PEOPLE

PEOPLE

BARBARA MATTHEWS October 5 1981
PEOPLE

PEOPLE

BARBARA MATTHEWS October 5 1981

PEOPLE

"We have a crisis now in film. Everybody wants to do it fast and make money,” laments almond-eyed French-Canadian actress Carole Laure, 31. Since her bright international reputation as a screen star was dulled by the scathing reviews of Fantastica last year at Cannes, Laure has completed a film in France and turned down three other movie offers. Instead, she is co-starring with composer/boyfriend Lewis Furey in their own stage production, You Too Must Have Lied, which opened in Montreal last week. Its 27 songs and a multitude of monologues took Laure and Furey three months to rehearse—and the show is only set to run for three weeks. But while “international big-name directors elude me,” Laure is delighted with “flesh and blood” audiences. “It doesn’t make any sense,” says Furey, “but it pleases us.”

Toronto film-maker Paul Lynch, 35, is confident that when his latest horror film, Humungus, is released next summer it will make the careers of a couple of Canadian movie hopefuls. “I have a tiny part,” says one of Lynch’s bright lights, stage actress Shay Garner, 28. “But I like the role because the woman I play gets revenge in the end.” Though plot details are a closely held secret, Garner will say that her character gets even by unleashing her dogs on a nasty—a scene that initially backfired. “Instead of coming to my rescue, the dogs—a Doberman and German shepherd—attacked each other right over us.” Luckily, Garner emerged unscathed and is back “on the streets” hunting up more movie work. Lynch, meanwhile, is planning a new sex thriller, Cross Country, and anticipat-

ing big box-office. His last film, Prom Night, grossed $20 million in North America alone.

When Edmonton’s Citadel Theatre opened its fall season last week with Brian Moore’s Catholics, the drama went beyond the confines of the stage. In the lobby, surrounded by protective paparazzi, Edmonton Journal drama critic Keith Ashwell made his appearance despite a request by the Citadel’s management that the Journal reassign him. According to Walter Cavalieri, director of public relations at the theatre, Ashwell became an unwelcome guest when he wrote a column last month “accusing the Citadel of being rapacious and intentionally driving other theatre groups out of the city.” Although Ashwell acknowledges that the column was a factor in the rift, he feels that his persona non grata status arose from a shaky relationship with the Citadel’s executive producer, Joe Shoctor. Says Ashwell: “Joe has both said and written that he is exercising great restraint in not punching me in the face.” The next act is eagerly awaited.

^ 1-^eing misunderstood, being -Uchopped down undeservedly is no fun ... but it comes with the territory,” says 53-year-old Pulitzer Prizewinning playwright Edward Albee resignedly. His own reputation has risen and plummeted since his 1958 play The Zoo Story. Albee’s critically creamed adaptation of Vladimir Nabokov’s Lolita on Broadway last spring was “the worst three months of my life,” he says. “Fortunately some people realized it was not the play that folded, but the production.” Since then he has completed a

play about homosexuality, Another Part of the Zoo, and now he wants to write one about incest. “I plan to touch on all bases except bestiality,” he laughs. Shrugging off critics’ intimations of a decline in the quality of his work, Albee adds: “You wait. Five years ago I was overpraised. Today I’m underpraised. It will be 50 years before someone will figure out where I belong.”

A Canadian bird in an Arab’s hand will soon be worth considerably more than two in the Central Arctic to the Kitikmeot Inuit Association of Cambridge Bay, N.W.T. The bird is the gyrfalcon, similar to hunters long used by enthusiasts of the sport of falconry in the Middle East and recently removed from the endangered species list. Who the Arabs are is anybody’s guess. “The sheiks are very nervous about publicity,” says Roger Rawlyk, executive director of the association. Rawlyk will only say that the idea came out of a social gathering in Ottawa when a contact tipped off Kitikmeot’s president, Bobby Kadlum, to the Arab’s love for falconry. The Territories’ wildlife service gave its permission last week for the Inuits to begin trapping 50 of the birds, which will be sold to four Middle Eastern countries in order to raise money for community projects. Though he will not say who they are, Rawlyk will name the price they are willing to pay: a cool $10,000 per bird.

At 49, Elizabeth Taylor handily conquered Broadway her first time out. Now she’s adding another new, if humble, dimension to her acting career—a guest role on the top-rated ABCTV afternoon soap, General Hospital.

“Elizabeth will be introduced as a ‘surprise’ relative,” says a network spokesperson. Mikkos Cassadine, played by Canadian guest star John Colicos, will get the surprise. Taylor materializes as his long lost wife, Helena, only to disappear again after about a month. Scoring Taylor is the second major coup for the show’s producer, Gloria Monty. In the late ’60s when her Secret Storm regular Christina Crawford was ill, Monty persuaded her mommie dearest, Joan, to fill in briefly.

All that glitters is $80,000 worth of gold, diamonds, rubies and emeralds in Ralph Togel’s miniature castle, Splendor of the East. The 49-year-old Toronto jeweller has been at work on “a dream” since 1971 when his mother died and left him nearly three kilograms of gold coins. Ignoring their escalating value, Togel refused to cash in the coins. Instead he used them to build the fairy-tale castle in his “spare time”—nearly 8,000 hours of it so far. With pearls riding high atop golden turrets, diamond-studded archways, a secret dungeon and drawbridge mechanism, the castle may attract several rich prospective buyers when it is finished next year. But Togel has not yet put a price on it, and making a profit was never his intention. Says Togel with a sigh: “It’s my hobby.”

When asked by screen siren Jean Harlow about the pronunciation of her first name, Margot Asquith (wife of then British prime minister Herbert Asquith) replied, “The ‘t’ is silent—as in Harlow.” Such devastating retorts are increasingly rare, according to 47-yearold Etobicoke, Ont., “insultant” Nancy McPhee. She should know. Her 1978 Book of Insults was such a success that her second compilation was published this month. “I may have a nasty bent of mind, but it’s really just the wordplay that attracts me to these pieces,” admits McPhee. While collecting barbed witticisms has been a hobby for years, McPhee credits her career as a political analyst with fuelling the desire to make them available to everyone: “I got tired of listening to politicians sitting around insulting each other—in a second-rate way.”

For anyone who has to scrimp to meet car payments, the latest safety stunt sponsored by the ministry of transport may seem like a wilful waste of money. Last week in Ottawa, a bedraggled group of officials—including federal Transport Minister JeanLuc Pepin and Canadian Transport Commission President Edgar J. Benson-huddled in a heavy rain to watch the kickoff event of a five-year campaign called Operation Lifesaver. What they saw was a late-model Ford LTD being smashed at a railway crossing by a 115-tonne locomotive. When the low odds for drivers had been suitably illustrated, Pepin spoke about the 83 deaths in similar accidents last year and of his own near-miss 15 years ago when a railway car he had been in moments before was struck by a truck. All in all, ample justification for the $450,000 campaign.

Prominent Toronto criminal lawyer Eddie Greenspan has discovered a way of excusing his flubbed CBC Radio audition to play himself in next year’s 26-part docu-drama, Scales of Justice. “Spencer Tracy did a better Clarence Darrow than Darrow himself,” he says. Greenspan, 37, thought everything ran smoothly as he read his own crossexamination from a 1975 murder trial. “I thought I was good enough for the jury,” he says of the courtroom dramatics, which resulted in an acquittal for his client. “But obviously I wasn’t good enough for the CBC—they called in AI Waxman to play me.” Settling for the host’s spot on the show, Greenspan says: “I wasn’t hurt, but if [Waxman] finds it funny ... it’s not hard for him to win over an entire nation. Let him try to win over a jury.”

BARBARA MATTHEWS