People

People

Jane O’Hara February 5 1979
People

People

Jane O’Hara February 5 1979

People

It was a press agent’s dream and although most institutions with a publicity bent would welcome a visit from movie stars such as Geneviève Bujold, Christopher Plummer or Donald Sutherland, Toronto’s Metro Central Library recently nixed a planned stunt as being “too gimmicky.” The idea was that one of the above-mentioned stars of Murder by Decree, a movie about Sherlock Holmes tracking Jack the Ripper, would show up in costume at the library’s much-vaunted Arthur Conan Doyle Room. Since the movie publicists had borrowed some Sherlockiana items from the library for the Toronto premiere, they figured a guest appearance would return the favor. However, when Plummer, who plays Holmes in the film, agreed to appear he was told to take his deerstalker and make tracks. “This is nothing against Christopher Plummer,” said head librarian Margery Allen. “But it seems to me that he could be interviewed in his hotel room quite adequately without disrupting our service.”

p hether he was correcting Pierre VAJ Trudeau’s erring instinct for the wrong tie or modulating his penchant for the flip put-down, Richard (Dick) O’Hagan has been at the prime minister’s side for three years as communications adviser and architect of the nowdormant weekly news conferences. Last week, Trudeau announced that O’Hagan, 50, has poured the last round for his many friends in the Ottawa press corps and will join the Bank of Montreal as a corporate image-maker. His handpicked successor is a Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, entrepreneur and twice-defeated Liberal candidate, Arnie Patterson. When asked by a colleague whether he had an account at his new bank, O’Hagan’s parting words were: “I have a loan.”

Dn a continuing effort to keep his bionic buildup to scientific specifications, Lee Majors, TV’s Six-Million-Dollar Man, was recently sighted jogging through the snowdrifts of Montreal during a break in the shooting of the movie Agency. Although Majors was obviously undeterred by the inclement weather, his co-stars Valerie Perrine (Superman) and Robert Mitchum (Farewell, My Lovely) declined to join him on his daily constitutionals. Perrine, who took to wearing long johns to cope with the cold, said that although she loved Montreal, she “hated” its winters. And Mitchum took his only sport from assailing visitors to the set. When intro-

duced to a friend of Agency director George Kaczender—who just happened to be a film professor and movie critic— Mitchum snapped: “Does he also do windows?”

V\~\// ith notebooks in their fleece-

VAJ lined gloves and pencils in their parkas, a battalion of international press went a-hunting royalty last week hoping to catch a glimpse of Prince Charles on a ski vacation in Switzerland. However, while the media scoured the resorts from St. Moritz to Zermatt, Charles purposely avoided the après-ski scene, spending the week instead at a four-bedroom chalet in the town of Klosters, the guest of old friends Patti and Charles Palmer-Tompkinson. Although he went to practise his skiing, the prince hadn’t packed for slopes and was only spared a trip to the local sporting goods store by his hostess, who did his shopping for him. However, after spending a few unmolested days on the hills, Charles was finally recognized by a Maclean's reporter while lunching in the Hotel Alpina. When informed how popular his brother Prince Andrew had been during his year’s stay at an Ontario boarding school, Charles replied: “Well, I’m so glad he behaved himself.”

^hey met for the first time last week, although in a way Ottawa folksinger Bruce Cockburn and Canada’s

premier realist Alex Colville had been collaborators for years. The get-together was arranged to celebrate Cockburn’s first gold album (50,000 copies), Night Vision, whose sales may or may not have been affected by the fact that Colville’s haunting painting, Horse and Train (1954), was used as the cover design. The Cockburn-Colville connection goes back to 1973, when the musician saw the artist’s painting in a book he had received for Christmas. “It fit the content of the album perfectly,” said Cockburn, “but I never thought we’d get it. I thought Alex might think it was a debasement of his art.” On the contrary. Although Colville had never heard Cockburn’s work, he admitted: “I was glad to do it. I like to see my art get around.”

nil aving praised Iran as “The SwitzerLnJ land of the Middle East” in his latest book, Iran: Elements of Destiny, Canadian photographer/author Roloff Beny was not only politically misguided but financially imprudent. Commissioned by the Empress Farah and completed before Iran’s troubles took to the streets, Beny’s book is a tribute to the Pahlavi dynasty. However, with the Peacock Throne now in ruins, Beny’s royalties are likely to follow suit since 21,000 of the 50,000 books printed were kept by the monarchy to be sold in Iran. Understandably, a book glorifying the Shah isn’t likely to be an Iranian best seller and Beny isn’t expecting any money. “The whole thing is alarming for me financially,” said Beny. “After this book, I was planning three others in Iran, but now that’s nothing but a dream.”

EX part from doing dog food commerZr\Acials and a short stint in The Miracle Worker when she was eight, LynnHolly Johnson’s acting experience would fit comfortably on the head of a pin. Which makes it somewhat surprising that Johnson, 19, plays the lead role in her first movie, Ice Castles—but not all that surprising since the part called for an actress who could skate first and emote second. A competitive skater in the U.S. since age 11, Johnson toured with Ice Capades before winning the part opposite Robbie Benson. Yet, ironically, Johnson had more trouble being on blades than being on cue. “It took a lot of stamina,” said Johnson, who was given a further three-movie contract by Columbia Pictures. “I was so tired we had to shoot the skating scenes in pieces. I’m constantly putting down my skating and as for the acting, God only knows.” Edited by Jane O’Hara