noise: Will the Hissing Have to Stop? (Dec. 11) speculates on the possibility of harmful effects. Sound masking is not new. Purdue University’s administration building, constructed in the ’60s, was the first major full landscaped office in North America and employed mechanical sound masking, achieved via the air circulation system. Since then hundreds of buildings have been constructed all over the world. In our research, we have failed to find one

Letters

documented case of harmful effects from sound masking. When properly adjusted you do not notice it. It is like air conditioning or the distant sound of a waterfall. Properly designed landscaped offices are the most pleasant environment yet devised for office work. It is small wonder that people in this environment are highly productive.

J.A. TERRELL, SENIOR SYSTEMS ANALYST, BUILDING PROJECT, THE REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF PEEL, BRAMPTON, ONT.

Stareway to the stars

I was pleased to read Four Horsemen on the Downhill Staircase (Dec. 25). It is encouraging to see that the Canadian ski team is getting the exposure and support they deserve for their great European victories.

EILEEN GRIMSGAARD, VANCOUVER

Scareway to the scars

I would like to commend you for the article They Shall Be Known by the Scars of Torture (Jan. 1). Our committee has been involved with Chilean refugees in the Vancouver area, so we are glad your story brought into the open more information and analysis of the physical and mental torture of Chileans and some of the difficulties they encounter in Canada.

REV. WES MAULTSAID, CO-ORDINATOR, WORLD DEVELOPMENT EDUCATION, VANCOUVER

A not-so-free press

I wonder how long the people of Canada are going to put up with the misuse of their tax dollars as evidenced in the article A Helping Hand to Keep an Eye On (Jan. 15), on the $215,000 grant to the French-language paper Vêvangêline by the federal government. Surely by no stretch of the imagination can such largesse be justified to this or to any other free-enterprise journalistic venture.

ARTHUR H. WALLIS, TORONTO

Too hard on soft ‘Soap’?

I have in the past enjoyed William Casselman’s satirical columns but he should stick to humor and not social comment. In the article Let Us Now Throw a Stone through the Glass Screen . . . (Dec. 18), his attack on the show Soap was totally off base. Perhaps I should question how seriously to take the opinion of a man who wears funny hats and who defines The Beachcombers as “usually excellent.”

WILLIAM A. ULRICH, EDSON, ALTA.