People

People

Marsha Boulton March 17 1980
People

People

Marsha Boulton March 17 1980

People

There wasn’t a whole lot of shakin’ going on at the Night Story disco in Tokyo last week, despite the fact that jet-set boogier Margaret Trudeau had been hired to appear in her dancing booties for three days—and for $20,000. Instead the session turned into a veritable sit-in, with the estranged wife of Pierre Trudeau presiding over the glitz as demurely as if it were a tea party. Her foray to Japan turned into a 10-day, all-expense-paid holiday financed by retired physician Dr. Kichinosuke Sasaki, 47, who owns the disco building. After the no-dance show, Trudeau toured the

countryside with her sister, Janet Sinclair. Back on the home front, Maggie T.’s lawyers were waging a war with California producer Bob McHatton, who wants to film her autobiography, Beyond Reason. “Her lawyers told me Pierre was putting pressure on her—he was afraid it would make him look bad,” says McHatton, whose production company plans to go ahead with other projects, including a documentary on Benito Mussolini.

There will be pandemonium in fanzine-land as lovely, lithe Leif Garrett loses a few inches of his 18-year-old curly locks to prepare for serious stardom. Garrett, one of those rare curiosities who was actually born in Hollywood, steps into the boxing ring this month to begin work on the life story of former featherweight boxing champion Danny (Little Red) Lopez, which should

surface next fall as a CBS Movie of the Week. Even more fitful for the screaming-16 set is the vision of Garrett dying his sandy mane bright red. “I understand that it’s all part of being an actor,” said Garrett before the dye was cast. In preparation for his role, Garrett is also undergoing bodywork at Los Angeles’ Main Street Gym where Barbra Streisand and Ryan O’Neal practised slugfests for The Main Event. The more serious side of Garrett will be unveiled later this month when he leads a Houston March of Dimes walkathon and when he heads into court to answer charges of drunken driving for a car accident last fall in which a passenger driving with him was seriously injured.

i í Jk 11 in all, it was hard work,” sighed #%Clara Jean Howard, 17, the freshly crowned Miss Teen Canada. Howard won the crown and more than $10,000 in booty over 30 other pubescent contestants. The Grade 12 student from Charlottetown entered the contest after students at her high school made her their nominee. “Beauty pageants have never appealed to me,” she said after winning. “I have never wanted to be the Potato Bowl Queen.”

Throughout the election, photographers had a hard time getting a clear shot of Pierre Trudeau without assistant press aide Suzanne Perry. Perry, 30, has now assumed a certain power in the

Prime Minister’s Office and the question often asked around Parliament Hill is: “Who is that blonde and where did she come from?” Insiders describe Perry as “a bit of a gypsy,” which shows in her background: after attending three universities, she headed for New York where she modelled for such feminine publications as Mademoiselle and Seventeen. Perry found modelling “a mental void” and returned to Canada where she took a string of public relations jobs and served as research assistant to then secretary of state Gérard Pelletier. Following service as communications director to the Pepin-Robarts Task Force on Canadian Unity, she joined Trudeau’s staff in February, 1979. The divorced mother of a 10-yearold son, Perry finds Ottawa “one of the loneliest cities I’ve ever lived in,” although she has been romantically linked with a number of local lawyers

and television reporters. Piqued press interest in the woman at Trudeau’s elbow has caused Perry to keep a low profile recently. In fact, she is looking for another job.

As bulky body-builder Lou Ferrigno can attest, “It isn’t easy being green.” Ferrigno, 58-34-24, went green all over in 1977 as Bill Bixby’s rampaging alter ego in the TV fantasy series The Incredible Hulk. Prior to his boob-tube debut, the 28-year-old New Yorker had won such pumping-iron crowns as the Mr. Teenage America contest, Mr. America and Mr. Universe, with time out for a stint as a sheet-metal worker and brief service as a defensive tackle

for the Toronto Argonauts. Now Ferrigno is pumping up for the classics and hopes to play the Lon Chaney Jr. role of a homicidal giant in the remake of the 1940 film Of Mice and Men based on John Steinbeck’s novel. “Playing the Hulk isn’t as easy as it looks,” explains six-foot-five Ferrigno. “After putting on makeup for two hours, I have to go out and break down walls. Without the self-discipline of weight-lifting, I don’t know how I’d do it.”

iflt will be the first time I’ve ever I tried to sing with any conviction,” says comedian Chevy Chase, whose first vocal album, Live at the Garden, will be released this month. Included on the record will be a parody of Stevie Wonder’s latest, titled The Secret Life of Animals, and a Donna Summer takeoff called Love to Have My Baby. Chase has also been writing a movie script that he

hopes Michael O’Donoghue (Mr. Mike's Mondo Video) will direct. O’Donoghue is enthusiastic about the project, Planet of the Cheap Special Effects. Some of the “really cheap” special effects include a spine-mangler, six-foot lung worms and “the flying lunch,” which features “a creature that is half fly, half tuna-noodle casserole, and eats your face.”

In 1941, Walter Farley was a New York City high-school student who had never seen an Arabian horse, but that didn’t stop him from writing his famous first novel, The Black Stallion. “It’s the only dollar I’ve ever made,” says 57year-old Farley, who went on to write more than 20 horsey novels. This month Canadians will begin lining up to see the film version of Farley’s story of a young boy who tames a wild ebony horse and conquers North American racetracks. The film’s 11-year-old star is Cass-Olé of San Antonio, Texas, who was spotted by Farley five years ago in a horse-ring. Farley “held out” for five years to have producer Francis Coppola cast 15-hand Cass as The Black, and he seems to have been right about the horse’s potential. Cass has already been signed (or branded) for his second major role—The Return of the Black Stallion.

Ottawa’s born-again Christian Bruce Cockburn conquered Italy last fall with his incandescently laid-back style and, after being heralded in Milan as “a new man of the ’80s,” he’s back in Canada and back on the road. The “new” Cockburn doesn’t talk much during his concerts, preferring to beguile audiences with his latest musical incarnation which extends out of the crunchygranola folk genre and into a lyrical jazz format. He remains, however, ambiguously charming. When hecklers at a recent concert in Toronto began demanding “happy songs,” Cockburn quietly peered over his glasses and announced: “They’re all happy songs— sometimes it’s just hard to tell.”

When the final TV taping of The Palace took place this month at Hamilton Place, Mayor Jack MacDonald rose to the stage to make the show’s host singer, Jack Jones, and regular comic relief, Marty Allen, honorary citizens of the Ontario steel city. Silver-haired MacDonald will miss Jones and Allen until they return in July for more tapings. Jones had been renting a condominium owned by MacDonald and Allen was beginning to receive jokes from MacDonald. “I’d write one funny line to every 20 of Marty’s,” laments the showbiz mayor. “With him gone I don’t think my material will be as funny.”

Marsha Boulton