People

George Horhota June 25 1979

People

George Horhota June 25 1979

People

Since the opening of Nick Mancuso's first movie, Nightwing, co-starring Kathryn Harrold, the 30-year-old Canadian’s star is clearly rising—but even his swarm of managers, agents and lawyers has not managed to reassure him. “The last few months of my life have been the hardest,” says Mancuso, who plays a Navajo sheriff in the bat-infested thriller. “After six months in Los Angeles, I lose my mind—and I was there for seven.” Already compared to such dark-eyed superstars as Robert De Niro and AI Pacino, Mancuso isn’t idling away his time waiting for all the Nightwing returns to come in. He’s in Quebec City, wrapping up his second flick, Death Ship, in which he plays an easygoing playboy, with Kate Reid. “It’s a break from the swamp of Los Angeles,” says Mancuso. “Being here is a breath of fresh air.”

With ABC-TV’s Barbara Walters interviewing Canada’s prime minister only four days after he assumed office, Joe Clark vaulted to the ranks of global celebrities such as Anwar Sadat, Barbra Streisand and George Burns—all of whom have been questioned by the $1million-per-year lithping lady. Walters was granted the first personal interview with the PM since he took office. Why was an American journalist given the honor? “As one of our poets said about why he was asked [sic] to climb a mountain, because the mountain was there,” Clark told her. “You’re here.”

Despite Walters’ prying, the one-hour discussion revealed little about Clark’s personality—the “professional politician,” as he called himself, turned aside such questions as, “You have been described again and again as, oh dear, bland, awkward. They say you bump your head when you walk. How would you describe yourself?” Clark preferred to describe his victory.

Ever since his bronze medal performance at the 1976 Olympics, Toller Cranston has been called the “Baryshnikov of the blades.” His high-class

billing was raised another notch in Paris last spring where 30,000 posters he had designed lined the Métro promoting him in a Holiday on Ice show. “I swore I’d stay until I dropped,” says Cranston, now 30, who performed an exhausting 15 shows a week for 2 Vi» months. Equally frantic off the ice, he spent some of his spare time collaborating with experimental film-maker Francois Rassenbach on a film which also featured Rudolf Nureyev and 92-year-old pianist Artur Rubinstein, one of the skater’s idols. He also managed to complete 24 sketches of harlequin skaters, which sold out this month at the Toronto gallery of his skating coach and creative mentor, Ellen Burka. “I can’t stand to be in a position where I’m not creating,” says Cranston, who is taking a few weeks off to rest up before heading to Japan to skate for 10 weeks. “While I have a bit of time, I’ll be working on my movie script. It’s sort of The Turning Point on ice, about the behind-thescenes struggles of international figureskating competitions.” Feeling his age, Cranston wants to finish the script soon so tha*. he can play the starring role.

Surely Farrah Fawcett-Majors learned something about self-exploitation after tossing her tawny mane and flashing her teeth through more than 100 TV commercials and 13 episodes of Charlie's Angels— not to mention becoming the icon of an age with her red-swimsuit poster. But when the 32-year-old sexists’ symbol let it be known around Hollywood that she wanted to “set the record straight” in a screenplay about her marriage to The Six Million Dollar Man (Lee Majors) for a fraction of the cost of building a bionic being, nobody bit. You’re only as good as your last picture, runs the adage, and in Farrah’s case her gracing of Somebody Killed Her Husband could not save it from self-destruction. Though Farrah hairdos and dolls have had to make way for the likes of Cheryl Ladd, Fawcett-Majors nevertheless plans to re-elevate her image by starring with Roger Moore in Strictly Business—a subject about which she still has a lot to learn.

lthough it has been 42 years since Turner was “discovered” in Schwab’s drugstore, aspiring actresses will be happy to hear that overnight success is still possible. When French Canadian film-maker Pierre Brousseau came across a picture of model D.D. Winters in the March 26 issue of Maclean 's, he says, he was struck by her “sheer energy and natural look.” He then tracked her to a Toronto coffee shop and, so help him God, said: “Just give me 15 minutes and I’ll change your life.” Winters found herself in Los Angeles the following day being screen-tested for Tanya's Island. Winning the lead part with no acting experience, the 20year-old former Denise Matthews of Niagara Falls, Ontario, will be off to Puerto Rico this week to begin filming the beauty-and-the-beast story. While in Hollywood, she bagged an invitation to the Academy Awards presentations — and I was promptly offered the lead in Peter Sellers’ upcoming picture, Jantu and the Magician. Moreover, she has just cut a disco record and will be featured in a winter edition of Playboy. How does all that feel? “It’s a long way from Niagara Falls.”

The guy hawking knife-sharpeners at the flea market in Aberfoyle, Ontario, sure looked familiar ... Wait now, wasn’t that Paul Bradley, star of Don Shebib’s classic Goin ’ Down the Road? Yes—not that he had fallen on hard times. The 38-year-old actor was in on-the-job training for a part in Last Dance at the Maple Leaf, a country-music drama which has just begun a cross-Canada tour. The Etrog winner portrays a Canadian singer of the 1940s alongside champion fiddler Graham Townsend. Filling the roles of country folks is nothing new for Bradley—in real life he has been an Alberta rancher (“horses bit me and hens pecked me”) and an organizer on the unsuccessful Great Canadian Wagon Train. This time around Bradley shows off his carny skills by running a sharp knife over his wrists and throat while he spiels—a trick he learned from an uncle 20 years ago. “He didn’t leave me a mansion or boat,” says Bradley, “but he taught me a professional pitch.”

Soon, apart from a somewhat soiled White House, the only building around to remind Americans of Richard Nixon will be the Watergate Hotel. Last week, any possibility of preserving the former president’s estate, in the tradition of other American leaders’ homes, ended when the Key Biscayne retreat was bulldozed asunder. (Nixon sold his San Clemente property last May.) Eduardo Ortega, new owner of Nixon’s Florida digs, decided the rather modest bungalow should be replaced with a $1million mansion. While Nixon’s neighbor Bebe Robozo may not be entirely happy with all the clatter next door, other Key residents are looking forward to the change. “People are happy that they’re getting a better property,” remarked the demoliton foreman as 15 trucks carted the building’s remains to the local dump. In fact, the only vestige of Nixon’s occupancy will be some bookshelves saved for the new house’s study. And while Nixon has at least profited by the loss of his two homes, Billy Carter may not be so lucky. President Jimmy’s brother has been ordered either to keep up with his payments or risk losing his $55,000 house in Georgia.

Edited by George Horhota