PEOPLE

BARBARA MATTHEWS November 9 1981

PEOPLE

BARBARA MATTHEWS November 9 1981

PEOPLE

Scott Hylands has been touted this season as Stratford Festival director John Hirsch’s most talented find. But working with Brian Bedford, Derek Goldby and Hirsch himself is not enough to keep the Yellowknife-born actor on native soil. After a three-week run of Stratford’s closing play, Wild Oats, at the National Arts Centre in Ottawa, Hylands is heading back to Los Angeles, where he has spent the past 10 years playing Shakespearean roles and acting in the occasional movie (Death Hunt, The Boys in Company C). The 38year-old protean says he enjoyed his “theatrical sabbatical” in idyllic Stratford and would like to return next year. “I had three good roles, all critically acclaimed, and they gave me a farm to live on. What’s to complain?” Better opportunities await him south of the border, however: “The Toronto theatre scene just doesn’t have the chances or the money. And I do have to pay those bills.”

Despite rumors to the contrary, ailing actor Richard Harris, 49, swears he will make his Broadway debut as King Arthur in Camelot next week. A nervous breakdown compounded by hypoglycemia forced the reformed brawler off the stage and into Miami’s Pritikin Longevity Center nearly a month ago. But a special diet and 13 km of jogging a day seem to have improved his health and reinforced his determination. “I’ve dreamed of appearing on Broadway all my life,” says Harris, who originally played Arthur 14 years ago on film. The gruelling pace of touringeight shows in five days—was more than his stage predecessor, an aging and arthritic Richard Burton, could stand. “Burton and I are different

men,” says Harris. “This is the culmination of my life’s work [and] I will do it in a wheelchair.” The show may go on.

Vanessa Harwood, 33, principal dancer with the National Ballet of Canada, is best known for the sultry, vamp-like quality she imparts to her roles. At 18, she played a prostitute in The Rake's Progress, and her interpretation of the Black Swan has been called “torchy.” Yet it was the ethereal vulnerability of Harwood as Juliet that caught the eye of world-renowned photographer André Kertész. The man who gained a reputation as a chronicler of dance in Paris 60 years ago turned to fashion photography in 1936 after a feud with the American Ballet Theater. Harwood—captured alone in an enor-

mous barren studio—is the first dancer he has photographed since. The result is a combination of naturalness and isolation reminiscent of Edgar Degas’ ballet paintings. Says Harwood: “Working with Kertész was like dancing at Covent Garden. You have the eerie feeling that all the dancers from the past are in the wings watching.” The photographs, on exhibition at Toronto’s Jane Corkin Gallery, will tour Canada next year.

fter extensive cost analyses, Miracle Food Mart slashed prices on 2,000 items in its 73 Ontario stores last week by an average of 10.5 per cent. Caught with egg on their corporate faces, the chain’s major competitors labelled the move a “desperate play,” but said they, too, would lower prices. Then they had to figure out what Miracle was charging. Spies abounded. In one Miracle store Elvira Casper—a customer— was ejected by a vigilant store clerk for writing down the price of butter. Then three genuine price checkers from Loblaws were charged with public mischief after they refused to leave their posts in two Miracle stores. While the price war continues, shoppers in the rest of the country have reason to wail: spokesmen for Loblaws, Dominion and even Miracle’s parent, Steinberg Inc., say there are no plans to escalate the war in areas not served by Miracle.

-EDITED BY BARBARA MATTHEWS