Letters

April 28 1980

Letters

April 28 1980

Letters

Sex makes the teens go 'round

Contrary to the view implied in your article on Teen Sex (Cover, March 31), I do not regard maturity and the ability to communicate sufficient prerequisites for sex. I feel that sex without the proper commitment is like food without digestion. It’s incomplete, and the consequences are sorrowful. It has to be a commitment based on unconditional love, otherwise the process of digestion can easily break down when faults appear or emotions flare. Conditional commitment provides but a shaky foundation upon which to build a relationship. Sex belongs to troth. It belongs to a love that doesn’t depend on performance or mere attraction. It belongs to that state depicted by the words: “for better for worse, for richer for poorer, in sickness and in health, ’til death do us part.”

WILLIAM R. MOORE, KINGSTON, ONT.

Congratulations on your provocative and well-researched article on teen sex. It may interest your readers to know that in addition to the many resources and resource people cited by Judith Timson, there is also available a recently completed series of four halfhour television programs on this subject. The programs, from the TVOntario series COPE, examine aspects of teenage sex and sexuality from the teen point of view. They are available to public institutions, libraries, schools, etc. and are designed to spark discussion.

CLAUDIA PAGE, PRODUCER/DIRECTOR, COPE, TVONTARIO, TORONTO

I object to Canada’s national newsmagazine having its cover and feature story on sex—sex at any age. If I chose to read about that tiresome subject, I’d subscribe to a sex magazine.

EVE M. TURCOTTE, STURGEON FALLS, ONT.

To soothe the savage breast

In your article Workingman ’s Rock Music (Music, March 17), you called Circus a “cheapie rock” magazine. I believe that many people may hold contrary views on this subject. I am speaking for myself and numerous friends when I say that I consider Circus to be one of the best rock magazines on the market

today. The fact that it has been able to compete with established magazines like Creem, and that about a year and a half ago it became a weekly publication, proves that many people do not consider it to be a cheap rock magazine. It is not a teen idol magazine either. If you would give the publishers the consideration of reading one of their issues you would find that they have no silly contests or slogans. Their sole purpose is to inform the public of the most popular music of this country.

TONY HAMBLETON, SELKIRK, MAN.

Gremlins in the stew

In your article Saskatchewan Shares the Wealth (Canada, March 31), Suzanne Zwarun writes: “Ibsen conjured up ghosts, goblins and gonorrhea from the unforgiving landscape of his homeland Sweden.” Sweden, eh? If Henrik Ibsen’s homeland was Sweden, then Bjorn Borg is the pride of Norway.

NORM IBSEN, LONDON, ONT.

Sermon on the mount

I really enjoyed your personable human interest story on our “crazy Canucks” (A Little Matter of Russian Roulette, Sports, March 17). I think that those four young men have done a great deal to promote both a sport and an identity for Canada. We may not always win in these major sporting events, but through the intelligence, sensitivity and all-round good sportsmanship that Read, Podborski, Irwin and Murray project, we certainly come out on top. I, for one, certainly hope that they continue to ski for Canada because they are winners to me.

LINDSAY YATES, WILLOWDALE, ONT.

Unjust deserts

That any Canadian, regardless of where he or she may have originated, should have to face the type of justice described in your article After the Beating, a House for Sale (Canada, March 10) is abominable. What is even worse is the fact that the father of the culprit condoned what his son did and laid a civil charge on the already assaulted party. Respect for others and their property should be taught.

W.J. GAIGER, SOUTHAMPTON, ONT.

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Give us this day

Pierre Berton, in his article A Pause That Preserves (Podium, March 24), said “we believe in the shock value of a holiday. We need something startling to shake the nation from its lethargy.” Agreed. But one new national holiday is all we’re going to get, and in my opinion it shouldn’t be Heritage Day, which looks to the past, but Energy Day, which looks to the future. It is around energy, not historical preservation, that our most dangerous lethargy problem lies.

ANTHONY J. PATTERSON, OTTAWA.

Truth or consequences

Your Letter From a Not-So-Absent Friend (Podium, March 31) by Rabbi Abraham Feinberg should encourage all Canadians to be “true to ourselves.” His hope “that as a united people you will continue to remind humanity that the way of compromise and conciliation can also be the way of courage” should be echoed as the hope of all true Canadians.

C. HUGH LOGIE, VANCOUVER, B.C.

Talk-show showdown

If I had a vote in the referendum, it would certainly be uoui.” (Ryan’s Express Loses Steam, Canada, March 31). Then all the rest of Canada could revert to unilingual English, ending this divisive bilingualism, saving untold multimillions of dollars, and become, once again, a united, cohesive country.

BILL HEATHER, DELTA, B.C.

As an English Canadian who has lived in Quebec City for the past two years and follows with interest the referendum debate, I take strong issue with the tenor of your reporting but, more importantly, feel your readers outside of Quebec are being sold a bill of goods. In ordinary times, this sort of reporting would simply be part of the explanation for why Canada has two continuing solitudes. However, these are not ordinary times. Federalists and sovereigntists alike are engaged in a serious and sincere debate about the future of Quebec society. Regardless of which side wins the referendum, English Canadians will have to come up with a serious and sincere response of their own. If the quality of information they are getting from Maclean’s is any indication, that response is instead going to be wholly ludicrous and, in the end, all Canada will suffer.

J. ROBERTS, QUEBEC CITY